She Had A Flower in Her Mouth. Marta Jakubowski AW19

Marta Jakubowski is a London-based designer who was born in Poland and raised in Germany. She graduated with MA Womenswear from the Royal College of Art London and was selected to showcase her collections during London Fashion Week as part of the British Fashion Council’s NEWGEN initiative since. Marta Jakubowski has worked with brands including Hussein Chalayan, Alexander Wang and Jonathan Saunders, and has developed an unmistakable minimalist signature – sharp tailoring. She was shortlisted for the LVMH prize and Woolmark prize 2018 and continues to showcase her seasonal collections in London. Her minimalist, distinctive aesthetic envisions a mysterious woman, never obvious. Jakubowski’s autumn-winter 2019 highlights are: the deconstructed, masculine coat in brown and the equally dissected red knit that seems to connect with the person wearing it, like some sort of alien organism. Models  who walked the designer’s runway had an anthurium in their mouth, which you might read solely as a visual treat, or maybe, as a hidden message. In many cultures, this flower symbolizes hospitality. Does it relate to Marta’s collection in any way? Interpret it the way you really want to…

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Cozy. Asai AW19

London born and based designer A Sai Ta launched his label Asai with Fashion East in February 2017. After graduating from his BA at Central Saint Martins, he gained experience at The Row – and was headhunted for a position at Kanye West’s Yeezy a year into his MA.  However, the designer didn’t end on resting on laurels, and continues his own path in London. Today, he presented his first solo fashion show, and it was pure brilliance. Asai takes the familiar, and reimagines it iconoclastically by entering into nuances of his British-Chinese-Vietnamese cultural heritage as a second generation Londoner. Taking the craftsman’s spirit from his parents – a seamstress mother and a carpenter father – ASAI often employs surface decoration and fabric manipulation to create intricate textiles, which mirrors the designer’s appeal to disrupt familiar visual codes. For autumn-winter 2019, the designer went into something more cozy, even highland-ish. Ecru knits, beige puffer coats, brown, ruffled maxi-dresses, flurry slip-ons and fleecy crown-beanies felt like ready for high altitudes. The patchwork looks were insanely good, just the label’s already-cult Hot Wok Top, this time around kept in an earthy colour palette.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.