Eating in Lisbon

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Lisbon is not only great art, mind-blowing architecture and stylish concept stores. It’s also all about food! And really good food, I should admit. And no, the don’t only eat baskets of freshly picked clementines here (as pictured above) – even though a fresh juice made of them is an actual seventh wonder. Here’s my short guide around some of my favourite eating spots and dinner places in the Portuguese capital.

If you’re planning your dinner at Cervejaria Ramiro, read carefully the following: beware of the queue! No reservations, which is usual for the best restaurants in Lisbon. But before you induldge yourself in all those spider crabs, razor clams, tiger prawns and goose barnacles, you’ve got to wait for about half to one hour outside. No worries – they serve beer for the patient ones. And the waiting is really worth it.

Av. Almirante Reis N.1

After an exhausting excursion to Alfama’s most important churches and a few hours of walking down and up the hilly streets, Pois Café is the right place to take a break. The interior is an eclectic mix of brick, vintage furniture and local artists’ paintings. Food is simple, but tasty – take the plate with mozzarella bufala or the passion fruit cheesecake. A fast brunch / lunch in an intriguing spot.

R. de São João da Praça 93-95

A Chevicheria is Lisbon’s hottest dining place. The huge octopus hanging above the bar tempts to enter and try Kiko Martins’ signature seafood menu. Whether it’s a tuna ceviche with radish or St. Jacob’s mussels, you won’t be dissapointed with the restaurant, that’s for sure. Again, no reservations, possibility of waiting in a queue. But the locals know what’s good!

Rua Dom Pedro V129

Morgadinha de Alfama is not a busy, fancy kind of place, but it has one of the most romantic patios in town. And delightful tapas! It’s especially refreshing when the temperature rises and you can hide hear from the scorching sun.

Beco do Alfurja 2

Everybody heard of Time Out Market in Lisbon. You can eat anything here, from the best pata negra ham and fried squids to soaps in the most stylish packages at A Vida Portuguesa corner. The food here is good, true, but the prices are slightly too high. Also, don’t expect Berlin’s market coziness – Time Out is much more commercialised. But the flower shop located inside is a total must visit – even if you can’t buy a bouquet due to approaching airplane travel. Just beautiful.

Av. 24 de Julho 49

In case of traditional Portuguese patisseries, Padaria e Pastelarias Panificação R. Sao Roque is unrivalled. Try tapas served in a more contemporary manner at Tapisco. I hope that the next time I’m in Lisbon, I will discover equally delicious places. Any recommendations, maybe?

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Markthalle IX

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That’s Berlin – you go down the street and suddenly find a place you never want to leave. Exactly this happened to us when we came across Markthalle IX in the Kreuzberg district. As the name suggests, it’s a ‘market hall’. But not that usual. Actually, it contains dozens of local butcheries, stalls with bio-vegetables and pop-ups of Berlin’s trending restaurants. There are freshly cut flowers and wild oysters; there’s salami in every possible size and taste and even Italian patisserie. The best part – you can try everything. And eat one of the best lunches in Berlin, if you find an empty bench! I tell you, this place is worth a visit.

Eisenbahnstraße 42/43 / Berlin

When in Gdańsk

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Gdańsk, a Polish port city, is beautiful – especially, during the festive season. We’ve dropped into the town on our way to the New Year’s Eve destination, and honestly, couldn’t leave for a while. All those details of the Old Market, the truly captivating architecture pearls and the jaw-dropping heights of St. Mary’s Church made us stay here till the evening. If you ever visit Gdańsk, you can’t miss Corrèze. Located in the modernised dockyard district, the restaurant induldges its guests with exquisite cuisine. Corrèze specializes in creating taste wonders out of local ingredients. We tried the fallow deer and goose giblets goulash and the Kashubian goose thigh confit – all of that was beyond! Just ike the delicious meringue cake. Also, there’s nothing better than a pre-New Years walk near the cannal with a lit view on the historic city. Gdańsk, love you.

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Fish & Eat in Antwerp

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Antwerp’s Fish & Eat is not one of those ‘fashionable’ restaurants, that’s for sure. But underrated places are often much, much better than the ones that are currently ‘it’. I will never forget the smoked mussels served in a can, the restaurant’s signature dish. Those tiny prawns on ice were a great appetizer, while the classical sole with home-made fries  was more than delightful. Once you get here (after some heavy, Belgian fashion shopping…), don’t miss a chance to order the very well-supplied plateau de mer!

