The Gift Guide for Him – Be Bold

Husbands tweed blazer, Wales Bonner velvet shirt & Moncler x JW Anderson tote

This year, I’ve decided to create dream gift guides that might make it easier for you to go (and filter) through the festive season. Get ready for a selection of beautiful items that will spark joy and last for years. The ones that will certainly please one’s senses and deliver heavenly feelings. Treat your loved ones and yourself! Here’s the curated edit of the most covetable delights, for him, which are all about being feeling bold and chic.

Quilt and Patch. For a few season now, Emily Adams Bode’ eponymous, New York-based label storms menswear, whether it’s Harry Styles wearing Bode corduroy pants or Ezra Miller wearing a full look on the red carpet. One of the brand’s signature, quilted jackets is high up on my wishlist for Santa.

BODE X Browns 50 string quilted jacket

Groovy and Cozy. Yes, your stay-at-home uniform can be as good as a eee-Lite song.

Acne Studios dinosaur-print sweatshirt, Jacquemus Soleil squared-frame sunglasses, Jil Sander sandals, Saint Laurent leopard print card holder & Dries Van Noten floral tote

Big & Chunky Knit. Dries Van Noten certainly knows how to make you drool over a knit.

Dries Van Noten green wool sweater and Dries Van Noten orange wool sweater

Modern Dandy. Break conventions and play with the notions of elegance. Elevated classics that will never get boring.

Casablanca x Browns 50 graphic-print bermuda shorts, Marni red loafers, Prada geometric-print shirt, Casablanca orange print scarf & Maison Margiela socks

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TASCHEN

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Loewe x Ken Price. Just in time for Christmas, Loewe has dropped a new art capsule. Ken Price (1935 – 2012) was a Californian artist, born and raised in Los Angeles, whose esoteric style defied categorization. Calling on eclectic influences from Mexican folk art to erotica and surf culture, his output included vibrant landscapes that have become the focus of the capsule collection – a selection of limited edition ready-to-wear, iconic bags and accessories.

Loewe x Ken Price silk LA scarf & Loewe x Ken Price LA print hoodie

Timeless Neutrals. Different shades of brown and beige… sometimes, you just have never enough of them.

Hed Mayner single-breasted blazer, Hed Mayner wool trousers, Ann Demeulemeester feather pendant necklace, Bottega Veneta tortoiseshell oval sunglasses, Lemaire croissant leather crossbody bag & Dries Van Noten pony hair derbies

Think Green, Wear Green. Green is often thought to represent tranquility, good luck and health. This is how we all want to enter 2021…

Acne Studios green hoodie, Loewe green ballet sneakers & “Expressionism. A Revolution in German Art” book by Taschen

Nerdy Non-Chalance. Tis the season of a geeky sweaters! Why not make the outfit even more so-bad-it’s-good with some statement accessories?

Gucci mohair cardigan, Acne Studios shopper, Raf Simons chelsea boots & Prada patterned jacquard knit jumper

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SSENSE GLOBAL

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The Great Outdoors. Whether its The Crown‘s British moores (obsessed) or stylish grocery shopping in your neighbourhood, gorgeous outerwear won’t dissapoint anyone.

Jacquemus “Les Mules” shoes, BODE workwear jacket, Bethany Williams patchwork-pattern polo jumper, Jil Sander checked logo-patch scarf, Bottega Veneta green rubber boots & Marine Serre denim jacket

Arty. Christo, the Bulgarian-born artist became internationally renowned for his monumental art projects that would redefine public spaces, landmarks and natural landscapes, often by augmenting or concealing their natural appearance with miles of fabric. He passed away this year, and to celebrate his ouvre, Taschen decided to update its monograph book on his and Jeanne-Claude’s artistic practice.

BODE embroidered trousers & “Christo and Jeanne-Claude. 40th Anniversary Edition” book by Taschen

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TASCHEN

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Los Angeles Cool. There are two labels coming from Los Angeles that I’m constantly obsessed with – Greg Chait’s The Elder Statesman and Eli Russell Linnetz’s ERL. While the first is a tie-dyed cashmere heaven, the second envisions a unisex world that reflects the heart and soul of LA’s youth. Both of them exude an air of nostalgia, with inspiration stemming from ‘90s films, Venice Beach skaters, and the Santa Monica aura. Oh, and both brands make genius clothes and accessories which will definitely work as a forever-lasting gifts!

