Papier x Rosie Assoulin

I looooove beautiful stationery! Papier teams up with brilliant creatives, artists and illustrators to deliver the most gorgeous designs. New York-based designer Rosie Assoulin knows whimsy and color. She’s  an expert at creating both – exuberant eveningwear and versatile, everyday pieces imbued with emotion and energy. For her first ever stationery collection, exclusive to Papier, the designer shares favorite watercolor prints from her fashion collections (all hand-painted by Rosie herself!). Vibrant paisley patterns, fluid brushstrokes, picnic plaids, fresh florals – so many reasons to relax, be free and smile at your desk. “There’s such a romance that comes from writing notes to your loved ones (or yourself) on paper and I’m excited to be able to foster and invigorate the meaningful connections that stationery helps facilitate. The colors and organic prints bring me such joy – something I think we can all use a little more of these days!” So, if you’re looking for the perfect gift for your a family member or a friend, there’s still some time to pick from the prettiest notebooks, 2021 planners and notecard sets! And yes, to make it even more personal, you can easily customize them with the name of your loved one.

Discover the collection here! And for more of Rosie, click here to look back at some of my past posts.

Saved NY. A Warm Friend!

If I had a chance to go back to New York, I think I would need a month to visit all the places I Insta-love in this city. One of them is SAVED NY – the ultimate heaven for all things soft and truly, truly beautiful. The founder of the brand is Sean McNanney, the Brooklyn-based artist and designer. He realized his dream of creating a line of luxury blankets with the introduction of his first collection in 2015 after working for Ralph Lauren Home. Since that time, SAVED NY has gradually grown, expanding from cashmere soft goods for the home to a fashion line including multiple collaborations with artists and designers around the globe – from Richard Haines to Andrea Zanatelli. Along with Sean’s passion for design is his belief that he can create a quality product using sustainable materials and following fair trade practices. He has great reverence for the traditions of Mongolian nomadic culture and works closely with the people involved: from the herders to the artisans. Each item is hand-crafted in fine, sustainably sourced Mongolian cashmere, camelhair and yak down. The SAVED NY label is a unique marriage of old-world craftsmanship and modern sensibility. Sean’s designs are influenced by a lifetime of collecting objects, textiles and ephemera from around the world – no wonder why some of his most delightful designs make you think of the art of cabinet des curiosités. Designed to be an instant heirloom, loyal and lasting – “a warm friend“. Make sure to follow SAVED NY on Instagram and check out their gorgeous on-line shop, which as well presents all their collections. Big shout-out to dear Ellen (@ellencareyseedinc), thanks to whom I discovered this brand!

Collage by Edward Kanarecki, all photos sourced from SAVED NY’s site.

Junya Watanabe’s Techno Couture

Pre-Instagram times, a collection worth thousands of posts (and unforgettable, eye-catchy content…). Back in 2000, Junya Watanabe presented one of his most ethereal collections ever. At first glance, the honeycomb ruffs Watanabe showed in his “Techno Couture” line-up called to mind those seen in Rembrandt portraits. Well, not exactly: those starched confections couldn’t fold and be stored in an envelope, like Watanabe’s ground-breaking designs. They certainly weren’t made of a “techno” fabric like polyester chiffon, from which the designer created his exaggerated take on the ruff, transforming it from an accessory to a garment with an organic-meets-space-age aesthetic. The material might have been unknown in Rembrandt’s time, but its method of production – hand sewing – certainly was. In the above collage, some of my favourites looks from the collection interact with Malwina Konopacka‘s “Forms” collection of ceramic tableware.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki, ceramics and photo by Malwina Konopacka.

Fondation Louis Vuitton

I finally had the time to visit Fondation Louis Vuitton during my recent stay in Paris. Surrounded by the greenery of Bois de Boulogne, this place really does stun with its view. At the beginning of March, no particular art exhibition was taking place here – just the sole experience of Frank Gehry’s architecture. Bathed in natural daylight from the skylight, the exhibition “An Architectural Journey” was like a walk inside of a living organism. Prepared in collaboration with Frank Gehry’s teams in Los Angeles, the exhibition proposed an open itinerary for visitors. Like the building itself, which offers multiple possible paths, you could easily get lost in all the wings and sails of the construction – but somehow, this was a kind of pleasure to explore it without a plan. The visual experience offered a vision of the building’s striking beauty, as well as its technological complexity. Definitely worth a visit, even though getting there takes a while.

8 Avenue du Mahatma Gandhi

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

(P.S. If you are inspired by my Parisian coverage, I’m really happy about, but please have in mind that now isn’t a safe time for any sorts of travelling. Stay at home!)

Saint Laurent Rive Droite

The place where the Colette once used to be, now is the location for Saint Laurent Rive Droite. Thought up as a retail destination, it’s the concept store curated by Saint Laurent’s creative director Anthony Vaccarello. The Rive Droite name takes its inspiration from Saint Laurent’s Rive Gauche, the line that introduced Yves’s unique way of combining prêt-à-porter and luxury fashion with the opening of his first boutique in Paris back in 1966. The store space is built around the idea of a cultural experience, showcased through different events such as exhibitions, performances and artistic exchanges. The products on sale are also exclusive to the space, offering rare books, vintage record players, condoms, skate-boards and toy cars. I went there to see what all the buzz is about. It’s a chic store, filled with French design classics and gorgeous clothes, that’s for sure. But then, it feels like another YSL store. So when I read that “it’s better than Colette”… well, it’s definitely not.

213 rue saint Honoré

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

(P.S. If you are inspired by my Parisian coverage, I’m really happy about, but please have in mind that now isn’t a safe time for any sorts of travelling. Stay at home!)