Time Travel. Louis Vuitton Resort 2020

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Nicolas Ghesqière seems to be not over his love for the past decades. Louis Vuitton‘s resort 2020, which was presented at the historic TWA Flight Center in New York (the fantastic space, renovated for years and soon to be open as a hotel, was designed by Eero Saarinenback  in 1962), was all about the past: 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s, combined with Elizabethan NYC’s art deco heritage. Which again reminds us that fashion, unfortunately, has problems with finding inspiration anywhere else. But back to the collection. Stewardess dresses and Chrysler-Building-inspired bags; 1980’s big sleeves and combat boots of the 1990s; Catwoman skullcaps and pantsuits of Wall Street. Highlight? Marte Mei van Haaster’s strass-lined caped crop-top. But in general, not a fan of this collection.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

80s. Louis Vuitton AW19

Nicolas Ghesquière‘s autumn-winter 2019 collection for Louis Vuitton was an ode to self-expression, but also, a clear nod to the 1980s. You loved it or hated it. With a faux Centre Pompidou facade built inside of Louvre’s Cour Carrée (yes, one mega-museum of Paris in another), the whole scene was time transporting. Eccentric and eclectic, the jackets had big shoulders, skirts were over-the-knee and prints made you think of the Memphis Group. The leather skullcaps and colourful riding boots are here for a go-kart race. The most convincing looks were the ones near the finale: high-waisted pants, over-sized blazers and leather ties (they made think of Hedi Slimane’s last season debut at Celine, though…). Can’t say this collection is a favourite of mine, but it was a closing statement of Paris fashion week: the past is today’s fashion favourite sandpit to play in.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Future is Now. Louis Vuitton SS19

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While Nicolas Ghesquière‘s autumn-winter 2018 collection for Louis Vuitton was a bourgeois wardrobe fantasy, this season the designer returns to his all-time favourite themes: sci-fi, 80s call-backs and the clash between the old and the new. Innovative, rubber-like materials were used in architectural coats (that instantly recalled Nicolas’ brilliance at Balenciaga). The way the designer combined over-sized, space suit sleeves with meticulously embellished mini-dresses was so, so good. Need a fashion space-suit? Ghesquière has you covered with a floral ensemble. But there were also more approachable, easy clothes. Take the perfectly tailored blazers and boldly printed tank-tops. Oh, and the models! The casting stunned with beautiful diversity, from gorgeous new-comers and androgynous girls to runway veterans and transgender males. For Nicolas, the future is now.

Also, it’s the end of my Paris fashion week coverage. And a very happy good-bye to the fashion month.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Art and Riviera. Louis Vuitton Resort 2019

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I know, I know. It seems that Louis Vuitton‘s resort 2019 collection took place ages ago. But I’ve been holidaying for a while in the Algarve region of Portugal, and hey – shouldn’t we all slow down the pace in the industry? Shall we make make reflection, not the instantness, a priority?

Nicolas Ghesquiere‘s take on French Riviera’s artistic aura was brilliantly executed at the Fondation Maeght in St. Paul-de-Vence. The runway, filled with Giacometti sculptures, was a perfect backdrop for the season’s flowing dresses, evening tops with feathers and deconstructed vests. The collection is full of contrasts. Leather over-the-knee sneaker-boots clashed with feminine flou of some of the outing’s most refined looks, while 80s volumes and prints were put next to boudoir-esque pink satin and lace. Shortly, Nicolas celebrates diversity in dressing, that used to be rich among the artists who settled across the Riviera.

What is it today to be an original, [someone] who has her own way of dressing? This bricolage . . . you can start a real movement. I love those people who are eccentric.” Possibly, Ghesquiere had Grace Coddington on his mind, who collaborated on the Vuitton bags the season. The mega-stylist and former creative director of Vogue worked on a collection of bags based on the sketches she does of her beloved cats and Nicolas’ dog. Maybe it’s the sea breeze that’s doing the work, but that was one of the best collections coming from the designer in a while.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.