The 2010s / Hedi Slimane’s Saint Laurent

Believe it or not – I can’t! – but we’re heading towards a new millenium. So, how do you choose the most important collections, designers and labels of the decade? The ones that made an actual impact in the 2010s? Well, it’s not an easy task. It all began in September 2009 with New York’s spring-summer 2010 shows and ended when the autumn-winter 2019 haute couture shows wrapped in Paris. Few thousands of shows, by the way. There will be 19 posts (that’s really the only possible minimum!) reminding about the best – and if not the best, then strongly influencing – moments in fashion.

Hedi Slimane‘s Saint Laurent.

Hate it or love it, but Hedi Slimane’s time at Saint Laurent was one of the most influential moments in fashion this decade. The designer not only completely rebranded the brand (from the name – no more Yves – to the worldwide store appearances), introduced new “brand ambassadors” (Courtney Love, Beck, Kim Gordon, Joni Mitchell AND Marilyn Manson, all photographed by the designer for ad campaigns) and infamously called out the critics just for being honest (the Cathy Horyn beef!), but also polarised the fashion industry into two camps: Hedi fanatics, who go crazy for his Celine today, and Hedi sceptics. The designer implemented a youthful, rock & roll and very L.A. mood to the label, sending down baby-doll dresses, vintage-looking floral frocks, super-mini skirts and heavy boots with the attitude of the most rebellious girl in town. One of the most memorable collections he “designed” for the house? Definitely the autumn-winter 2013 show. It was inspired with the lifestyle of Venice Beach, California, and nodded to Yves’ The Scandal Collection from 1971, which was called “notorious” and “disgusting” by its guests (but in the end became iconic). As Tim Blanks pointed out about this Slimane collection, “almost nothing looked new”. Sloppy cardigans, plaid shirts and sparkly dresses accessorized with strings of pearls and black bows. While grunge was long dead, Slimane brought it back to life, and what’s the most ironic – the entire collection was sold out, even though the price tags were far, far from the thrift store originals. Of course Marc Jacobs’ final Perry Ellis collection was first, but Slimane appeared to be in the right place and right time with this line-up. I’m still on fence with Slimane’s era at YSL, but one thing’s sure: it was much more disruptive (and naughty) than Anthony Vaccarello’s work today for tha maison.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

The Statements Pieces. Balenciaga Resort 2020

Balenciaga released its resort 2020 look-book just in time when the clothes start to hit the stores. Demna Gvasalia‘s pre-collections for the maison aren’t as spectacular as the main shows (the spring-summer 2020 collection we’ve seen last month was one of his best to date!), but they sum up the label’s statement pieces: Balenciaga wardrobe “basics” (like tailoring with Cristobal Balenciaga’s couture volumes), the best-selling apparel and key bags. What else? Outsize parkas with their cheekbone-grazing collars, easy-wearing printed tea dresses in souvenir prints, XXL pajama sets… all this in the least matching colours you can imagine. But somehow, everything works together more than well. The look-book-opening coat is stamped with the Balenciaga logo in the familiar block print, but even without it one can identify the sloping shoulders, buttoned collar, and boxy, exaggerated fit as signature Gvasalia. And what’s my personal favourite from the line-up? The leather blouson-jacket in bold green, as pictured above.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

The 2010s / Galliano’s Future at Maison Margiela

Maison Margiela AW18 Couture by John Galliano

Believe it or not – I can’t! – but we’re heading towards a new millenium. So, how do you choose the most important collections, designers and labels of the decade? The ones that made an actual impact in the 2010s? Well, it’s not an easy task. It all began in September 2009 with New York’s spring-summer 2010 shows and ended when the autumn-winter 2019 haute couture shows wrapped in Paris. Few thousands of shows, by the way. There will be 19 posts (that’s really the only possible minimum!) reminding about the best – and if not the best, then strongly influencing – moments in fashion.

John Galliano‘s vision of the future at Maison Margiela.

Maybe I wasn’t a total fan of every Maison Margiela collection under John Galliano, but one thing is sure: the designer’s vision for the brand is always thought-provoking. Moreover, just a couple of days ago, it was announched that after five years as creative director of the label, John has extended his contract. Galliano joined Maison Margiela in 2014, taking over the brand’s womenswear, menswear, accessories and Artisanal couture collection. Under his tenure, the revenues have even doubled (which is positively surprising!). John’s talent is matched by his understanding of today’s generations: its ways of thinking, struggles and dreams. And he is doing exactly what the label always did at its best: disrupt, innovate, and inspire. One of my favourite collections is the autumn-winter 2018 couture line-up. Collections like this make you believe in fashion again. Maison Margiela‘s Artisanal line is an outlet for Galliano‘s wildest ideas, which seems to let him explore his most dynamic ideas with the unlimited freedom. But when you listened to John speaking about the collection, you suddenly undertood it’s not just a mega-artist’s next epic fantasy. There’s a seed of reality in those multi-layered garments packed with utilitarian textiles, protective pillow-y elements and extreme colours. “We’re all nomads today. . . we do move in tribes.” That nomadic glamour, the term he coined after the show, refers to the contemporary state of things. On the daily basis, we absorb so much information through different, constantly booming media. At the end of the day, we want comfort – but is it even possible in today’s world? Rather, we need shelter or an armour – which can be constructed from tulle, felt wool or some sponge-y material, just as Galliano predicts. Even though we already exist in the hi-tech world, the vision of iPhones and iPads sticking out of our bodies like some kind of exoskeleton feels rather dystopian on the other note. But then, if the future will bring the humanity to “neo-digital natives”, as the designer called it, then at least our wardrobes won’t disappoint with boldness.

All collages by Edward Kanarecki.

The 2010s / Lemaire AW15

Believe it or not – I can’t! – but we’re heading towards a new millenium. So, how do you choose the most important collections, designers and labels of the decade? The ones that made an actual impact in the 2010s? Well, it’s not an easy task. It all began in September 2009 with New York’s spring-summer 2010 shows and ended when the autumn-winter 2019 haute couture shows wrapped in Paris. Few thousands of shows, by the way. There will be 19 posts (that’s really the only possible minimum!) reminding about the best – and if not the best, then strongly influencing – moments in fashion.

Lemaire AW15 and sensual minimalism.

If you’re visiting my journal, even from time to time, you surely know how I love Lemaire. Christophe Lemaire and Sarah Linh Tran‘s Paris-based label is one of my ultimate favourites, every season. But in the 2010s period, it was their autumn-winter 2015 collection that completely, completely stole my heart. It was the perfect balance between minimalism and sensuality. So elegance, chic, yet wearable. And elusively appealing! The heat was undoubtedly turned up: more bare shoulders, more daring décolleté, plus a molded leather bag that Tran described as “boobs and ass.” Asked to describe  how the Lemaire woman has moved on, Lemaire answered: “More dangerous, less melancholic.” Sexuality that’s subtle; in between the lines; unobvious. But, as I said, any other Lemaire collection that we’ve seen this decade is nearly as good. Another favourites include autumn-winter 2019, spring-summer 2017 and autumn-winter 2013. And of course autumn-winter 2017, the collection I saw in person in Paris during a showroom presentation!

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.