#InstaLOVE – October 2018

@katerinajebb

I’m an Instagram maniac and I openly confess that I spend too much time on filtering my feed. But it’s irresistible, when you have so many great accounts to follow! If you are ready for a dose of beautifully curated walls, inspiring photos and delightful shots – see my October recommendations!

@griegst / Fine jewellery coming straight from Copenhagen. Griegst was founded back in 1963 by the Danish goldsmith and artist Arje Griegst (1938-2016). His jewellery is sought after by collectors all over the world, and among his prominent customers is the Danish Queen H.M. Margrethe II. Arje was a goldsmith who thought like a sculptor. Inspired by the Baroque and the Orient, his free sculptural form was a contrast to rigid modernism. Using his own customised cire perdue techniques he was able to sculpt pieces that vibrate with sensual energy in an almost hallucinatory alternate universe. In his hands, solid materials were rendered almost in their liquid state across jewellery and collaborations on tableware, flatware, glassware, chandeliers and sculptures. Today, the brand continuous to prosper with its fantastic goods that are inspired with Arje’s original designs. Their Instagram account is worth following, because a) those pieces make you day-dream, and b) the archive throwbacks are G-O-R-G-E-O-U-S.

@ndreaskronthaler / No, it’s not a typo! That’s Andreas Kronthaler’s Instagram. If you will cherish a picture of Vivienne Westwood (his wife) in Tyrol, standing next to a bunch of festively dressed cows, click that blue button right away. I did.

@cbnvintage / Another one from Copenhagen. Caroline Brille Brahe, the model (you might still know her as Brasch Nielsen), opened up her vintage wardrobe and it’s all about tie-dye Moncler puffas (already snatched by Ana Kras), 90s Versace Jeans Couture, Yves Saint Laurent beaded jackets and rare Hermès t-shirts. Insta-shopping is welcome. If you’re in Copenhagen, make sure to visit her (and her friends’) pop-up store at Atelier September (which by the way is her husband’s restaurant).

@vinccioslo / It’s getting quite Scandi in here. Vincci, a multi-brand store from Oslo, certainly loves the old Céline (and all the delightful details that appeared in the autumn-winter 2018 collection). Their regular pics of the last pre-Hedi pieces are candy for the eye.

@katerinajebb / Lately, I’m truly obsessed with Katerina Jebb’s works. In 1991 she was involved in a car accident which paralyzed her right arm – to resolve the inability to hold a camera, Jebb began to employ machines to make life-size images, primarily self-portraits lying herself down  on a high-resolution scanning machine. Progressively, she diversified, posing subjects and objects, exploring the medium in parallel with the expanding possibilities in digital technology. Jebb proceeded to remove parts of the scanner to facilitate maximum extension of the subject. The duration of each passage of the scanner echoed early photographic principles, being seven minutes long, therefore demanding of the sitter to lie motionless for 28 minutes. She created some of the most captivating portraits: think Michele Lamy, Marisa Berenson (dressed in Comme des Garçons) and Tilda Swinton. Recently, Jebb was commissioned by The Met to photograph some of the most incredible pieces from “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination” exhibition. I caught myself on adding each of her posts to my ‘saved’ folder.

AND, if you want to follow one more account on Instagram… why don’t you follow, ta-da, @designandculturebyed?

NET-A-PORTER Limited

Mad. Andreas Kronthaler Vivienne Westwood SS19

ANDREAS KRONTHALER VIVIENNE WESTWOOD

Andreas Kronthaler has gone fashion mad this season, in a good way. There’s no wonder why his life partner, Vivienne Westwood, looked so enchanted by this line-up. The models had fun, too. Some, instead of walking, chose to ride on scooters and skateboards. Dree Hemingway wore a red Thonet chair hat. Other models, muscular and all, wore tight underwear made in collaboration with Yasmine Eslami. Draped dresses made out of tapestry-like textile looked especially fantastic. The more approachable pieces – printed t-shirts and sporty jumpsuits – were visibly there to back up all that playful rhapsody, but looked matching.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Characters. Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood AW18

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Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood was a parade of characters: from Joan of Arc to haunted brides (and widows), that was a diverse outing. Vivienne and her partner,  Andreas, enjoy studying the different and break any kind of stereotypes. Here, boys wore ball dresses, while girls nailed over-sized pirate jackets. Nearly everything would have been superb about this collection if not the fact that the label stole an idea, or two, from London’s emerging, young designers. Even though they have publicly apologized Rottingdean Bazaar and Louise Gray for using their prints and slogans without permission, I just can’t understand how the designers’ studio thought no one would notice that in the first place? I mean, if not Vivienne, many of those brands wouldn’t be here with their explosive attitude today. And now, who’s appropriating whom?

Still, the collection is a bomb.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Europe. Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood SS17

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Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood is a love affair between those two designers both in fashion, and in life. It’s the second season where Andreas fully leads the main-line of Westwood’s punk-empire, and it’s madly good. Inspired with European cultures, Kronthaler took a glance at Slavic symbolism, and sent out a model wearing a voluminous, straw garment which might be a dress (or a coat). Heavily ornamented bustier necklines were exaggerated, too, but this time the direction turned to Marie Antoinette times and pre-revolution France. The model in a drifty, multi-coloured frame was an abstract vision of a woman at a typically Dutch market stall. It perceivable that the creative director is intrigued with Old Europe’s contrasts and history – he cleverly delivered those accents in a humorous, very dramatic way. But the collection isn’t only about the past. It smartly moves the topic of feminism (and femininity), so something that still triggers so many intense discussions in few European countries. A jersey dress with trompe l’oeil illustration of naked body, or a violently ripped skirt which exposed spring-summer 2017 swimwear were the most thoughtful, yet catchy looks.

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