Egypt in NYC. Chanel Pre-Fall 2019

Chanel‘s Métiers d’Art shows are the only ones I look at. I love the craftsmanship involved here – it’s different level comparing to the ridiculous ready-to-wear collections, but looks more wearable than in the couture outings. This time, Karl Lagerfeld took his guests to New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art to pull off an Ancient Egypt-inspired collection. To be honest, most of the clothes looked hideous and even the beauty of the surrounding tombstones and artifacts couldn’t hide this fact. BUT. Some of the details were impressive. The Amarna-inspired make-up. The gold-painted legs of every model. And the opulent appreciation of jewels and everything that’s shiny – a feature of every Egyptian king and queen. Would today’s Nefertiti dress in a Chanel tweed jacket made out of golden threads? Absolutely yes. But will real Chanel customers be able to wear any of this without looking ‘dressed up’ for a theme party? Who knows.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Pertinent. Givenchy Pre-Fall 2019

Clare Waight Keller continues to thrive at helm of Givenchy, and the pre-fall 2019 collection of hers proves that very, very well. For the collection, Clare chose the myth of Icarus as her message and included various allusions to deities, minotaurs, the sky, and the sea. “Mythology always seems to capture people’s imagination. There’s a dreamlike element, but it’s also grounded in something pertinent,” she explained. However, the designer didn’t go too literal with it.  The ostrich-feathered tunic and the wing-like protrusions of a yellow minidress might have nodded to the mythological fallen hero. But then, you can equally treat them as some very, very chic eveningwear. The line-up, featuring Waight Keller’s favourite model, Veronka Kunz, and other Givenchy muses, was all about simple cuts that brought a sharp, distinct look. The exaggerated, short blazers or voluminous faux fur coats are my highlights.

Collages by Edward Kanarecki.

American Hustle. Alexander Wang AW19

Alexander Wang presented his autumn-winter 2019 collection months ahead of the rest, just like last season, and here we are – already thinking about outerwear and knits we would love to wear this winter, but which we will get sometime in 2019. Wang’s newest outing is his best to date – it’s badass, it’s cool, it’s New York. It’s Alexander Wang we know, and have missed for a while. This one, the designer said, was a “celebration of the American hustle. We’re taking stereotypes of class and wealth and trying to remix them, giving status symbols a new sensibility.” There was something downtown (safety pins, lots of leather and leopard print) and uptown (tweed suits, tennis sweaters, evening gowns, crisp shirting), clashed and collage-ed. The leather garment bags, carried by models (see Malgosia Bela and Kiki de Willems), were inspired by images of the 80s career types toggling between the office and the health club. I’m not entirely sure of the clothes when put seperately, but the show’s styling was on point – take the towel turbans or the boys’ take on suiting.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Tokyo Boy. Dior Men Pre-Fall 2019

So we came to this moment in fashion, when menswear’s pre-collections are as important as women’s. Or, as in case of Kim Jones’s latest line-up for Dior Men, even more significant (sorry, Maria Grazian Chiuri). It’s just his second season at Dior’s menswear line, but Jones isn’t afraid to take big steps to catch everybody’s attention. Well, and there are major reasons why Dior Men is so appealing lately – just see your Instagram feed that is still buzzing with the designer’s Tokyo extravaganza. The new collection reinterpreted Christian Dior’s love for Japanese culture through multiple lenses, including cherry blossom prints (thought no one would make them look THIS fresh) and two kimono-inspired looks, made in leather. But Kim smoothly avoided Japan-related clichés, by focusing on today’s Japanese way of dressing – and the beloved, futurist aesthetic. Best prove of the latter: Japanese artist Hajime Sorayama created a 39-foot fembot sculpture for the runway’s set; a similar silver robot appeared as a print in the collection. Utility and workwear were represented via metallic harnesses with Dior’s signature chair caning at the back and robot-inspired jewellery. Very cosmic. But what’s most impressive about Jones’s work at Dior – which he already demonstrated last season – is the way he combines menswear easiness with couture level craftsmanship. A white astrakhan bomber that shaded into a toile de Jouy is something elegant, yet wearable, and surely with a out-of-this-world price tag. The more conservative, business-kind of Dior Men client will choose tailoring and (possibly) several of those asymmetrical suits.
Collage by Edward Kanarecki.