Buly 1803 in Paris

Starting in the late 18th century, the famed “Bully”, established in 1803 on Rue Saint-Honoré in Paris, made a name for himself (which he then wore with a double consonant). At the turn of the 19th century, perfumers were still the heirs of the craftsmen from the Ancien Régime, and the keepers of their trade secrets. The fervour of perfumes followed in the wake of a fresh openness to the world and to its novel, sometimes exotic flowers – as with Joséphine de Beauharnais, who imported to France and acclimatized new olfactory species and audacities. Bully welcomed the advances of science and cosmetics to formulate his own inventions in form of perfumes and scented oils. Among these, his remarkable skin care products achieved lasting fame. Throughout the Golden Century of beauty, which witnessed the invention of the first formulations of modern cosmetics and perfumery, the ‘officine’ gradually established itself as a trend-setter.

Today, Buly 1803 is reborn in Paris, on rue Bonaparte 6 in the sixth arrondissement, with a different spelling and a refreshed concept. Visiting their boutique was like entering a cabinet de curiosités, falling hard for the opulent marble furniture, antique illustrations on the walls, and Japanese porcelain flacons costing 3000 euros and up. The revamped water-based perfume line surprises and intrigues with compositions such as Peruvian Heliotrope, Kiso Yuzu, Sevillian Brigarade or Mexican Tuberose. Buly 1803 is a true gem and it’s quite unbelievable to find brands like this in our world of fast, mass-consumption.

Photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Holly Golightly

Holly Golightly is a fashion retailer located in the heart of Copenhagen. This concepts tore features ready-to-wear from brands like Lemaire, Rosie Assoulin, Saks Potts, Dries Van Noten, The Vampire’s Wife and other labels, as well as a selection of leather goods, cosmetics (the impressive Buly 1803 shop-in-shop), fine jewellery and a finely curated selection of vintage items. The store also houses the dutch furniture brand Piet Hein Eek. The owner, Barbara Maj Husted Werner, strongly believes in personal and timeless style and aims to inspire her customers with a coalition between high-end luxury goods and hand-picked items from all around the world. The fashion retail scene in Copenhagen is truly exciting, and stores like Holly Golightly are clear reasons why. I mean, just take a look how fantastic this space is!

Borgergade 17B / Copenhagen

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

 

Buly 1803

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Starting in the late 18th century, the famed “Bully”, established in 1803 on Rue Saint-Honoré in Paris, made a name for himself (which he then wore with a double consonant). At the turn of the 19th century, perfumers were still the heirs of the craftsmen from the Ancien Régime, and the keepers of their trade secrets. The vogue of perfumes followed in the wake of a fresh openness to the world and to its novel, sometimes exotic flowers – as with Joséphine de Beauharnais, who imported to France and acclimatized new olfactory species and audacities. Bully welcomed the advances of science and cosmetics to formulate his own inventions in form of perfumes and scented oils. Among these, his remarkable skin care products achieved lasting fame. Throughout the Golden Century of beauty, which witnessed the invention of the first formulations of modern cosmetics and perfumery, the ‘officine’ gradually established itself as a trend-setter.

Today, Buly 1803 is reborn in Paris, on rue Bonaparte 6 in the sixth arrondissement, with a different spelling and a refreshed concept. Visiting their boutique was like entering a cabinet de curiosités, falling hard for the opulent marble furniture, antique illustrations on the walls, and Japanese porcelain flacons costing 3000 euros and up. Buly 1803 is a true gem and it’s quite unbelievable to find brands like this in our world of fast, mass-consumption.

Discover Buly 1803 finest products: Buly 1803 Pommade Concrète balmBuly 1803 Campagne D’italie candle & Buly 1803 tortoiseshell comb.

All photos by Edward Kanarecki