Slavic Romance. Magda Butrym SS20

For spring-summer 2020, Magda Butrym does her thing in the best possible way. The Polish designer looks at the East through her own, idiosyncratic perspective, creating the modern-day “Slavic romance” – even suited for a client who not necessarily has much to do with the region. Her signature, sharp-shouldered silhouettes beautifully define her mini dresses and vintage-y tailoring (just take a look at the masculine, silk coat in polished white to see the sharpness I’m talking about). Florals take center stage, either as reworked folk prints or an incredible 3-D sculptural bodice that stands away from the body to resemble a rose in full bloom. The pleated, long-sleeved dress in bold pink is equally appealing. Butrym’s love for folk is never too literal in her work, but the previously mentioned Slavic romance she manages to incorporate in her fashion is always charming and heart-warming (especially for Poles like me who really wish Polish labels embraced its local heritage – without falling into folklore clichées, of course).

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Folklore, Revamped. Magda Butrym AW19

Magda Butrym no longer needs an introduction in the industry. At her core, the Polish designer stands for two things: local hand craftsmanship and fashion that’s playful, yet sophisticated. Her autumn-winter 2019 offers plenty of her signature floral mini dresses in updated silhouettes and statement, 80’s tailoring. But there are also new additions: one of the blazers has a huge black flower attached to it, making the look fantastically exagerrated, but not ridiculous. The handwoven oatmeal sweater is another highlight – it’s backless and comes with waist-cinching ties. As Butrym told Vogue, she’s “inspired by the romantic East”. Well, just look at the pleated silk frock covered in a folk-inspired poppy print and you will get it right away. Each Magda Butrym design is created in an old Warsaw home, where Butrym and her brother have carved out their family business in the old Polish style. She’s a leading Polish designer with countless retailers world-wide, but at the same time she stays where her home is, and consistently fuses her local surroundings with current obsessions, like cowboys or Dolly Parton, in her work.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki, photos Bibi Cornejo Borthwick.

Małgosia Bochenek

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She’s mystical, she’s nature, she’s primavera. Inspired by woman and womanhood, Małgosia Bochenek embraces those who live in harmony with the rhythm of nature and it’s cycle. Delicate fabrics, feminine frills, transparencies and flowery patterns – yes, designs for real goddesses. That’s the vision of a woman according to Małgosia, whose new, namesake label has just kicked off (specifically, on the first day of spring). And I’m more than happy to present you the campaign I’ve been working on with her and Paulina Pajka, the photographer. Hope you will enjoy those witchy, sun-drenched and Goddard-inspired collages.

See her site as well!

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Collages by Edward Kanarecki.

Natalia Siebuła

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Polish fashion used to be something of an underrated, rather oblivious niche. Today, however, we’ve got such incredible labels like Natalia Siebuła that steal the hearts of local customers. The visuals from her spring-summer 2018 look-book (by Piotr Czyż) make you drool over everything: from the pleated polka-dots skirt with pastel-pink inserts to the cotton shirts printed with Małgorzata Jagielska’s illustrations. The collection was photographed in an UFO-resembling train station in Kielce. Opened in 1984, it was seen as one of the most modern bus stations of its kind in Poland. Although today it’s no longer as appreciated as it used to be, the place works as a delightfully contrasting background for Siebuła’s feminine, yet not overly saccharine clothing.

Le Nuvole. Ania Kuczyńska AW17

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Ania Kuczyńska‘s autumn-winter 2017 collection, elusively titled Le Nuvole (meaning ‘clouds’ in Italian), is a minimalist heaven at the first glace. But is it just plain minimalism? The Warsaw-based designer is known for encoding various references and  personal obsessions in her sharply cut, yet tactile garments. This season, it was a nod to her beloved Italy. Don’t associate that tip too superficially, though, as there is nothing like cliché in Kuczyńska’s creativity. Morning black coffee served in Palermo; a glass of Sicilian wine (well relates to the burgundy colour of the must-have ballet slippers); the shade of navy that resembles the Italian, night sky. Then, there’s also Monica Vitti’s ethereal grace in those silk dresses and feminine blouses. The 3/4 skirts ooze with a Luca Guadagnino film sensuality – yes, think of Tilda Swinton’s character in A Bigger Splash. The expressive silhouette of Ania’s new season pieces reflect the motion of Tarantella  – folk dance in the Southern part of Italy, characterized by a fast upbeat tempo. Although that seems like quite a lot for one collection, Kuczyńska pulls it off like no other, keeping it true to her style. The mood, the texture, the silhouette – Le Nuvole is what you call eccelente, in every aspect.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki, feauturing Wojciech Plewiński’s shot from ‘Italia ’57’ series.   Photos by Stanisław Broniecki, beauty by Marianna Yurkiewicz.