ERL ski jacket, The Elder Statesman striped fringe cashmere scarf, ERL striped wool gloves, ERL socks & The Elder Statesman tie-dyed cashmere beanie

Parisian Chic. I wrote about Husbands Paris not a while ago. Everything is a dream, really, from their signature knitted ties to the most delightful trench coats. You’ll find Husbands between the orbits of tailoring and fashion, plucking the craftsmanship from the former and stories from the latter to fill an otherwise uninhabited space of the industry with culture and style. Want!

Husbands beige wool coat & Husbands silk knitted tie

Laid-Back.

Raf Simons “Smiley” print t-shirt, Maison Margiela wallet, Reebok by Pyer Moss socks, Lanvin belted jeans & Bottega Veneta sunglasses

Raf Knows What A Guy Needs. Really, if you’re not sure what he wants… buy him Raf Simons.

Raf Simons faux-fur coat & Raf Simons “Antei” suede low-top sneakers

More festive gift guides are coming soon! Here’s one you might have missed – for her!

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NET-A-PORTER Limited

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All collages by Edward Kanarecki.

Uniform. A.P.C. SS21

Many brands release their spring-summer 2021 collections right now, a month after the fashion month frenzy. For many, it’s the season of uncertainty. While the clothes will be produced, will anyone buy them? Will there be a reason to shop again? Will 2021 be saved by the vaccine or doomed by the total lockdown? This is a pack of questions that disturb everyone, from small labels to big players. And of course, the present times are also full of anxiety. On a video call with Vogue, Jean Touitou predicted that 2020 will “end up not as catastrophic as we thought at first” for brand A.P.C. Naturally, he had a theory as to why. “Is it because we do clothes,” he asked, “instead of just images of clothes?” Not waiting for an answer, he commented, “Reflection counts for more than substance” in this industry. These days, Touitou is coming around to the idea of content, “as long as it’s ‘very personal’ and ‘matter-of-fact.’” He said he’s considering a podcast series in which he and his three kids play a song and talk about its maker; episode one may feature “Arnold Layne,” a Syd Barrett tune off This Is Pink Floyd and the band’s very first single. “Playing music with our kids, nobody can do that but me,” Touitou reasoned. It’s thanks to Jean and Judith’s daughter Haydée that Tim Elkaim shot this season’s look book. She hired him for her magazine, The Skirt Chronicles, before he got this gig. “A virtuous circle,” Touitou called the familial give-and-take. What about the clothes? There’s lots to love, pretty much as usual with A.P.C. The oversized jeans with off-center button flies that first made an appearance last season returned here, and the same treatment was applied to a raw denim mini. All of the button-downs were buttoned up to the top and finished with a thick gold chain worn high under the collar. In one case, a chambray shirt was accessorized by three chains. Cool classics that have that Parisian soul – this just can’t go wrong.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Focus On: Husbands Paris

First of all, I’m not a suit guy. I usually hate ties and don’t feel comfortable in blazers. My personal style is rather this: a vintage cashmere knit, Lemaire-ish, over-sized pants (a big no to any sweatpants!), a big coat and Raf Simons sneakers. I yawn at all Zegnas and Brionis (although I respect them), as men’s tailoring is quite uninspiring to me. But there’s one exception. And it’s Husbands Paris. Whenever I see their posts on Instagram, I’m obsessed. Everything is a dream, really, from their signature knitted ties (they might be an ideal option that wouldn’t make me feel out of breath) to the most delightful trench coats. You’ll find Husbands between the orbits of tailoring and fashion, plucking the craftsmanship from the former and stories from the latter to fill an otherwise uninhabited space of the industry with culture and style. The mind behind it, Nicolas Gabard, is as clued up on the technicalities of suit making as he is on the depths of Francis Bacon’s art. This understanding of two worlds has allowed him to birth a bespoke identity of design. In an interview with GQ, he says “craftsmanship is the secret of styleHusbands comes from an obsession with the body – of precision and details. We keep the full canvas of tailoring and its construction because it guarantees a lasting garment. Technically, we offer a perfect piece, but its life comes when the wearer composes something with it.” That’s where the culture comes in. Gabard views fashion as an outlet for “phantasm” and, after stitching on the roots of tailoring through one eye, he seals his designs with stories through the other. They originate from expressive interests, like llistening to The Smiths and Joy Division or watching films by Eric Rohmer. Husbands is proposing the thread of forever intriguing style icons, like Serge Gainsbourg, and then using it as a hook to dig people into exploring the possibilities of their own identities. The label sources its materials from England and manufactures its suits in Naples, but Paris is the base that provides an essential interplay with the individual’s state of mind. As Gabard says, “you don’t have to live the life of other people and that’s the same for clothing – you have to wear your own garments with your body, your culture, your dreams, your past, your phantasm.