Volkstraat 65 / Antwerp

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Photos by Edward Kanarecki

Spindler

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On a busy Monday evening like this, there’s a certain place I  wish I could go to for dinner. It’s Spindler, Kreuzberg’s beloved brasserie. Located in a historic building beside a river shore, the restaurant’s rooms (which actually are over 100 years old) were reconstructed by Karolina Preis and revamped with handcrafted furniture, modern art and selected antiques. Spindler’s ever-changing menu offers seasonal treats as well as classics: Haveländer pork belly, king oyster mushrooms, cod with couscous or the Sirloin steak. Whether you’re here for a meal with friends or a weekend brunch in the sun-drenched garden, I tell you: this place won’t disapoint.

Paul-Lincke-Ufer 42/43 / Berlin

Photos by Edward Kanarecki

Concierge Coffee in Berlin

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Concierge Coffee, Benjamin Pates’s and Namy Nosratifard’s baby, is there for you to serve the best flat white in entire Kreuzberg, just along the canal. Fresh pastries and house juices are here, too, nicely displayed on the counter (with some quite tongue-in-cheek taxidermy pets in the front). But it isn’t only coffee that attracts Berliners to Concierge, Kreuzberg’s best kept secret. It’s the atmosphere of this low-key spot that makes it so undeniably cool. The coffee bar is hidden away in an old gatekeepers room, while the beverages are served through a small window in the back. Sit with the locals on matching the cups, blue stools, and enjoy the street view!

Paul-Lincke-Ufer 39-40 / Berlin

Photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Cocolo Ramen X-Berg

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Cocolo Ramen X-Berg is said to have the best ramen in Berlin. I guess the huge queues for a seat are the best evidence for that. I ate the Wantan ramen with shrimp wontons and it was the actual 7th wonder happening in my mouth. Ramen often tends to be too fatty, but this one was just perfect for me – light, but with its recognizable essence. Gyoza dumplings are also worth a try. The industrial interior with long, wooden tables is as charming as the outdoors space. Sitting there on a sunny day and observing the diverse street life of Kreuzberg is something I can do everyday! While sipping Cocolo’s home-made, signature lemonade, of course.

Paul-Lincke-Ufer 39-40 / Berlin

Photographs by Edward Kanarecki.

Visiting Toruń

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Toruń is one of the oldest cities in Poland, which over centuries was the home for people of diverse backgrounds and religions. Back in the Medieval times, the city was considered the most culturally and technologically advanced centre in Europe. Moreover, during the World War II, Toruń appeared to be one of the few cities in the country, which was left with no damage. No wonder why the Old Town, fully preserved, looks so beautiful and breathes with its history up to now. Nearly every building here is made of brick, while the churches (the cathedral, dating back to 1236, is a must-see!) are  untouched. Walking down the sun-drenched streets, you wonder whether you’re strolling around Brugge or an old Tuscan village…

If you’re here for one day, make sure to visit the District Museum (or Toruń Regional Museum), which is located in the historic Rathaus. The ground floor is an impressive collection of Gothic art and local craftsmanship, while the upper floors hold paintings of Polish artists from XVIII to XX century. Currently, there’s an exhibition of modern art, which presents some of Zdzisław Beksiński, Władysław Hasior and Łukasz Korolkiewicz’s rare works.

In case of culinary experiences, Toruń is recognised for its famous gingerbread. But if you want something less clichéd, try a more niche, off-the-crowd spots. Od Dechy Do Dechy is a cozy, book-filled bar with signature beers, home-made pastries and coffee. Sometimes, they sell second-hand books and vinyls. Perfect place to chill after a busy day.

To sum up, Toruń is totally worth a stay, especially in the summer!

Photos by Edward Kanarecki.

At Charlotte

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Just like a well-kept secret, Charlotte is hidden. Walk into the beautifully tiled patio in the heart of Wroclaw, and you suddenly appear in the most Parisian bistro. Charlotte serves home-made eclairs, macaroons and fruit tarts, but not only. With an impressive selection of signature jams and French wines, Charlotte is Wroclaw’s go-to spot for both, breakfast and late lunch. Don’t forget to grab a brioche or a crispy loaf of bread, baked   earlier in the morning.

ul. Świętego Antoniego 2/4 / Wroclaw

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.