The Choice: Saint Laurent AW17

A few days ago I asked you on my Instagram stories to pick one of your favourite collections ever and I would make a collage with it. Here’s @elif.karadut’s choice: Anthony Vaccarello‘s autumn-winter 2017 collection for Saint Laurent! All dressed up, but nowhere to go… for now.

More of your choices are coming in the following days! If you missed the game, you can still write me your favourite collection and I will do the work. Got plenty of time. Culture isn’t cancelled, fashion isn’t cancelled!

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Belle Époque Today. Louis Vuitton SS20

And here is the last collection of Paris Fashion Week: Louis Vuitton. It’s been a season of joyful nostalgia and bold dressing, and Nicolas Ghesquière ticked both boxes with his line-up. For spring-summer 2020 Ghesquière took us to Belle Époque–era Paris after his last season‘s venture to the 1980s. “It’s a part of French history that’s very interesting in art, as well as culturally, in terms of emancipation of women, and, of course, in literature with Proust,” he explained. It’s also a period that more or less coincided with the birth and rise of the house of Louis Vuitton. In the late 1800s, advances in construction and technology ushered in a new era of travel for the elite, to whom Monsieur Vuitton sold his  monogram trunks. There were many Belle Époque references in this collection: the pouf sleeves of shirts; the iris boutonnières, each one different; the Gibson Girl hairdos, and all the Art Nouveau touches, from the psychedelic swirls of a green jacquard coat to the painterly flowers on dresses to a little leather jacket hand-painted with angelic faces. In a way I miss the times when Nicolas did future-wear: we’ve got Gucci, Paco Rabanne and a bunch of other labels that dig in the past for references. Still, the huge screen that featured super-futurist Scottish musician SOPHIE performing an extended version of “It’s Okay to Cry”  while the models walked the runway somehow matched with the clothes’ historical background. And this sort of time-spanning eclecticism is very Ghesquière.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Party Girl. Saint Laurent Pre-Fall 2018

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She’s a party girl – that’s quite clear once you look at Anthony Vaccarello‘s pre-fall 2018 look-book for Saint Laurent, and the attitude of the woman he envisions. That transitional wardrobe is meant to be classically YSL, but suited for contemporary times. We’ve got bohemian blouses, velvet Le Smoking blazers, leopard spots all over platform boots, studded leather miniskirts, gold lamé minidress – the list goes on. With the ‘Mick Jagger in Morocco’ look, wearing non-chalantly tied shawls and embroidered vests, Mica Arganaraz and Jamie Bochert are like a match-made-in-heaven for this look-book.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

The MET was Heaven.

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Maria Carla Boscono by Juergen Teller.

I very rarely write about such mainstream events as the MET Gala, but this year was awkwardly… good. A heaven’s gift, even. Noting this year’s Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination theme, the guests had to give a thought to their appearance. Actually, it could have gone all wrong. But, surprisingly, some of the looks will become somewhat iconic! And that’s something to cherish. It’s truly pleasing to know that there are actors, musicians and celebrities that want to break the norms and dare to stand out on the red carpet – especially at MET, where boredom should leave right away.

I know I might look really late with this fellow ranking of the best looks, comparing to all the others in the industry (well, my final exams are in progress, so please do excuse me!). But still, posting this feels like a right thing to do.

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How I love Frances McDormand in this Valentino haute couture ensemble. She looks so non-chalant, yet chilled out. And she smoked a cigarette, while wearing that magnificent headwear. Thanks God for Pierpaolo Piccioli, who really nailed it with that collection, and thanks God for Frances, a woman to adore and admire.

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Well, Rihanna in John Galliano‘s major Maison Margiela pope fashion. No explanation needed I guess.

 

Anthony Vaccarello‘s Saint Laurent gang of dark angels that featured Zoë Kravitz, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Anja Rubik, Kate Moss, Mica Arganaraz and Charlotte Casiraghi. Hell yes.

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Solange in Iris Van Herpen is somewhere between an alien dominatrix and a Goddess. Can be two at a time, why not.

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Possibly, Greta Gerwig wanted to look elegantly invisible. Well, that dramatic The Row dress was the MET Gala’s most serene fashion moment, but in the best possible way. A nun goes to the ball! Love.

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Susie Cave‘s velvet Gucci gown is pure romance, as if taken straight from a romantic era ballad.

I’m picky, I know. But those were my ultimate favourites. Amen.

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Legs Only. Saint Laurent AW18

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What was expected to be Paris fashion week’s hottest ticket (especially, noting the last season’s fashion galore under the Eiffel Tower) resulted in a… very boring collection. I actually thought that Anthony Vaccarello is the right man for Saint Laurent, until I saw that tedious line-up of extremely short shorts, velvet blazers and all-black (or floral) mini-dresses. Was it a Hedi Slimane ‘appreciation’ collection? Well, that kind of style still sells best and resonates most easily with the current client. It really feels as if the important guys behind Saint Laurent cut the budget this season, as well. Other than the models’ long, long legs, Vaccarello’s autumn-winter 2018 collection has nothing much to talk about.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.