Serendipity. Lauren Manoogian Resort 2021

Switching from digital couture to one of the most heavenly labels in New York – Lauren Manoogian. For resort 2021, the designer’s earthy, tonal, and textural designs go side by side with her sculptural, wabi-sabi knits and accessories. Due to the pandemic, Manoogian was confined to her studio in Brooklyn and as such, her lineup, based on some greatest hits and forgotten gems from her archive, had to be captured with a more localized, low-key approach – no architectural backgrounds as usual. She hired two models, one that came in the morning and one in the afternoon, and photographed the clothes inside the studio with natural light and a backdrop made from items she picked up at the local hardware store. The finished images are unretouched, further emphasizing the organic look and feel of Manoogian’s new pieces. Soft blue and gray turtleneck dresses and bouclé blanket capes looked right at home in the serene, natural setting of Manoogian’s at-home studio. So too did the roomy, oversized trousers, cozy cardigans, and voluminous robes. Manoogian’s designs are grounding and unfussy but still striking, ideal for uncertain times like ours. The knis really speaks for itself, simple and timeless.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Focus On: Victor Glemaud

In support for the Black community, I continue celebrating and highlighting the talented individuals that shape fashion today. Take notes! Haitian-born, New York-based designer Victor Glemaud launched his eponymous leisurewear collection of statement knitwear, designed for all people, genders, races, sizes and personalities, marrying comfort and style, in 2006. The designer was a finalist in the 2017 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund and honored for his achievements by the Ambassador of Haiti to the United States. For his recent collection – autumn-winter 2020 – Victor used three materials: merino wool, cotton cashmere, and a merino-cotton-ramie blend. Glemaud’s unparalleled sense of color makes his knitted garments even more compelling. A lavender-tomato back-to-front knit set is a highlight. Within his ringer midi dresses and pooling flares are a variety of stitched details that amplify the power of his clothes. His coats, actually fully knit, have the weigh and potency of felted wool. But the best thing Glemaud did on his runway (his first) was show his clothing on a glamorous cast of people of all types. As his turban-clad models – an homage to both his friend Camilla Staerk and the women he grew up with – sauntered around a lounge in the SoHo Grand hotel, audience members could be heard whispering, picking out a must-have pant or bolero sweater. That kind of inclusivity translates to real customers who will be delighted at the prospect of wearing a square-neck minidress with Nike sneakers. Looking back at his previous collections, the autumn-winter 2019 look-book starring Indya Moore, the incredible trans actress from Pose, makes you dream of all the tangerine knits. Pre-fall 2020 has seen Glemaud leaning into his grooviest, hip-swiveling impulses, filled with gorgeous crochet dresses, tunics, and flares. Discover Glemaud’s universe here.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki, photos of Victor Glemaud‘s looks from autumn-winter 2020, pre-fall 2020 and autumn-winter 2019.

Timeless, Artisan and Beautiful. Tuinch SS20

I’ve discovered Veronique Vermussche‘s label Tuinch last season and I tell you, this is love at first sight! Each season, Vermussche travels from Belgium, where she lives, to the mountains of Kashmir and Tibet on to procure world-class cashmere from local artisans she’s built long-standing relationships with. For spring-summer 2020, meet some of the most luxurious knitwear goods you’ve ever seen. The collection brings hand-knitted skirts and dresses to the line-up of timeless sweaters that will serve you for years to come. The open-weave wrap-knit sarong skirt, complete with leather detailing, is the collection’s biggest highlight, just as the tasseled cotton-wool cape. It’s a summer look-book, so no wonder why the designer tries mixing linen and silks with her ribbed cashmere knits and wool maxi dresses. The warm, earthy colour palette is eventually contrasted with pastel shades that pop up in the details. Artisan, top notch quality and seasonless: that’s sustainability, too.
Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Extreme Cashmere

Every so often a label appears out of nowhere that piques my interest. Well, in case of Extreme Cashmere, it made me completely, completely fall in love. This is what I want to have in my wardrobe, starting from September: a cashmere t-shirt (in all colours possible), a cashmere pullover in khaki, a pair of cashmere wide-legged trousers with elastic waistband in light grey. Shortly speaking, I want all my wardrobe classics in cashmere, and specifically in this over-sized, all-time friendly silhouettes Extreme Cashmere offers.

Since its founding in 2016, this Amsterdam-based brand has been dedicated to creating and producing the ultimate cashmere wardrobe for everybody and every body. The brand follows a clear aesthetic of reinvented classic styles in surprising colours and shapes, unisex and unisize, suited for all seasons and all occasions, austere yet playful, designed to be used and loved for a long time. Extreme Cashmere articulates one ever-evolving and seasonless collection that continuously gets refined, redefined and altered. Four times a year an ‘edition’ of fifteen styles that offer new knits, colours and designs are presented and added to the collection. The brand’s uncompromising focus on establishing styles with a long-lasting nature is also reflected in the sole use of cashmere stretch of the best quality available against a fair price (stop here: comparing to The Row’s cashmere goods, those prices are quite level-headed). Oh my, how can something look (and surely feel) so fleecy and fluffy, and simultaneously look aesthetically pleasing?

I know you will love this heaven. Discover the brand here.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki; all photos via the brand’s site and Instagram.