Best Looks from AW19 Couture…


The library lounge venue at Chanel and models walking to Portishead’s forever intriguing ‘Glory Box’…

While in overall the autumn-winter 2019 haute couture had more mehs (Daniel Roseberry’s overcharged debut at Schiaparelli, the chaos at Maria Grazia Chiuri’s Dior…) than yeahs, I still managed to find a few looks that really, really won it. And, of course Pierpaolo Piccioli’s Valentino utterly stole my heart, but on that in a separate post. So, here are the three most gorgeous outfits I took notice of this season (again, except for Valentinoooo!).

This Viktor & Rolf look is like a Marc Chagall painting, in all of its aspects: from the paint-like texture of the felt material to the witchy, oneiric aura surrounding it. I call this art-and-coven couture.

Virginie Viard‘s debut couture collection at Chanel first felt like a snooze to me. But then I grasped its point: the beauty in regal. It’s just so rare in today’s fashion. The look worn by Sara Grace Wallerstedt – a pleated, high-collar, sleeveless shirt and a mustard skirt – is pure elegance.

With Clare Waight Keller, one season is a miss, another is a success. The autumn-winter 2019 couture outing was her best one yet. She has let some drama to Givenchy. The velvet, black dress with a lowered crinoline is so refined and sharp. So chic, yet in a way… disturbing? That’s the spirit of noblesse radicale.

All collages by Edward Kanarecki.

Spiritual. GmbH SS20

As Benjamin Huseby and Serhat Isik of the Berlin-based brand GmbH explained, “we have always talked about protection, but this time we wanted to make a gentler collection and focus on spiritual, or intellectual, protection.” Huseby and Isik looked to their cultural heritage (which is fusion of Pakistani, Norwegian, Turkish and German) and focused especially on the Nazar, also known as Evil Eye. Wearing an evil eye is a form of superstitious protection from misfortune at the hands of fate, and GmbH’s models were heartily armored in beautiful brocade evil eye shirts, flowing many-eyed silk shirts and trousers, T-shirts, and gorgeous dresses in intense blue and pink. Good energy is always welcome. The designers as well impressed with their clever tailoring that was just the right balance between formal and sporty. GmbH gets better and better with every season.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s – Dream State. Loewe SS20

Jonathan Anderson continues his escapist formula at Loewe and it keeps on surprising. Spring-summer 2020 collection for men was like a picture of spiritual escape into what he called “a childlike dream state”. The outing felt like a peaceful march of modern day hippies, wearing the intentionally unmatching accessories, flowing, gender-fluid kaftan-dresses and fleecy, feather-light knits. Eclecticism and handmade crafts are one of the most important qualities Anderson nurtures at Loewe, and with his collage-y sensibility for styling, he makes it sophisticated, yet desirable at the same time. You want to dress in this spirit, all year round. “We have to be aware of what’s going on in the world, but sometimes it’s good to dream. Why should people not be in a fantasy state? Maybe they’ll find something.” Words to live by.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s – Classics. Lemaire SS20

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When so much is going on in menswear (especially this season), there might be a need for something classic. In this case, you can’t go wrong with Lemaire. Christophe Lemaire and Sarah Linh Tran‘s spring-summer 2020 look-book is the perfect balance of softened workwear and tailored essentials, all kept in a colour palette of powdery, earthy tones. Shirting and loose tops came in prints produced in collaboration with a marbling designer, originally a specialist on bookmaking. The collection subtly nodded to Rüdiger Vogler in 1974’s Wim Wenders film Alice in the Cities, but even not knowing that, you’re completely convinced by this line-up. That’s the power of Lemaire – references are low-key, uninvasive, and you’re focused on the clothes.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.