Camille Bidault Waddington for & Other Stories

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If you know my site for a while, you might have noticed that I never write about all the high street fashion brands and their events / special collections / collaborations. Well, here’s an exception: Camille Bidault Waddington for & Other Stories. When I saw the look-book images from this extraordinary capsule collection on Instagram earlier today, I was so, so pleasantly surprised. I mean, it’s Camille! The same Paris-based Camille, who’s most frequently behind the scenes, working as a stylist for independent magazines like The Gentlewoman, Purple, Holiday or Dazed & Confused. She’s also the woman who adds her final touch to Natacha Ramsay-Levi’s Chloé. And, she occasionally walks the Eckhaus Latta runway in New York. Shortly speaking, if you want the right person to co-operate with on a capsule, Camille is the perfect choice – not some oversponsored, unexperienced, flashy blogger.

Come 6th of September, and you will meet these friends in your nearest & Other Stories stationery store (or on-line): an over-sized trench coat, olive-green dresses and pants fit for autumn layering, pencil skirts with chic slits, beige camisoles with lace inserts, faux python skin pumps… at the first glance, it all looks like a remix of Phoebe Philo’s classics at Céline (Céline with an accent, mind you). But then, CBW wore all that two decades ago, and continues to dress like that today. How down-to-earth of her to share personal style favourites with a wider audience. That’s what I call a collab.

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A.P.C., M/M and Bruce

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I’ve recently scored the Transmission book by Jean Touitou on a discount at Voo Store, and I’m so, so surprised by some of the projects the founder of A.P.C. gave creative birth to. For example, back in 2008, the French label invited the art direction gurus from M/M Paris and the quite unlikely match –  Bruce Weber (he’s a risky topic, I know, but let’s acknowledge that the body of photography he created throughout his career is a masterpiece) –  to work on the advertising campaigns. For spring/summer, we’ve got Louis Eisner and Kim Noorda enjoying themselves on beach dunes, styled by Christopher Niquet. While for autumn-winter, we’ve got Gia Coppola enjoying a breakfast with her lover. This time, however, M/M and Bruce took Joe McKenna as the stylist. What I love about the two campaigns is the warmth conveyed by Weber, and the artistic touch brought by M/M Paris’ doodle-like logos. They feel realistic, yet magical at the same time.

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The Look – Lemaire AW18

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Autumn is in the air, no? The days of full moon. Leaves are gradually becoming yellow. Watching Nouvelle Vague films in the evenings. Forgetting about shorts and t-shirts. This Lemaire autumn-winter 2018 coat and layered shirting make me drool.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

The Designers of SS19

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Who to watch in the upcoming fashion month? I’ve decided to select the six designers that you’ve got to keep on your radar for spring-summer 2019. So, while we’re all waiting for September (and it’s lovely breeze), take a look at the names that will be everywhere in just a couple of weeks!

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Richard Quinn

His autumn-winter 2018 show in London was attended by the Queen, while the statement floral prints and exaggerated, lady-like volumes are the season’s absolute best-sellers. Those scarf maxi-dresses and puffas are the new classics. Yes, they are! Richard’s show in September is highly anticipated, just as the major debuts at the historical maisons (which I’m quite sceptic about…). Can’t wait to see which direction the designer takes this time. One thing’s quite sure – Quinn’s love for prints, which he produces himself at his studio, isn’t a one-time phenomenon.

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Pyer Moss

Kerby Jean Raymond makes activism a crucial component of his brand, Pyer Moss, being vocal about current problems that America faces today – from the current president to widespread social injustice. In his autumn-winter 2018 collection, the designer took black cowboys of the 19th century, including one of the first rodeo stars of the era, Bill Pickett, as inspiration. Moreover, that was the first season where Kerby sent out a line-up of womenswear, which consisted of streetwear sensibility, enormous knitwear and Wild West shirts. AND, that yellow Goddess dress as well. So good. But what else makes Pyer Moss a label to observe is the cultural diversity it embraces, not just in terms of model casting. Others are more than welcome to follow that path.

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Matthew Adams Dolan

Dolan’s denim jackets and signature shirt-dresses with exaggerated cuffs are perceived as the new ‘basics’. Why? Noting their couture-level tailoring, Matthew’s fashion is realistic and wearable, but far, far from trivial. It’s not about few good styling tricks or a thoroughly contrived Instagram ‘image’ that fuels the label. Dolan let’s the clothes do the talking for themselves, which is especially rare in the industry. The talented, young designer as well revises American fashion, creating the ultimate classics of 2018 (and for years ahead). SZA and Rihanna approve, just as the fact that Matthew became one of the finalists of this year’s LVMH prize. You better watch that spot.

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Molly Goddard

While looking at Molly Goddard’s last collection, I was just impressed with the way this young designer does everything so effortlessly, with so much joy. During the autumn-winter 2018 show, models stopped for a bottle of wine or a chat, in the middle of the kitchen-themed venue. Few seasons ago, Molly stormed the London fashion week with her over-sized tulle dresses and a cool, ‘what a girl likes’ mood. Now, the designer moves towards new territories of 90s crop-tops and gingham, so that she doesn’t feel trapped by her already beloved signature.

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Marine Serre

Manic Soul Machine is how the designer intriguingly titled her first runway collection – a cross-cultural, cross-everything dialogue. While demanding fashion seems to be a deficit today, Serre wants you to reflect on everything, from politics and spirituality to sex and society. Her distinct crescent moon print appeared on nearly everything (athletic bodysuits, shoes, headbands), but the designer’s ‘Futurewear’ as well involved plastic raincoats and motocross jackets.
 There’s something elusive about Marine Serre’s fashion – it’s hard to explain in one word. It’s ‘love’, ’emotions’, ‘future’, ‘intelligence’ – words that rarely can be used to describe clothes. However, they fit Marine’s work perfectly. Can’t wait to see what’s coming from this designer, really. Paris fashion week, prepare yourself!

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Magda Butrym

Although this Polish designer releases her look-books near the time the clothes hit the stores, I still consider her to be one of the names to watch for spring-summer 2019. Butrym’s autumn collection is largely inspired by the Wild West style and country music, but nothing’s too literal in here. The floral mini-dresses with over-sized shoulders and feather stoles are just a slight node to Dolly Parton’s over-the-top style. Rather think of a prairie girl hitting Paris (but this Paris, not the one in Texas). Other than that, we’ve got red velvet, meticulously embellished coats and gorgeous boots with attachable brooches (!). Hot.

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That’s my list. And how about you? Have you got a name (or two) that you’re very keen to follow this season?

All collages by Edward Kanarecki.