Discover the brand here or visit their store in Paris on 57 Rue de Richelieu (in post-lockdown times, of course…).

Collage by Edward Kanarecki, photos sourced from Husbands Paris site and Instagram.

Teenage Dreams. Raf Simons SS21

This season, we’ve had more of Raf Simons than usual – first in his new role at Prada back in September, and now in his name-sake label’s co-ed spring-summer 2021 collection. There are few working designers so vocally obsessed with youth culture as Simons. But the youth Simons seeks to explore isn’t exactly the youth of today – the young people advocating for climate justice, leading protests against police brutality and racism, and volunteering as poll workers. It’s his own youth that interests him. The metadata of his website, where he streamed his spring 2021 film “Teenage Dreams,” reads: “I don’t want to show clothes, I want to show my attitude, my past, present, and future. I use memories and future visions and try to place them in today’s world.” Designers are plumbing their own histories more than ever in this digital and isolated season, but this has always been Simons’s way. The press release for his teen dream collection lists the films that inspired him, many of which he has cited before, from Alien and Alice in Wonderland to Picnic at Hanging Rock and A Nightmare on Elm Street. That’s the totality of Simons’s statements on this collection, which features his first official foray into womenswear at this brand and his first fashion film since his start in the late ’90s, when similarly rakish models loafed about in Belgian photo studios and homes. Back then they smoked ciggys and drank champers and smushed into a single couch. In today’s film they populate in a nuclear floral set by Mark Colle: possessed, crawling on the floor, snatched into a web. As Simons’s youth in revolt slunk around in the film, punctuated by pulsing beats by Senjan Jansen, his signatures came into focus. The silhouette was as slim as ever and there was ample sloganeering and graphics, things his customers old and young adore, as well as photo prints of family members of Raf’s studio team. Raf stans will appreciate the continuity of his long lean silk skirts, colorful turtlenecks with R monograms at the throat, sleeveless tunics, and body-wrapping perspex tops. A big mustard knit, the sort of sweater Simons himself often wears, will be another fan favorite. It’s worn by both a male and female model, proving the point that while this is technically a womenswear debut, female shoppers have long found comfort in Simons’s work.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Colmar x White Mountaineering

The wait is over… White Mountaineering’s Yosuke Aizawa x Colmar A.G.E AW20 collection, as first glimpsed earlier in the year during Paris Fashion Week, is out. Founder and creative director of the Tokyo-based brand, Aizawa, known for his uncompromising rebellious yet elevated utilitarian menswear, has served up an eye- catching collaboration for the Italian Alpine brand Colmar A.G.E project. Colmar, known globally as the leading technical ski apparel and style pioneers sees its cutting- edge expertise and industrial fabric innovation prowess channeled into a 6-piece unisex collection. Finding common ground between Aizawa’s love of winter sports and Colmar’s almost 100 years of ski apparel expertise, the White Mountaineering x Colmar A.G.E AW20 collaboration serves up looks that feature a sense of two sides of the same coin. The result is a collection which reveals homogeny and full intersection between high performing, technically aligned fabrics and elevated streetwear.

Reimagined from the extensive Colmar archive this utilitarian collection does not wallow in the past instead it meets the needs of the modern style landscape with a nod to heritage. Consisting of a longer length parka plus a thigh length jacket, both water repellant and waterproof, with metal hardware vents, a patchwork of panel pockets, and an impressive warmth-to-weight ration. It’s only fitting that the spirit of invention that defines this collaboration sees both styles come in either padded filling or insulated with down so you choose the best weight outerwear that your lifestyle demands. Each style comes in either a muted black and grey hue combo or a bold biscuit colour with shots of pink and blue inserts. Buttons and zips are personalised with both labels’ emblems and the silicon logo of both brands runs discreetly along the storm flap, with the journey of the two houses joining forces found on a Tyvek label inside each piece. Additionally, the collection contains a brushed cotton pant, wool cotton mix sweatshirt and tee, as well as a boldly branded soft-shell under-jacket equipped with design features to suit a variety of conditions.This is a collection that is uncompromisingly functional in design and performance which collides harmoniously with utilitarian streetwear fashion making each piece an essential part of any wardrobe.