Definining Elegance. Lemaire AW19

I could write and write about each and signle look coming from Christophe Lemaire and Sarah-Linh Tran‘s autumn-winter 2019 collection. Everything’s just so beautifully balanced and refined. Lemaire might be defining elegance this season – I mean, just look at this all-knitted look feauturing a sweater with big shoulders and waist-highlighting button-down skirt. From masculine coats to evening dresses, there isn’t a thing about the collection that isn’t compelling. The blouson jackets with leg-o-mutton sleeves have this chic, slightly vintage-y Parisian feel about them, just like leather jackets or business-ready blazers. Some things don’t change, like Lemaire’s season-to-season goodness – and I’m fine with that.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s – Timeless. Lemaire AW19

Lemaire’s menswear collections aren’t obvious, but also not over-complicated. They aren’t drowned in Instaworthy runways. They just are, presented in a showroom and in their look-book. But what’s most admirable about Christophe Lemaire and Sarah-Linh Tran’s contribution to menswear is that their designs always look timeless. Even if the designers mention any inspirations, those musings are very personal and not too literal. “There are some references, like Nick Cave. His Birthday Party period, when he used to have his suits made in Hong Kong. Slightly ’70s,” Christophe said. But the two wanted to focus more on the shape this season. Tran added: “The silhouette is maybe more defined, and the shoulder more shaped than in previous seasons.” From loosely fitted blazers and classic trench coats to signature ‘work’ shirts and Portuguese, heeled boots, I want every single thing from this line-up. Even the berets, made in collaboration with Laulhère, look compelling. While Sarah and Christophe surely had something else on their mind, I kind of see their autumn-winter 2019 collection as the wardrobe of some Paris-based archaeologist, maybe historian, who actually looks very chic (in an intellectual way)… just a thought.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

One Universe. Lemaire SS19

For Christophe Lemaire and Sarah Linh Tran, women’s and men’s wardrobe is one universe. That’s why they presented both on one runway this season. In terms of clothes, this was a classic Lemaire collection, without much risks. Shirt dress in cotton ventile, double breasted jacket, baggy skirt in pigment dye poplin, oversized, knotted trench coat (as seen on Tasha Tilberg), linen sailor pants, large bum bags in nappa leather… clothes that are in constant demand. Majority of the looks is genderless (for example the coats, that are cut in the same way for both women and men). I adore Lemaire, but I wish the designers tried new territories next time – this collection looks very much like their last few seasons, just kept in different colour palette. If not for the live music and the models’ eventual dancing, that would be a rather stiff presentation, gone completely unnoticed in the Paris fashion week crowd.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s / Interim. Lemaire SS19

lemaire

In a way, that’s just a preview of Lemaire‘s spring-summer 2019 collection. The label has decided to show both, menswear and womenswear, in one integrated show during the usual Paris fashion week schedule this autumn. But, what to expect (and already love!) from Christophe Lemaire and Sarah Linh Tran? Delightful pajamas made in collaboration with Sunspel. Footwear produced together with sustainable French brand called Veja. The real-life look-book also shared a glimpse at raincoats, gorgeous knits and some very charming samples from the woman’s wardrobe. “We shot the pictures on the street in Pantin, just outside Paris,” said Christophe, “and a lot of passersby had something to say. Many people liked the shoes. And this one woman was really excited by the volume and the pleated pants; she said, ‘Ah, it takes me back to the ’80s!’” Fashion is fashion, but it’s the people who decide what’s in. Lemaire, without much fuss, is always in.

Slajd1-kopiaSlajd2-kopiaSlajd3Slajd4-kopia

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.