Tina Modotti. Erdem SS20

This season, Erdem Moralioglu‘s collection was inspired by Tina Modotti, who photographed Mexico’s sights and people’s daily life, simultaneously participating in bohemian circles with Mexican intellectuals and artists such as Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Erdem characterized his spring-summer 2020 muse as “a romantic and revolutionary, a woman of principle. Each outfit was like a postcard from a part of her life.” The pictures of Modotti’s life were the main reference behind Erdem’s voluminous, vibrant proportions, the exaggerated shape of yoke blouses, hand-made floral embroideries and the gorgeous fringed shawls. “It was the waistless-ness, tiers, the combination of Victorian dress and traditional dress that interested me,” he said. The season’s colours appeared to be as bold as the silhouette. Erdem had spent time at the Casa Luis Barragán in Mexico City, which already suggests the palette: the amazing, saturated cardamom, yellows, and pinks. Stunning.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Wren-girls. Simone Rocha SS20

The story behind Simone Rocha‘s phenomenal spring-summer 2020 might not be that obvious – especially if you’ve got nothing to do with Irish origins. “I was thinking about the Irish wren-boys, who go hunt and kill a wren on St. Stephen’s Day in Ireland—punkish boys who go knocking on doors, kind of like trick-or-treaters,” said the designer backstage. “So I wanted to bring that masculinity to the table, but also turn and look into the houses of the people whose doors they knock on – at the Delft china, the tablecloths, the wallpaper.” More explanation: it’s about the pre-Christian wren-boy tradition: the day-after-Christmas parade when men dress in straw outfits,  capture a wren, and knock on neighborhood doors to demand money. Some of the girls in Rocha’s line-up had wren feathers painted on their foreheads. The straw was used in basket bags, while in some looks it could have been spotted as an armor covering the dresses. Although the reference might have killed the collection with its heaviness, Rocha created something subtle, magical. Yes, magical. There were hints of something raw and ritualistic: blasts of folk music, straw sashes and crocheted raffia. The delicate blue-and-white ruffles and the nods to old tablecloths and curtains you can find in your relative’s attic brought even more of mystical nostalgia you feel charmed by as a kid. The floor-sweeping gowns that closed the show had something very witchy about them, even etheral. This collection instantly becomes one of my favourites of the season.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Chic Mixture. Victoria Beckham SS20

Victoria Beckham‘s spring-summer 2020 collection is her best for a long while. The show was an incredibly chic mixture of precise tailoring and feminine, floaty dresses inspired by silhouettes of past decades: bit of 20s, bit of 60, bit of 80s. “Lightness, ease and freedom” are the spirit of the collection, as Beckham told the press. It’s good to see that the designer finally freed herself from a Phoebe Philo-filled moodboard and tries something new, something different. The fluid-like dresses, the collection’s highlights, in green, beige and rust are feminine and sensual, yet sophisticated at the same time. Noting that Victoria launches her beauty line under her own brand this week, I’m sure she’s having a very, very good Monday.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Naturalness. Margaret Howell SS20

I feel like a dummy, because until this season, I’ve never really taken a serious look at Margaret Howell‘s fashion. Actually, I don’t think the designer calls her work ‘fashion’: it’s far, far from disposability and every season newness. The London-based label’s unfussy, quiet way of being is as charming, as the clothes it produces. The spring-summer 2020 is a classical Margaret Howell line-up: utilitarian, tailored, minimal, but not austere. The loosely-fitted, short-sleeved shirt-dress (that came in different colours and a Lucienne Day graphic pattern) is one of the very few pieces I’ve seen this season that instantly becomes the fine thing to really invest in. Suiting, with higher buttoning, looser cut jackets worn with tapering trousers tucked into slouchy socks and flat leather sandals, other times collared shirts atop Bermuda shorts. Everything kept in a beautiful, warm, earthy colour palette. It’s a yes, yes, yes!

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.