The 2010s / Dries Van Noten’s 100th Collection

Believe it or not – I can’t! – but we’re heading towards a new millenium. So, how do you choose the most important collections, designers and labels of the decade? The ones that made an actual impact in the 2010s? Well, it’s not an easy task. It all began in September 2009 with New York’s spring-summer 2010 shows and ended when the autumn-winter 2019 haute couture shows wrapped in Paris. Few thousands of shows, by the way. There will be 19 posts (that’s really the only possible minimum!) reminding about the best – and if not the best, then strongly influencing – moments in fashion.

Dries Van Noten‘s 100th collection.

Autumn-winter 2017 was Dries Van Noten‘s 100th collection. And just as he did at menswear the same season, the Belgian designer was reflecting on the past, future, and most of all – the contemporary. Małgosia Bela, Nadia Auermann, Hanne Gaby, Mica Arganaraz, Carolyn Murphy, Debra Shaw and many, many more runway icons, veterans and today’s favourites walked the show. Some of them were present in Van Noten’s first show back in the late 80s, which added up to the sentimental mood. The collection was of course one of the biggest highlights in Van Noten’s career. It was all about the designer’s “codes”, which blur the lines between women’s and men’s. Masculine coats and over-sized denim pants; velvet bomber jackets styled with pencil skirts; sheer dresses worn with big jewellery and chunky boots. For the occasion, the designer showed off a remix of his favourite prints on mid-length dresses and pleated skirts, reminding everyone that he’s the master of unconventional colour palettes and textile combinations. Chic faux-fur boa, big blazer in fluoroscent fabric, a perfectly tailored, crisp white shirt and corduroy pants – that’s a look that says Dries, without even one logo on it. There’s no doubt why throughout those 100 collections, women fell in love with Dries over and over again. They continue to do so, as we step into the new decade.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki feauturing Alexandra Kehayoglou’s carpet. Dries Van Noten collaborated with the artist for his nature-inspired, spring-summer 2015 collection. Had a chance to experience Kehayoglou 48 metre-long masterpiece, which was the show’s setting, in Berlin thanks to Andreas Murkudis. Click here for more!

Le Nuvole. Ania Kuczyńska AW17

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Ania Kuczyńska‘s autumn-winter 2017 collection, elusively titled Le Nuvole (meaning ‘clouds’ in Italian), is a minimalist heaven at the first glace. But is it just plain minimalism? The Warsaw-based designer is known for encoding various references and  personal obsessions in her sharply cut, yet tactile garments. This season, it was a nod to her beloved Italy. Don’t associate that tip too superficially, though, as there is nothing like cliché in Kuczyńska’s creativity. Morning black coffee served in Palermo; a glass of Sicilian wine (well relates to the burgundy colour of the must-have ballet slippers); the shade of navy that resembles the Italian, night sky. Then, there’s also Monica Vitti’s ethereal grace in those silk dresses and feminine blouses. The 3/4 skirts ooze with a Luca Guadagnino film sensuality – yes, think of Tilda Swinton’s character in A Bigger Splash. The expressive silhouette of Ania’s new season pieces reflect the motion of Tarantella  – folk dance in the Southern part of Italy, characterized by a fast upbeat tempo. Although that seems like quite a lot for one collection, Kuczyńska pulls it off like no other, keeping it true to her style. The mood, the texture, the silhouette – Le Nuvole is what you call eccelente, in every aspect.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki, feauturing Wojciech Plewiński’s shot from ‘Italia ’57’ series.   Photos by Stanisław Broniecki, beauty by Marianna Yurkiewicz.

Chavs and Checks. Burberry AW17

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There’s a new, very common tendency in fashion for speeding up the sales. While in the past, that was done by launching a new perfume, today, it’s making the clothes feel Vetements (with some smaller or bigger alternations). In case of Burberry, Christopher Bailey‘s strategy was to pin-up that popularly over-sized, ‘I don’t care how I look’ style to the brand’s biggest heritage – the Burberry check – that lately wasn’t a top-seller. The bootleg power has its impact, after all, and as the current consumer fancies looking cheap, that’s a very, very good shot.

Following the successful recipe of many brands, Bailey invited the ‘cool pack’ to collaborate in the new season. So we’ve got Gosha Rubchinskiy, who has already presented a glimpse of the Burberry collab in his recent menswear collection that took place last June in Saint Petersburg. The Russian photographer, known for capturing the post-Soviet skate youth and rave scene, also contributed to Burberry’s photography exhibition, ‘Here We Are‘, curated by Alasdair McLellan. But back to the clothes: not that the overall collection was bad. Quite opposite – it was one of the best Burberry collections in a while. Lots of heavy knitwear worn over sheer dresses (lovely, rustical mood of Scottish highlands); PVC jackets in pastel pink; and of course, checks covering everything from coats to the ‘chav’ inspired caps. The effect? Sure, I took out my well-forgotten, beige scarf for a walk. Looked at it with a ‘fresh’ eye. But if taking a closer look at that Gosha-coolness of this collection, Burberry’s new-season directions says as follows: ‘desperate’.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.