Folklore, Revamped. Magda Butrym AW19

Magda Butrym no longer needs an introduction in the industry. At her core, the Polish designer stands for two things: local hand craftsmanship and fashion that’s playful, yet sophisticated. Her autumn-winter 2019 offers plenty of her signature floral mini dresses in updated silhouettes and statement, 80’s tailoring. But there are also new additions: one of the blazers has a huge black flower attached to it, making the look fantastically exagerrated, but not ridiculous. The handwoven oatmeal sweater is another highlight – it’s backless and comes with waist-cinching ties. As Butrym told Vogue, she’s “inspired by the romantic East”. Well, just look at the pleated silk frock covered in a folk-inspired poppy print and you will get it right away. Each Magda Butrym design is created in an old Warsaw home, where Butrym and her brother have carved out their family business in the old Polish style. She’s a leading Polish designer with countless retailers world-wide, but at the same time she stays where her home is, and consistently fuses her local surroundings with current obsessions, like cowboys or Dolly Parton, in her work.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki, photos Bibi Cornejo Borthwick.

Three Places in Warsaw

Three places you’ve got to visit when in Warsaw

Mood Scent Bar

It’s not your average store with perfumes. Here, you will discover the world’s most niche fragrances, from the pret-a-porter to haute couture ones. Whether its D.S. & Durga’s Amber Kiso or Orto Parisi’s Boccanera or Stora Skuggan’s Moonmilk, each fragrance sold at Mood Scent Bar tells a unique story. Other than perfumes, you will find here Astier de Villatte’s stationery and Mariage Frères’ delightful teas.

ul. Bracka 3 (they have two more spots).

Capricorn Arthouse

Possibly the most magical place in Warsaw. The owners really sell what they love, from Jamin Puech’s artisan bags to Justyna Górecka’s beautiful, hand-made plates. Today, it’s a growing rarity to find a store that has such a sense of curation. Big love. The store is currently having it’s pop-up at Concept 21 in Poznań!

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Image House

Luxury vintage is rather a dead topic in Poland. It’s often a random splatter of Zanottis, Pleins, occasional fakes and God knows what else. Well, until I’ve discovered Alicja Napiórkowska’s Image House, which is the ultimate exception. Good, old Céline, Rick Owens, Yves Saint Laurent, Comme Des Garçons… brilliant.

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All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Polish Sea

Here’s a little throwback to our trip to the Baltic Sea back from May… fresh, breezy air, daffodils, forest walks, crayfish for lunch, more forest walks. I really feel like I need this sort of detox again!

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Polish Jazz. MISBHV SS19

misbhvFor a moment, let’s switch from resort look-books and New York’s off-the-schedule runways to Warsaw’s socrealist icon – Palace of Culture. Few days ago, Natalia Maczek and Tomek Wirski did their spring-summer 2019 runway show for the first time in Warsaw. MISBHV stands for so many things: to some, it’s a go-to streetwear label favoured by the big names (Kylie and all). For others, it’s an internationally recognized label that sells in stores among Vetements and Raf Simons. And the other others (like my friends, for instance) know it for great hoodies with intriguing prints.

This season, however, Maczek and Wirski wanted to explore new fields and do something different than usual. Having deep interests in the Polish 50s and 60s, the designers immersed themselves in a theme that doesn’t come up to you instantly when thinking of the brand. Jazz, or rather “Polish Jazz” (as the collection’s name suggests), became the season’s key-point. Moreover, MISBHV invited Rosław Szaybo, the legendary Polish graphic designer (who did album covers for Miles Davis, Janis Joplin and, of course, the cult “Polish Jazz” series) to collaborate on the prints. Blurring the lines between womenswear and menswear, the label’s latest offering includes flowing dresses, over-sized blazers, bike shorts, PVC coats and headscarves (a beautiful nod to Slavic culture!). But there are MISBHV classics as well, like the WARSZAWA print or friendly-to-the-public t-shirts. Polish fashion keeps on evolving, slowly, but it does. And seeing brands like MISBHV having such progress, and executing their visions so well, makes me really proud.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki featuring Wojciech Plewiński’s photograph of Warsaw; Rosław Szaybo’s album covers.

SSENSE