Men’s – Quite Clean, Really. Givenchy AW19

Clare Waight Keller nails it lately at Givenchy. Her men’s autumn-winter 2019, presented for the first time separately from women’s, proves that she feels more and more confident in creating a guy’s wardrobe. “I went into my own self, really, back into the ’90s, and how I felt when I was really young, how we’d dress on not a lot of money. At Givenchy we have young Parisians from schools here, and there’s this same perverse poshness, wearing tailoring in a really sharp way, with a shirt or T-shirt,” she said during the intimate presentation that took place in Paris today. “Quite clean, really.” Polished, slim-fit trousers and leather jackets dangerously looked like Hedi Slimane’s Celine, but the other part of the collection – the more elegant – is where you can completely loose your mind for. This tailoring. See the flared trousers, that came in deep red, cerulean blue and dark purple. Waight Keller attributed them to the “softness and fluidity I like for men”. Some looks had a sensually highlighted waist, something that’s having a graceful return to menswear. There was lots of elevated sportwear, but nothing will beat this one, simple look made up of a white shirt, just partially tucked into the waisted suitspants. Less is more is a cliché, I know, but in case of Waight Keller’s Givenchy, it’s just right.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s – Moving Bodies. JW Anderson AW19

Undoubtedly, Jonathan Anderson‘s leap from London to Paris resulted in an even more uninspiring men’s London fashion week this season. Well, good for the latter. J.W. Anderson kicked off the Parisian schedule with a brilliantly diverse collection, made up of the boys’ autumn-winter 2019 and the girls’ pre-fall 2019. At a first sight, ‘chaos’ is a word that comes to your mind while going through the collection. The models wore medieval-esque hoods with over-sized bermuda shorts, boldly striped tops and huge bracelets. Another look had fringed trousers, an exaggerated sailor collar and an absolutely distorted knit that no longer can be classified as a sweater. The women’s part was rich in polka-dots, XXL shirting and equally voluminous dresses worn over hoodies or with huge pussy-bows. The venue, filled with Paul Thek’s art installations, was a mash-up of vintage rugs, floor drawings. And of course, there was this huge, balloon globe. Everything here seemed to be full of some unidentified energy. Those garments had the vibrance that instantly reminds of Bodymap, the London-based brand that was on everybody’s lips in the 80s. Whatever stood behind the collection this time around, one thing’s clear: Anderson does it again. The strange and odd looks familiar and desirable. I’m extremely looking forward to get those zebra-print socks.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.