Beautiful Consistence. APC AW19

This was a classic A.P.C. presentation, with a few plot twists. Jean Toitou invited two collaborators for autumn-winter 2019 collection: Brain Dead, an Los Angeles–based streetwear brand, and Suzanne Koller, the house’s longtime stylist and Parisian friend. The first created graphic hoodies based on the 1972 documentary, Future Shock, in which Orson Welles, playing narrator, discusses how technology is moving too fast for humans to keep up. Koller, the fashion director of M Le Monde and Self Service, designed the collection’s black wool dress (worn by her currently favourite blond, Maggie Mauer) and an oversize parka that she teamed with a monochrome look in gray: chunky sweater, turtleneck, wool trousers, and leather boots. During his speech, Touitou joked, “Maybe you can guess which pieces are hers.” Knowing her style and work, you could think of Koller right away, even not knowing about A.P.C.’s collab.  A.P.C. values consistence, which seems like the best advise for any brand doing shows in Paris. And their eventual ‘surprises’ make this consistence even more beautiful.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Light. Nina Ricci AW19

Paris saw two debuts at historic maisons that were originally found by women. The first was a proper, but mild restart at Lanvin by Bruno Sialelli. The second appeared to be at Nina Ricci, where Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh took the role of creative directors. The couple have a menswear label, Botter, whose oversize tailoring and energetic humor caught the attention of the fashion world last year, made them LVMH Prize finalists and scored a top design award at the Festival d’Hyères. They’ve never designed womenswear, but LVMH gave them a blank page. So you could actually expect anything. The designers decided to play rather safe and referred to Ricci herself, whose fashion was roamntic, airy and light. Rushemy and Lisi cleared the garments of any unneeded details, like lace or embroideries, and delived a line-up of minimalist, yet feminine silhhouettes. There were organza tops and flowing gowns, but we’ve also had beautifully constructed suits and over-sized shirting. For me, this collection lacked the intrigue that Guillaume Henry (Botter and Herrebrugh’s precedessor that parted ways with the brand quite abruptly) delivered to the brand. But I’m paying attention to what’s coming from the new creative directors in the near future.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.