Mask Up!

Marine Serre

New lockdown is hitting Poland (just as many other countries in Europe) and I can’t help, but wonder… why just about ten brands come to my mind with masks (or any other accessory that has something to do with provisional face-covering) for spring-summer 2021? I honestly though every third brand would do a mask, even the simplest one, without a commercial plot behind it. I realise brands and designers might not find mask aesthetically pleasing (I don’t, for instance), but it’s such a statement of our times, a symbol. An ultimate necessity, most of all. A sign that you’ve got a brain and care for others. Even one mask in the collection already makes a difference, brings this super important stance to the front. And this fashion month, it was so awkward to see all designers taking a bow in their masks, while the models were just out there, wearing clothes, as if it’s business as usual… here are some brands (a minority!) that at least tried to bite into the masks/face-coverings repertoire:

Rick Owens

Schiaparelli

Maison Margiela

Eckhaus Latta

Imitation of Christ

Balenciaga

(Ok, this isn’t a mask, but if you happen to forget yours… cover your face with whatever you’ve got! A turtleneck is very convenient).

Kenzo

So, here’s a reminder: please, please, please, MASK UP!

/

All collages by Edward Kanarecki.

Walk That Walk. Eckhaus Latta SS21

I loved Eckhaus Latta‘s spring-summer 2021 collection for its honesty and rawness. Walking became, thanks to COVID, pretty much everyone’s primary outdoor activity these days. As a parallel to that, the show celebrated this fact. It was staged outdoors, underneath a section of New York’s FDR Drive where a long, straight jogging path provided a runway, and with a bare minimum of fuss: hair au naturel, model-applied makeup, no soundtrack, just an abbreviated collection and the train rumbling by now and then. “We wanted it to feel, like, no spectacle,Mike Eckhaus explained after the show. “Like the models could just be going out for a walk with their friends.” The clothes matched that easygoing manner. There were stylish sweats, of course, but also baggy jeans and knit suiting and gingham tops with the airiness of wind-borne kites. The most fitted looks were knit and the most tailored were done of featherweight nylon, the material often patchworked together in tonal color blocks. These were casual items, but every garment seemed to have been hand-worked, and that gave this collection a bit of emotional undertow; in a socially distanced era, it felt as though Eckhaus and Zoe Latta were communicating touch through their clothes. That was true of the collection’s ornate crochets, but it was also true of the hand-dyed jeans and the burnout florals. Smart, authentic, durable clothes for the new reality.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.