Men’s – Collector. Bode AW19

It’s official: I want to wear Bode for the rest of my life. Taking home one of the two CFDA runner-up prizes in 2018 let Emily Bode expand her truly amazing menswear brand. But still, she keeps it true to her slow fashion philosophy. Bode is actually the only brand I’m looking forward to each season during the sleepy men’s New York fashion week. She knows what the boys want, plus, the designer is praised for her sustainable practices and focus on beautifully curated craftsmanship. The autumn-winter 2019 collection is dedicated to all the collectors, who just love gathering paraphernalia (basically, me). The band of long-haired boys played soft rock tunes during the presentation, while the venue (a garage/warehouse) was filled with tour posters and hand-picked vintage furniture. Bode can make wonders out of anything.  PVC raincoats embedded with pennies and milk bottle caps. Velvet suiting made out of patchwork, each piece completely different. Hand-illustrated corduroy jackets. By styling those unique clothes with fluffy mittens, Himalayan caps and furry baboosh slippers, the overall mood is somewhere between a chic nomad and a cozy guy with a soft spot for handicraft. Big yes.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s – Fire at Pitti Uomo. Y/Project AW19

It’s just the beginning of 2019, and we’re already talking about a fashion week. While men’s London fashion week simply seemed to be there, somewhere in the background – with such exceptions as Charles Jeffrey Loverboy’s phenomenal spectacle – the new season takes a more interesting path in Italy, in Florence specifically. Pitti Uomo invited Y/Project, the Paris-based label nailing modern-day nonchalance, to present its collection in Tuscany’s magical capital. Glenn Martens took his guests to the Cloister Grade of Santa Maria Novella, and the result was… fire. Indeed, Martens mastered his distinct touches, like distorted proportions, too-short-here-too-long-there volumes and texture clashes to a perfection of its kind, and we know it looking at his previous collections. But the autumn-winter 2019 outing for guys (and pre-fall 2019 for women) goes darker than usual, even slightly dramatic I would say. And we’re not speaking about couture-ish embroideries and ball-gowns. No. But the way the designer tailors a trench-coat, shapes a velvet jacket or elongates a chunky knit is extremely vivid. Those garments leave and breathe! And Glenn evidently experiments with that feeling of clothes in motion. I also loved how Martens injected this flea-market edginess to his new season offering: (faux) fur stoles and floor-sweeping coats looked like stolen from your grandma, while hand-picked Persian rugs were worn as belts and scarves. The vocabulary of Y/Project grows, but  you’re well aware that it’s the same soul. Whether it’s in a off-beat, Parisian location or in one of Florence’s most exquisite churches.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s / Seducing. Berluti AW18

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Let’s start from a very abstract concept. If Phoebe Philo decided on menswear (something Hedi Slimane has done a few days ago – read the news, if you still haven’t…) during her tenure at Céline, she would have chosen Haider Ackermann to do it – that’s for sure, looking at his latest offering for Berluti. It’s heavenly. It’s precisely what seduces me in menswear. Those soft cuts, colours. Not speaking of the jaw-dropping materials used. Just take a glance at the butter-y leather cognac coat or the pastel blue (!) pants. Or that luxe shearling. I really don’t need anything else in life. The ‘borrowed from men’ women’s line also has lots to love about it – from Stella Tennant walking down the pale pink runway to that one grey suit that is pure perfection. This might be my ultimate favourite of the men’s autumn-winter 2018 season.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s / William Blake. Ann Demeulemeester AW18

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Ann Demeulemeester certainly is one of the most poetic designers / labels, and Sébastien Meunier is fully aware of that. A poetry reference, in form of William Blake, could happen to be too literal. But, the result is just the right balance of the house references, poetic ‘way of dressing’ and Meunier’s personal romantic aesthetic. In adopting the British Romantic’s work for Demeulemeester, the designer composed a collection that was more than just clothes. Those were the emotions, as well. Having been most moved by Songs of Innocence and of Experience, he featured the book’s cover on a velvet-ribboned tank top worn with a velvet shirt and skinny, black pants. Loose sleeves, ‘undone’ shearling coats and tasselled belts were another details, noticeable in between the lines, of Sébastien’s smooth direction at the Belgian brand.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.