La Famiglia. Emilio Pucci Resort 2023

The resort 2023 line-up is Camille Miceli‘s next, bold chapter of Emilio Pucci‘s revival. The designer has already proven that she has a natural affinity for the brand, sharing a penchant for expressive style, glamour, joie de vivre, and a flair for travel. Tying all this together for Miceli is the idea of La Famiglia, the tight-knitted Italian lifestyle which is a kind of precursor to today’s widespread concept of community. “For me Pucci evokes a family of people spending time together, to enjoy life, parties, and well-being.” The cross-seasonal collection covered a wide-ranging spectrum of pleasurable activities – weekends on the slopes, sun-kissed holidays in seaside destinations, celebrations, and various moments of day/night fun. Miceli wants the travel-loving, generations-spanning Pucci famiglia to be dressed not only to impress, but to express the self-confidence and lust for life with which she herself is abundantly imbued. The lineup reads as a flexible, adaptable proposition, festive and mood-lifting as well as suited for an efficient, fast-paced everyday life. Miceli worked a round, egg-shaped silhouette inspired by the swirls of the blown-up archival prints she has reinterpreted. Short padded nylon puffers, midriff-baring drop-shaped foulard tops, and patineuse swinging miniskirts and blouses with ballooning sleeves all conveyed the slightly trippy roundness of Pucci’s curlicued motifs. Counterbalancing the bold all-over-printed effect, Miceli introduced optic white and deep black as eye-soothing alternatives, playing with cool proportions and alternating silhouettes, either voluminous or form-fitting. Archival stripes were a new introduction, as was gold leather, which highlighted the bold glamour Miceli is after. It was particularly appealing rendered in a shiny patchworked bolero, worn by Malgosia Bela, who was part of an age-diverse cast of beauties, whose undisputed queen was the rarely photographed, camera-shy Doris Brynner. “I’m so proud and honored she accepted to do it for us,” said a delighted Miceli, who surely scored high in having such an age-defying legend join the ever-growing Pucci famiglia.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.
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La Piazzetta. Emilio Pucci AW22

True to her Italian roots, Camille Miceli called Emilio Pucci’s winter collection La Piazzetta, hinting not only at Capri’s famous handkerchief-sized hotspot, but also at the notion of the city square as part of Italian culture, a space open to communality and connections. These values and the idea of la famiglia, another established building block of the Italian lifestyle, are the drivers Miceli is embracing to charge Pucci with a bold new energy. For her second collection for the brand, Miceli drew from her own family and circle of friends – a motley crew of characters, talents, and generations – generously sprinkling it with her abundant joie de vivre. “My Pucci woman is an urban bohemian, she loves to travel, she’s in constant movement,” she says. “It’s the mother, it’s the daughter, it’s the grandma – as long as they enjoy life, they’re part of the community of Pucci.” Festive, bold, and colorful, the collection keeps all the label’s fundamentals alive, while introducing a few novelty notes to the mix. Knitwear was a new addition, offered in a rainbow-colored capelet with an undulating hem, or in a fringed hand-knitted, patch-worked poncho worked with horizontal intarsia. Miceli said that she was “happy to have achieved something that is Pucci, without being logo-ed by the prints in a big way.” She also used black as a thread throughout the collection, using prints as pipings, side inserts, foulard ribbons, and fringes, while widening the color palette with “some more options that reflect its character without being necessarily full-on printed.” Fringes are a Miceli signature, as they “bring frivolity to the garment,” she explained. They also give the feel of the energy and glamour that is the quintessential combination of the Pucci-Miceli connection. The Pucci woman, whatever her age, is on the move, going around in activewear-inspired zippered blousons in shiny recycled nylon printed and tiny pleated printed kilts, and weathering rainy days in protective hooded waxed ponchos boasting the lysergic Marmo pattern.

Parties are the Pucci woman’s natural habitat, and Miceli wants her to shine under the discoballs. Leggings with disco ruffles are a tribute to the effervescent charm of Raffaella Carrà, an Italian showgirl famous in the ’80s who reminds the designer of her teenage years. Miceli’s affinity for the label’s high-style bohemia was conveyed in long printed chiffon dresses with ruffled décolletages, in more sinuous, body-con options wrapped in stoles, or else in leopard-printed satiny numbers – a new introduction as “Emilio only did zebra at the time,” said Miceli. Bravissimo!

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.
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La Grotta Azzura. Emilio Pucci AW22

Emilio Pucci is one of these Italian luxury brands that have a rich, idiosyncratic legacy and a full package of well-known style codes, but somehow a number of contemporary designers that took it under their wings in the last couple of years never could put their finger on it. Maybe expect for Peter Dundas, whose ultra-sexy, jet-set nomad vision put Pucci on a very specific shelf of glossy Real-Housewives-kind-of clients. And then, suddenly, Camille Miceli arrived to this kaleidoscope-printed world in 2021. Her debut collection, entitled La Grotta Azzurra, is an optimistic start of the new Pucci chapter.

The designer touched down in Capri – Marchese Emilio Pucci’s beloved holiday destination – this week with her launch collection, making a splash in the late-April waters with an intense “experience” enjoyed by 160 guests flown in from Paris, Milan, and London. The US contingent was represented by the rapper Gunna, whose performance capped off three Pucci-fied days of activations and dolce vita – decadent dinners and hours-long lunches at Bagni di Tiberio; morning yoga classes for stylish Pucci yoginis; and “how-to-style-a-scarf” lessons in the label’s store on Via Camerelle. The see-now, buy-now collection was presented live in various tableaux vivants throughout the island, with Pucci-clad models looking very Slim Aarons in the surroundings. “Pucci isn’t a conceptual brand, it’s a lifestyle brand, so its message has to be direct,” she said. For Miceli it means energizing it further, amping up the joie de vivre factor already embedded in its codes. Energy is an attractive trans-generational attitude, and permeating the label with a positive, slightly trippy vibe will help engage for a wider, younger audience. Miceli also highlighted what she called Pucci’s “humanity and peculiar sensibility,” which she enhanced, for example, by creating hand-drawn iterations of the famous prints. “I think that digitized patterns strip Pucci’s motifs of the imperfections that are part of their unique charm,” she explained. In the new collection, which is full of simple (and at points simply plain, like all the active-wear), casual separates, the patterns’ pyrotechnics are offset by the use of few solid colors. Being a skilled accessories designer, Miceli has cleverly expanded the offer, working around the shape of two interlocked little fishes, playfully replicating the P in Pucci. The designer had it tranlated into enameled bracelets and metallic necklaces; into the outlined rubber soles of funny flip flops; into buckles decorating wooden clogs and high-shine platforms; and into a cute bag shaped like a fish. The Pucci reboot will proceed along a non-seasonal cadence. “The idea of season is démodée,” Miceli said, so jumping on the fashion show merry-go-round isn’t on the agenda yet. “It’s easy to have models walking a catwalk, but this see-now, buy-now formula with monthly new drops keeps you on your toes, creatively speaking, as you have to constantly find new ideas to engage the customers.” Rarely this strategy worked for other brands, but for Pucci – which largely is a “resort” label – that might the right path.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

NET-A-PORTER Limited