Handpicking Dressing. Maryam Nassir Zadeh AW18

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It’s the post-fashion-month marathon chill that really lets you look back at some of the season’s best, yet off the radar, collections. I’m always impressed with Maryam Nassir Zadeh‘s work, whether we’re speaking of her New York boutique that sells a well-curated bunch of favourite designers, or the ready-to-wear brand she designs herself. This season, Maryam introduces ‘handpicking dressing’ – so a very spontaneous, artistically oriented, but laid-back way of wearing clothes. Brief examples: a sari top over a sweater dress, acid-green pants and Western boots, shiny prairie dress topped with glass heart necklace. But for Nassir Zadeh, not only the clothes matter – it’s also the authenticity. “There’s so much minimalism out there, and I’m such a fan of minimalism, but people copy each other so much. So to make something your own and make it personal with something from the heart, with a unique touch, that’s authentic. It tells a story.” Here, she points out the usage of the most contrasting textiles, wearing the quirkiest jewellery and the cutest mini-bags. It might all sound like a description of a desperate identity seeker. But no – Maryam Nassir Zadeh actually does the most elusive, sensual and wearable fashion in New York. With love and passion.

Can’t wait for the autumn-winter 2018 to hit the stores? You better get hold of those  candy pink Agnes boots or spring-ready Sophie sandals in lemon by the designer.

 

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

 

First Lady. Louis Vuitton AW18

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Nicolas Ghesquiere seems to enjoy France’s First Lady, the chicest Brigitte Macron. Rather than going for another pair of best-seller sneakers (that one point make you puke, since everyone has them / wants them), the creative director of Louis Vuitton decided to do a collection dedicated to the Parisian bourgeois. By that, I mean classy skirtsuits, wearing one glove instead of two (how nonchalant…) and slightly historic looking silk blouses with voluminous sleeves. The mood was contemporary, as usual, but definitely less sci-fi. The ‘grounded’ feeling makes this collection commercial and a bit more approachable for a ready-to-wear client, that’s for sure. But other than the fancy Louvre venue and the lovely yellow fur jacket, will you remember anything else from this outing?

And yes, I’ve finally finished the fashion month coverage. Bye, Pareeh!

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Distant. Céline AW18

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There was something of Phoebe Philo in Céline‘s autumn-winter 2018 collection. But still, that ‘something’ was very, very distant. She’s not there. There’s no soul in these clothes, even if they are worn by Phoebe’s favourite Binx Walton and Charlee Fraser. Those are just the ‘tricks’ Philo would probably have used if she was still around the studio. The heavy palette of navy, brown and black slightly suggest, that even the ‘inside’ designers of Céline feel the misery. Well, this doesn’t mean it’s a collection to ignore – you better snath one of those voluminous coats or masculine blazers before Hedi Slimane fully hits the house. And also, please give a chance to this random, yet adorable vegetable print dress.

By the way… I can’t agree with the thought Phoebe isn’t THERE. And you?

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Cool Girls Only. Miu Miu AW18

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So many things come to one’s mind when looking at Miu Miu‘s brilliance this season! The models’ beautiful beehive hair resembled John Waters’ cult Hairspray film in all possible ways. Over-sized shoulders of the jackets had something of Rockabilly sensitivity. The clothes, stacked somewhere between the 60s and 80s, define cool. Oh, and there was Elle Fanning, opening and closing the show effortlessly. All hail Miuccia Prada for letting youthful spirit to the season, without necessarily leaning on hoodies and sneakers. Quite obsessed with this nostalgic cool girl pack.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.