On Power Dressing. Acne Studios AW19

For autumn-winter 2019, Acne Studios’ designer, Jonny Johansson, considered what’s high fashion from the perspective of young people, and how it might change throughout time. “All the power dressing that I consider iconic womenswear, maybe they are attracted to it, but in a different way.” While doing the research, he also thoroughly examined Helmut Newton’s eternally chic photographs, and was amazed with the fact that those visuals are so relevant, and not getting old – even a day. All this gave birth to a collection, that’s quite different to Acne Studios we’ve seen in the last few seasons. Oversize pants were cinched at the waist and tucked into socks; coats had those refined-looking, rounded shoulders; draping, probably never seen at Acne before, looked sublime. The new season silhouette is sharp and chic, but there were also elements that felt distinct to the brand’s aesthetic: knits with raw finishings, eclectic jewellery (those XXL bracelets are gorgeous) and, other than the very seductive, Newton-ish pumps, heavy trekking boots. Worn with one of the statuesque blazers or a collared ‘office’ midi-dress, the elegant-slash-off-duty look would exactly be what Johansson worked on this time: power dressing, fitted for a contemporary woman.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Between Art & Fashion

Carla-Sozzani-and-Helmut-Newton1

Carla Sozzani, former editor-in-chief of the Italian Elle and Vogue, has collected photographs for many years. Since 1990, she has also exhibited these works in her Corso Como 10 in Milan in close cooperation with numerous internationally renowned photographers – including Helmut Newton. The personal friendship between Carla and Helmut not only led to countless exhibitions, but also to the current presentation of her multifaceted photography collection at the Helmut Newton Foundation in Berlin, under the title Between Art & Fashion.

More than 220 photographs were selected from the collection (which actually comprises almost 1,000 works!). The exhibition not only presents numerous icons, it also contains plenty of rare surprises. Some of photographers are represented with only a single work, while for others there is a small group of photographs (like the mega-wall by Steven Meisel). The selection is not about completeness, but authenticity and visualization, about the quality of autonomous and representative images – in this case thematically adapted to the specific exhibition venue.

On display in June Newton’s room, on the occasion of the 95th birthday of Helmut’s wife, who worked under the name Alice Springs, are 22 previously unseen portraits – Yves, Azzedine, Karl, Vivienne are all here. But it’s also worth visiting the pernament exhibition on the ground floor, which features Helmut Newton’s office room display, posters, his wardrobe and favourite (and sexy, which isn’t shocking knowing Newton’s body of work) objects.

The exhibition is open until November 18th, 2018.

Helmut Newton Foundation / Jebenstraße 2 / Berlin

SSENSE

TBT: Dolce & Gabbana AW04

tumblr_o0ysgk0Xe31uqlov4o1_1280

Today, looking at a Dolce & Gabbana show hurts. The brand’s recent strategy to lure rich millenials through casting Instagram stars for their runway is, politely saying, ridiculous. Also, I don’t feel like writing much about Domenico and Stefano‘s pride in dressing America’s First Lady, or the latter’s drive for dramas and beefs on social media. But, even though it’s hard to believe it in 2017, Dolce & Gabbana used to do fashion. And really good fashion. Autumn-winter 2004 season is a great example of that. Inspired with Helmut Newton’s photographs and muses, the designer’s collection was about a hedonistic, ultra-chic, dramatic, yet powerful woman. Lots of sheerness, romantic lace, sassy fur, seductive satin – that was extremely Dee-Gee at the beginning of the millennium.  The models – from Stella Tennant and Mariacarla Boscono to Nadja Auermann and Karen Elson – killed the audience with their walks.

Visual Privilege of Polly Mellen

355714070537964256_lcwzbjbh_c

Twiggy photographed by Richard Avedon and styled by Polly Mellen, Vogue, July 1967.

After reading System’s incredible interview with 92-year old Polly Mellen (former fashion editor of Harper’s Bazaar, American Vogue and Allure), I realised how boring fashion is today. Those were the days, when Polly took Veruschka to Japan for five weeks and made the most expensive editorial in Vogue’s history; when Leslie Winer and Jean Michel Basquiat made out at Irving Penn’s studio; when Mellen and Avedon worked with Nasstasja Kinski, who willingly posed with a snake on her naked body. The way Polly describes this experience to Jonathan Wingfield is equally emotive: now, I don’t know if you’ve ever held a snake… it is so erotic, you cannot imagine, it’s like holding your lover’s penis, it really is. Truly, I found reading this feauture inspiring and gripping like an adventure book – Mellen’s life is, as she describes, a ‘visual privilege’.

b32706e689bd23601e2a10a15882e59a

Nastassja Kinski photographed by Richard Avedon and styled by Polly Mellen.

b0d49134185355db6d5a9a207293605b

Veruschka photographed by Richard Avedon and styled by Polly Mellen, Vogue, 1966.

36_04819fa0-2c1c-492d-982d-29c5d74de3cd

Veruschka photographed by Richard Avedon and styled by Polly Mellen, Vogue, 1966.

FullSizeRender

Jerry Hall photographed by Helmut Newton and styled by Polly Mellen, Vogue, October 1974.

img-polly-mollen-5_105544935222

Unpublished, photographed by Steven Klein and styled by Polly Mellen, 1997.