Bourgeois Woman. Celine AW19

Second season at Celine, and Hedi Slimane doesn’t cease to spark controversy and polarize the viewer: you either love or hate what he’s doing. This review’s going to be a bit different than usual, though. I really want to share a sort of ping-pong chat we’ve had with Jennifer (@readysetfashion), the visual merchandising manager at Blake and fashion magazine / print collector (take a look at her other account, @aparticularissue…), regarding Slimane’s autumn-winter 2019 collection. First, you’ve got to know that the designer took a 180 degree turn from his youthful, Parisian clubbing fashion we’ve had to witness last season (I still hate it!). He went to the maison’s archives and came back with a very literal reference: the 70s Celine, just as it was, suited for French, bourgeois woman. Knee-length, country-checked skirts, shoulder bags with horse-bit details, silk blouses, whiskered jeans, logo-print scarves, long boots… this woman isn’t here for partying. She’s off to Biarritz, Deauville or other ultimately French destination. From one side, it’s a collection filled with classics – classics that will always stay afloat forever. But from another side, it’s just so creatively absent. I’m utterly on fence with it. But back to my and Jen’s conversation. So, here’s how it went…

JEN: The question is does he have the right timing. I don’t see anywhere on the planet women wanting to dress like this today.

ED: I was thinking about this now. Do we really, really need it? Ok, he turned to the archives… but what now? We’re in 2019, not in the 70s after all.

JEN: Exactly. Shop at A.P.C. for cooler version of this look. Also, he can bookmark a decade like a champ. That is why people use Pinterest…

ED: LOVE THE PINTEREST PART! By the way, I had A.P.C. on my mind too. Jean Touitou does this 70s chic for seasons, wait, for decades! But he keeps it affordable and not so fussy.

JEN: I think it’s weird that everyone did an about-face with Hedi at Celine. That’s sort of scary. What does that say about today’s industry?

ED: Maybe that it’s fine to say something critical in the first place, yes. But when you’ve seen enough of it in advertising and are still invited to the show, you just have to be like: “j’adore!” Which is really sad in a way, because it’s always like that, in everything. Or maybe it’s Hedi who secretly manipulates people’s minds? Don’t know…

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.