7 Rue de Moussy

Le Marais’ 7 rue de Moussy is the address that gives me those good goosebumps. It’s Azzedine Alaïa’s flagship store, which is also the brand’s headquarters (and as well used to be Alaïa‘s home and studio, just above the spacious boutique). I love this place so much and I will never forget seeing the man himself here few years ago, taking a run through the racks and disappearing behind the doors of his atelier. His spirit is all over the place. This didn’t change at all throughout the time. And what’s most important, the soul of Azzedine is preserved by the maison, and thankfully not “rebranded”. There’s the untouched Julian Schnabel artwork leaning against the wall. The fitting room, where I imagine Naomi Campbell tries on her dresses. All the design treasures Azzedine hand-picked himself for the space. For me, it’s one of the most sentimental places in Paris. A post on Association Azzedine Alaïa and its foundation is coming up!

7 rue de Moussy / Paris

Buly 1803 in Paris

Starting in the late 18th century, the famed “Bully”, established in 1803 on Rue Saint-Honoré in Paris, made a name for himself (which he then wore with a double consonant). At the turn of the 19th century, perfumers were still the heirs of the craftsmen from the Ancien Régime, and the keepers of their trade secrets. The fervour of perfumes followed in the wake of a fresh openness to the world and to its novel, sometimes exotic flowers – as with Joséphine de Beauharnais, who imported to France and acclimatized new olfactory species and audacities. Bully welcomed the advances of science and cosmetics to formulate his own inventions in form of perfumes and scented oils. Among these, his remarkable skin care products achieved lasting fame. Throughout the Golden Century of beauty, which witnessed the invention of the first formulations of modern cosmetics and perfumery, the ‘officine’ gradually established itself as a trend-setter.

Today, Buly 1803 is reborn in Paris, on rue Bonaparte 6 in the sixth arrondissement, with a different spelling and a refreshed concept. Visiting their boutique was like entering a cabinet de curiosités, falling hard for the opulent marble furniture, antique illustrations on the walls, and Japanese porcelain flacons costing 3000 euros and up. The revamped water-based perfume line surprises and intrigues with compositions such as Peruvian Heliotrope, Kiso Yuzu, Sevillian Brigarade or Mexican Tuberose. Buly 1803 is a true gem and it’s quite unbelievable to find brands like this in our world of fast, mass-consumption.

Photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Dries Van Noten in Paris

The magic of Dries Van Noten oozes in his Antwerp flagship store and at his two, close to each other locations in Paris. The women’s and men’s stores, located on the Left Bank, could actually do accomodation services, because they are so gorgeous and it would be a fantasy to stay here for a day or two (ok, a week). Dries’ clothes look great, that’s a well-known fact, but in his stores they reach new dimensions of refined, eccentric elegance. It’s visible that each detail, from the tapestries to the flower bouquets, are well-considered and fit for Van Noten’s universe. Love.

7 Quai Malaquais & 9 Quai Malaquais / Paris

Photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Vivant

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Arnaud Lacombe and Pierre Touitou’s Vivant reopened towards the end of 2018, and the place went full throttle. With some incredible organic wines, impressive white marble bar table and the view on the chefs working in front of you, this place is the hottest address in Paris right now. Raw cuttlefish rolled like a cigar and marinated in aged soy sauce and shiso leaves; braised chuck steak topped with the mysterious “Mloukhya” sauce; the signature glazed tuna which sparks entire conversations. Book in advance.

43 Rue des Petites Écuries

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Photos by Edward Kanarecki.