Camp Picasso. Moschino SS20

I still can’t believe that I’m writing about Jeremy Scott‘s Moschino. But his camp-y, silly, fun spring-summer 2020 collection just can’t be ignored. It was just as good as Franco Moscino’s Moschino. In a spectacle of art in motion, Scott’s line-up saw Pablo Picasso’s paintings reimagined as structured cocktail dresses. The designer drew on the iconography of the artist, transforming his best known motifs into theatrical, exaggerated garments – a dress adorned with a Cubist guitar, blouses with big shoulders that were flattened into two dimensions – that really, really amaze. Models emerged through a carved gilt frame, and even wore a wide, boxy dress version, its edges embroidered to three dimensions with gold thread and filled with a canvas of a Cubist nude that covered the model’s body. “Artists inspire the world” – this was Jeremy’s thought behind the collection. They really do.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Odd Sensuality. Bottega Veneta SS20

Daniel Lee‘s second collection at Bottega Veneta was the most anticipated moment of Milan fashion week. In fact, it’s the second collection that is the hardest: how to keep all the attention you had at the very beginning, excite everyone, and simultaneously be consistent? After his extremely promising debut and the global craze caused by the label’s pouches (they are a constant sold-outer on nearly each site) and so-fugly-it’s-good footwear, Daniel’s spring-summer 2020 was unexpectedly laid-back. Since all the Philophiles have turned into New Bottega fans, and they seem super assertive and passionate about it, it’s life-threatening to even say that I’m not really a fan of this collection. My first thought was that it’s the lazier version of autumn-winter 2019 line-up: same beaded dresses but in new colours, super over-sized coats, knitted dresses with sharp, at a first glance odd in positioning skin-baring details (as in case of men’s sweaters), leather bermuda shorts. The newest addition – the monkey printed silks – felt completely random. I might even say that I liked menswear more than womenswear: those blazers are to die for, not speaking of the black trench coat on James Turtlington (yes, this Turtlington). Bottega Veneta’s accessories thrive in being hot. Exaggerated weavings on the sandals are new take on the house’s intreciatto; the pouch clutch came in leather crotchet; the shoulder bags are bigger than ever. Still, the ready-to-wear missed the mark for me, as for the first impression. Maybe I’m saying that right now and I will change my mind when I see the clothes in stores.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Craft. Jil Sander SS20

Lucie and Luke Meier have already proven throughout their time at Jil Sander that its more than a white shirt and a pair of black pants to them. Their vision of the brand is all about soft, tender, warm minimalism with a bit of edginess. For springs-summer 2020, the couple decided to experiment with craftsmanship, which had its ups and downs in the collection. The over-sized tailoring, pleated dresses and boxy shirt printed with an abstract landscape were the most convincing to me, while being the least risky in the line-up. Long silk tunics embroidered with sequins in the shapes of birds over narrow trousers was my another favourite. However, the natural raffia detailing that dominated the last looks felt unneeded, even forced, and it obscured the gorgeous, flowing silhouettes the Meiers are so good at.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

The Love for Details. Zanini SS20

Marco Zanini‘s name-sake label – Zanini – is the antidote for seeing too many big brands with their four or more collections a year that, simply speaking, lack any substance. Zanini is a quiet mega-talent, whose aesthetic and precision in making clothes isn’t based on random references and muses. His clothes are of the best possible quality, they are luxurious, but in a peaceful, logo-less way – they are investment pieces. His debut, autumn-winter 2019 collection, was a promise of great things to come. And here we are in the spring-summer 2020 season, and Marco impresses even more. All of the materials were uniquely developed for him, from the “crispy” checked cotton of a smock dress to the super-deluxe washed ivory satin of a tank dress, double-layered for ease of wear and comfort. Zanini pays attention to the smallest detail: the way a coat sleeve gathers at the elbow; the tie at the back of a mannish jacket that creates a womanly hourglass shape. The designer’s point of view has been at least partially formed by his roots – he’s Swedish on his mother’s side. “Scandinavia is in love with little details that you could call nothingness,” as he puts it. “But they are everything to me.” Love.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.