Eat (and Wear) Cake. Moschino AW20

I suddenly started enjoying Jeremy Scott’s Moschino last season, when he showed the super camp intepretation of fashion-meets-art. His work lately is absolutely un-commercial, and that might be reason looking at it is so amusing. For autumn-winter 2020, he chose a total fashion cliché: Marie Antoinette. Karl Lagerfeld did a Chanel collection dedicated to her. Last season, Thom Browne had his models wear painful-looking crinolines, corsets and big hair fit for the Versailles. In Milan, Scott clashed Marie Antoinette pannier dresses with the most emblematic womenswear garment of the radical 1960s, the miniskirt. Scott’s mini pannier came in various iterations: gold brocade on denim, white biker, black biker, and toile de Jouy. This archetypally 18th-century pattern was used across the collection with the original faces of its cavorting courtiers transformed into wide-eyed anime characters. The kitschy, cake-based finale that was served was hilarious and provided total visual oversaturation with all its sweetness and icing-like details. Let them eat (and wear) cake.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Camp Picasso. Moschino SS20

I still can’t believe that I’m writing about Jeremy Scott‘s Moschino. But his camp-y, silly, fun spring-summer 2020 collection just can’t be ignored. It was just as good as Franco Moscino’s Moschino. In a spectacle of art in motion, Scott’s line-up saw Pablo Picasso’s paintings reimagined as structured cocktail dresses. The designer drew on the iconography of the artist, transforming his best known motifs into theatrical, exaggerated garments – a dress adorned with a Cubist guitar, blouses with big shoulders that were flattened into two dimensions – that really, really amaze. Models emerged through a carved gilt frame, and even wore a wide, boxy dress version, its edges embroidered to three dimensions with gold thread and filled with a canvas of a Cubist nude that covered the model’s body. “Artists inspire the world” – this was Jeremy’s thought behind the collection. They really do.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.