Eat (and Wear) Cake. Moschino AW20

I suddenly started enjoying Jeremy Scott’s Moschino last season, when he showed the super camp intepretation of fashion-meets-art. His work lately is absolutely un-commercial, and that might be reason looking at it is so amusing. For autumn-winter 2020, he chose a total fashion cliché: Marie Antoinette. Karl Lagerfeld did a Chanel collection dedicated to her. Last season, Thom Browne had his models wear painful-looking crinolines, corsets and big hair fit for the Versailles. In Milan, Scott clashed Marie Antoinette pannier dresses with the most emblematic womenswear garment of the radical 1960s, the miniskirt. Scott’s mini pannier came in various iterations: gold brocade on denim, white biker, black biker, and toile de Jouy. This archetypally 18th-century pattern was used across the collection with the original faces of its cavorting courtiers transformed into wide-eyed anime characters. The kitschy, cake-based finale that was served was hilarious and provided total visual oversaturation with all its sweetness and icing-like details. Let them eat (and wear) cake.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Body. Mugler SS20

While Casey Cadwallader‘s Mugler tailoring and corsetry is razor sharp, it’s also unbelievably body-loving and inclusive. For spring-summer 2020, the designer made a meaningful statement: his vision of the brand isn’t just for Instagram bodies, but for all. Yes, maybe Bella Hadid opened the show (she’s the only social-media-model I like), but the clothes were represented by women of different colors, sizes and gender identities. Kembra Pfahler took a runway turn, just like Debra Shaw, Karen Elson and Hanne Gaby Odiele. And the clothes? They were great, possibly the best we’ve seen from Cadwallader throughout his time at the label. Thierry Mugler’s vintage work from the ’80s and ’90s is the key inspiration for Casey, but he doesn’t let nostalgia ruin it. Exaggerated proportions and twisted glamour continue to be super seductive thanks to the usage of performance fabrics, while keeping the aesthetic clean and sharp lets Mugler look relevant and fresh. The more daring ones may choose a cropped jacket, net corset, and derrière-lifting stockings. The ones looking for something more day-ish, yet equally empowering, please take a look at the satin trench coat, an over-sized lilac blazer or the draped pencil skirts.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.