Big in Japan. Louis Vuitton Resort’18

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This is what you call a show. Chanel did a faux Ancient Greece venue at Parisian Grand Palais; Prada took us to Galleria Vittorio Emmanuelle’s attic; Dior had its guests see the show in the middle of a Californian canyon. But Nicolas Ghesquiere, and his team at Louis Vuitton, outdid himself. Again. The Miho Museum, a half-hour drive from Kyoto, is one of the most spectacular and out-of-this-world buildings in the world. Designed by I.M. Pei, the architecture of this place reminds you of some utopian space odyssey – and that’s precisely what Nicolas wanted to achieve, sending down a line of futuristic silhouettes with equally futuristic setting in the backdrop.

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*1,2,3. Territory by The Blaze, Indestructible by Robyn (remixed). Just wow.*

Continuing to love Japan and its culture, the creative designer of the French maison did an impressive job in conveying his long-term relation with the country. He found just the right balance, not falling into oriental stereotypes, and what’s worse, cultural appropriation (a frequent problem among other designers). Those were the modern-day, badass attitude samurai girls, wearing over-sized biker jackets with leopard prints, skater shorts and weaved leather vests. Kansai Yamamoto was on Ghesquiere’s mind while designing the collection – that’s the Japanese designer, who dressed David Bowie in glittering jumpsuits and paved the way for Yohji Yamamoto and Kenzo Takada few decades ago in Paris. Now, his bold, artistic legacy gets a revamp according to Vuitton codes. Handbags with Kabuki eyes, prints of local fishermen, a variety of toned colour combinations: Japanese avant-garde of the late 20th century goes slightly more French, more refined. In an effortless, loose way. The collection, in overall, has something of Ghesquiere’s early Balenciaga days. But the designer has already established his language at Louis Vuitton – so it feels just the right way.

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Beach, Lips and Jeanne.

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Jeanne Damas is the synonym of today’s Parisian woman. She reflects contemporary French chic and stays far from a book-writing cliché. No, she’s not a Frenchie wannabe with a baguette, a là the ones you see all over your Instagram explore page. In other words, when I hear ‘Jeanne’, I simultaneously think ‘Jane’, ‘Françoise’, ‘Isabelle’. If you know what I mean…

Now, after a brief moment of admiration for Jean, here’s the thing. Rouje is her womenswear label and it’s a love letter to flirty dresses, romantic floral shirts and high-waisted denim. Spring-summer 2017 is Jeanne’s second season and it has just dropped on her on-lineon-line page, accompanied by dreamy, Mediterrean-hot look-book (starring the designer and her friends). Red-lips, a fruit market near the shore and vintage sunglasses: oui, it’s perfect.

Throwback Sunday – Céline Pre-Fall’10

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When you come to a certain conclusion that her 2010 pieces for Céline would look perfect in 2017: that’s the power of Phoebe Philo‘s fashion. Those masculine, mid-lenght coats; beige cardigans with leather pockets; evening tops with feather inserts. It’s hard not to love the flared pants or this simple, little black dress styled with red tights. Pre-Fall 2010 was her third collection for the French house and it’s interesting to observe how she incorporated some of the brand’s heritage codes. The knit with a vintage automobile print used to be Céline Vipiana’s long-time signature, while the belt buckles had the brand’s old logo on them.

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Permanent. Céline AW17

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For her autumn-winter 2017 fashion show, Phoebe Philo invited Philippe Parreno to create an abstract, fully rotating venue. The eclectic set was the ultimate sign of what to expect from Céline this season – contrasts. Philo has those moments in her career, when she goes extremely arty, and then, strictly minimal. This time, it was both – sharp masculine blazers and white crisp shirts were harmoniously balanced with incredibly big blankets carried by the models and rain-coats with map of Paris printed all over them. But it doesn’t matter whether we’re speaking of a classical, black coat, or long-sleeved dress in burgundy – it was all about comfort combined with a kind of elusive sensuality. Flowing, maxi-dresses and fringed skirts were worn by the models as if they weren’t on a fashion show, but on the street. Surprisingly, Philo went for something more simple in case of shoes, switching from the two-colour heels of the last season. Semi-cowboy boots, ballet pumps, flats, all in earthy tones. Just like the bags, which will carry anything. Those clothes are permanent: they are here to serve for years.

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