Men’s The Row


The moment when The Row announced its menswear line, my heart skipped a beat. It was quite clear from the very first moment that the men’s wardrobe in Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen‘s viewpoint will be as refined as their women’s The Row. The look-book images that got released on the brand’s new website are even better than what you’ve been expecting. The idea behind the men’s The Row is deeply rooted in the label’s initial concept – and its actual name. The Row takes its name from the London street known for men’s tailoring, Savile Row, and from its inception the understated label has prided itself on its superior fabrics and exceptional craftsmanship. The collection showcases the designers’ signature ability to take classic styles and transform them into modern masterpieces via design nuances that make the brand so special. Ashley and Mary-Kate were inspired by men’s minimalist styles of the ‘80s and ‘90s in New York, elevated through traditional European hand-stitching techniques and Japanese construction. Black turtlenecks, crisp shirting, subtly tailored pants, dreamy coats… the price tags might be deadly (a camel coat 4,250 euros), but those are investment pieces. Real, and big, investments.

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Men’s – Dream State. Loewe SS20

Jonathan Anderson continues his escapist formula at Loewe and it keeps on surprising. Spring-summer 2020 collection for men was like a picture of spiritual escape into what he called “a childlike dream state”. The outing felt like a peaceful march of modern day hippies, wearing the intentionally unmatching accessories, flowing, gender-fluid kaftan-dresses and fleecy, feather-light knits. Eclecticism and handmade crafts are one of the most important qualities Anderson nurtures at Loewe, and with his collage-y sensibility for styling, he makes it sophisticated, yet desirable at the same time. You want to dress in this spirit, all year round. “We have to be aware of what’s going on in the world, but sometimes it’s good to dream. Why should people not be in a fantasy state? Maybe they’ll find something.” Words to live by.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s – Classics. Lemaire SS20

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When so much is going on in menswear (especially this season), there might be a need for something classic. In this case, you can’t go wrong with Lemaire. Christophe Lemaire and Sarah Linh Tran‘s spring-summer 2020 look-book is the perfect balance of softened workwear and tailored essentials, all kept in a colour palette of powdery, earthy tones. Shirting and loose tops came in prints produced in collaboration with a marbling designer, originally a specialist on bookmaking. The collection subtly nodded to Rüdiger Vogler in 1974’s Wim Wenders film Alice in the Cities, but even not knowing that, you’re completely convinced by this line-up. That’s the power of Lemaire – references are low-key, uninvasive, and you’re focused on the clothes.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s – Archi-Fluidity. Dries Van Noten SS20

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After a quite melancholic winter season for both men and women, Dries Van Noten is back with vibrant, energetic and very hot collection for spring-summer 2020. “It’s about ‘archi-fluidity.’ So, it’s a fluidity of archetypes of men and of garments. . . it’s all the typical elements that you know, like jeans, army pants, businessmen’s suits, soldier outfits—all those different things which are mixed in a very unconventional way, looking a lot to ’80s movies like Fassbinder’s ‘Querelle’, or even earlier things like ‘Pink Narcissus’.” He had it all, from sultry leopard prints and bold fuchsia to tropical florals and camo. There was leather, there was mesh, there were chains. Tailored blazers with short shorts are more than welcome. Seeing this collection, I can hear Lana Del Rey’s Sublime cover of Doin’ Time song in my mind…

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.