The Love for Details. Zanini SS20

Marco Zanini‘s name-sake label – Zanini – is the antidote for seeing too many big brands with their four or more collections a year that, simply speaking, lack any substance. Zanini is a quiet mega-talent, whose aesthetic and precision in making clothes isn’t based on random references and muses. His clothes are of the best possible quality, they are luxurious, but in a peaceful, logo-less way – they are investment pieces. His debut, autumn-winter 2019 collection, was a promise of great things to come. And here we are in the spring-summer 2020 season, and Marco impresses even more. All of the materials were uniquely developed for him, from the “crispy” checked cotton of a smock dress to the super-deluxe washed ivory satin of a tank dress, double-layered for ease of wear and comfort. Zanini pays attention to the smallest detail: the way a coat sleeve gathers at the elbow; the tie at the back of a mannish jacket that creates a womanly hourglass shape. The designer’s point of view has been at least partially formed by his roots – he’s Swedish on his mother’s side. “Scandinavia is in love with little details that you could call nothingness,” as he puts it. “But they are everything to me.” Love.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Calm Elegance. Prada SS20

No prints. No logos. Calm elegance. That’s the Prada I truly love. It’s been a while since Miuccia Prada did a collection that wasn’t focused on a motif, a fabric or a theme. Cotton tiered dresses worn with espadrilles, smooth leather suits, vintage-looking details (like 30s-inspired feather embroideries and sea-shell necklaces), soft knitted polos, a classic, black dress that isn’t too sheer or too goth… Every look involved a mix of textures (macramé, straw, velvet, calf, patent, rope, paillettes and others) and context (the beach, the office, a party, a weekend escape – you name it). Miuccia’s starting point for this collection was that “the person should be more important than the clothes,” and further, that “personal style is more important than clothes.” She was also hoping to make a point about simplicity, non-disposability, and “doing less.” After all, sustainability is also about investing in pieces you will wear for years. This is a delightful start of Milan fashion week.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.