Prague’s Addresses II

In addition to my Prague addresses I discovered back in autumn (read about them here), here are three more places I found worth visiting in the Czech capital.

What makes Prague locals and well-informed tourists go to the rather sleepy Karlin district? One word: Eska. It’s a restaurant with a bakery which brings together the traditional and the modern – on the plate, and in its arty/industrial interior spread across two floors. It’s a spot from Ambiente (Prague’s leading culinary collective) that brings you food made of Czech ingredients with the daring touch of the head chef Martin Štangl. Here, you will enjoy breakfast, a lunch or an intimate evening meal made of several courses. When you leave, don’t miss the fire-baked bread, organic dairy, selected meats from Naše Maso and a take-away coffee at the Eska store.

Pernerova 49

Your culture time should be spent at the Veletržní Palác. At the time of its construction (completed in 1928), this was the largest building of its kind in the world and the first ‘Functionalist’ building in Prague. Today it serves the needs of the National Gallery. A unique collection of Czech and international contemporary art, it includes some well-known examples of French and European art, including major works by such names as Picasso, Toyen, Renoir, van Gogh, Klimt, Gauguin, Cezanne, Rodin and many more. Take your time to see all the four floors and the temporary exhibitions.

Kantýna is another address coming from under Ambiente’s wing. The concept is quite surprising – it’s a literal canteen, but aesthetically pleasing. With a butcher store in the front and a restaurant space in the back, this place is for true meat lovers (or even, maniacs). I wasn’t really impressed with the sausage I ordered, and I’m not a beer-loving type of person, but I guess there are people who enjoy this sort of culinary ‘adventure’. I came here for the interior!

Photographs by Edward Kanarecki.

Christmas in Prague

This Christmas, I went to Prague with my family, and it couldn’t be lovelier. Of course, there was some stress regarding the typical ‘Christmas conventions’ of staying at home and all… but then, Prague feels so, so at home. Those cobblestone streets, all the truly festive decorations, the panoramic views at the river (always filled with swans, whatever season it is!). And, to my own surprise, so many places are open throughout the holidays. New addresses, that will well add up to the spots I’ve written about back in October, are about to be posted here, hopefully before the New Year. For now, here are some moments from those few days.

Prague’s monumental, spikey architecture, some new season Prada at the Parizska street, and the delightful Christmas tree adorning the main square.

‘Grace: The Thirty Years of Fashion at Vogue’, signed by the one-and-only Grace Coddington, is what I got from Santa. I guess I was good this year… 

The iconic Czech Krtek, re-imagined in every possible way; the tram near Prague’s National Theatre; Art Deco-ish reliefs and ornaments near Jozefovo district; the crazy, colourful Czech glassware.

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Kin Dee

Looking for a fresh, fine dining experience in Berlin? Kin Dee is the answer, then. Dalad Kambhu‘s bright culinary retreat, full of robust flavours and bold Thai aromas, is here to elevate the city’s view on Asian cusine. Born and raised in Bangkok, Kambhu, who is a self-trained cook, lived in New York for a decade before deciding to move to Berlin to open her first restaurant with artist Rirkrit Tiravanija. Tiravanjia – whose artwork often involves the context of shared meals – helped pioneer a sharing set menu at Kin Dee. From Duo Pla (ceviche fjord trout and scalops with Thai herb dressing) and Kaprao Octopus (octopus confit in a very, very spicy sauce) to Sweet Green Beef Curry and the special of the day, everything appears to be a taste rhapsody, coming straight from Dalad’s kitchen. Better book a table in advance!

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Zazi Vintage in Berlin

Finally managed to visit Zazi Vintage in its Mitte showroom in Berlin (Max-Beer-Straße 31)! In case you’ve missed the post I’ve written a while ago on this incredible initiative, here’s your Monday read!

So, you will thank me later for telling you about Zazi Vintage. Although Jeanne Zizi Margot de Kroon‘s label is based in Berlin, the Dutch entrepreneur has a global vision to share. She quitted modelling industry after her great disillusion with the fashion world’s unethical approach towards sweat-shop production and decided to oppose chain stores’ and big companies’ continous exploitation of female workers. With the founder’s focus on sustainability and women empowerment, Zazi Vintage respects and embraces traditional clothe-making, using rejected fabrics and old materials. The brand’s seasonless pieces are made by local women from distant places, like Tajikistan or Afghanistan. From the most intricately embroidered Suzani coats from Tajikistan to Ikat woven dresses made by Saheli women, these pieces aren’t just precious and one-of-a-kind additions to a wardrobe. Zazi Vintage, with support of Institute for Philanthropy and Humanitarian Development, helps girls fund education and continue their incredible work.

Learn more about Zazi Vintage on their site – click here. By the way, those coats with shearling lining are here to keep you warm the entire winter season.

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.