And Time Goes By… Givenchy SS23

After exiting Burberry, Riccardo Tisci should return to Givenchy. It would be a perfect homecoming, because it seems only he could understand how to direct the brand in contemporary times. Seasons come and go, and Matthew Williams still has no clue what’s Givenchy’s identity, and what’s worse, what’s his role in writing the house’s history. It’s really difficult to find the spirit of Givenchy, properly revisited, and any signs of Williams’ input in the spring-summer 2023 collection. Even Carine Roitfeld’s styling didn’t help (quite ironic – she was a key person for the brand during Tisci’s reign). The line-up was a mash-up of familiar things. We’ve got some random-looking Chanel tweeds. There’s early Demna for Balenciaga vibe. There’s Hedi Slimane’s Celine, over and over again. Hoodies worn under blazers, styled with cargo shorts, seem to be the biggest takeaway from the entire line-up, but we’ve seen that styling trick many, many times on other runways. The eveningwear had no novelty in it, as it referenced Hubert De Givenchy’s archives in form of boring „re-editions”. And it felt completely out of place after a line-up filled with denim and combats. The inconsistency of the collection was the most striking thing about it. Also, what’s the point of having an outdoor presentation in October, especially in drizzling Paris? The pouring rain made the whole event feel even more depressing and frustrating. Williams’ contract at Givenchy is coming to an end, and I doubt it will be prolonged. The brand should really consider the choice of next creative director, because with the flow of time, the brand is becoming a wreck.   

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.
Don’t forget to follow Design & Culture by Ed on Instagram!

NET-A-PORTER Limited

Razzle Dazzle. Tom Ford SS23

Tom Ford was in the headlines in July when it was reported that he was exploring the potential sale of his brand. The designer has said little in the months since, but industry talk has had it that the deal could be worth $3 billion. So it’s no wonder he put on the razzle dazzle for his New York Fashion Week finale show, packing the room with celebs – Madonna among them – and sending out a collection with Hollywood Boulevard and Elvis-in-Las-Vegas vibes, heavy on the pastel lamé, Nudie Suit-style embroideries, and black lingerie lace. Ford wrote the book of nudity – so trendy this season among other American designers – nearly 30 years ago. Spring-summer 2022 collection looked back on his different chapters, the sheer tees and black satin bra tops evoking a Gucci spring 2001 show, the deconstructed chiffon dresses reminiscent of a YSL outing for spring 2002. Friends and collaborators who have been with him since those days, like Carine Roitfeld, Elizabeth Saltzman, and Lisa Eisner, were in attendance, but he had things for the Instagram generation, too. A year ago he was talking about the ways in which social media has changed fashion, killing off subtlety in favor of high impact. The sequin patches decorating cargo shorts and the fringed cowboy shirts here certainly qualified. The menswear was slightly more tempered, but not entirely. A hot pink zoot suit was accompanied by a necktie that looked wider and shorter than recent examples. The lace boxers made made the audience scream.

For all the glossy surfaces and metallic shine, however, there was an undeniable melancholic undercurrent. When the daywear section concluded, a soundtrack of upbeat ’80s hits was swapped out for Freddie Mercury singing “Time Waits for No One.” Ford lost his husband Richard Buckley nearly a year ago. On Saturday, the photographer William Klein died, and this week the industry mourned Roxanne Lowit, who was among the first photographers to romance the behind-the-scenes action at runway shows. One of Lowit’s early subjects was Pat Cleveland, a frequent model for Yves Saint Laurent, and she was in the audience that evening, too. The pandemic has accelerated a generational shift the reverberations of which will only become more pronounced. Nothing stays the same, but Ford has his sexy extrovert signatures, and he’s sticking with them – all the way down to the cheeky lace underthings.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.
Don’t forget to follow Design & Culture by Ed on Instagram!

NET-A-PORTER Limited

You Do You. Tom Ford SS18

Slide1

Wherever I look, I see a long feature about the importance and potential of Tom Ford. Business of Fashion did one recently. New York Mag had it in August, exclusively sharing bits on the designer’s work behind the spring-summer 2018 collection. All of the magazines praise Tom Ford for his work at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent, for his venture in the film industry (like Nocturnal Animals) and most of all, his own brand with commercially succesful beauty line, men’s ready-to-wear and growing womenswear. Is Tom Ford’s PR working night and day, lately? Or maybe just in the year of 2017 the fashion industry decided to agree on one thing – Tom Ford is boss. And his fashion, season-to-season, wherever he designs, says you do you. Really, no else does Tom Ford as well as, gasp, Tom Ford.

There were rumours that Ford is planning to do a loud 90s revival – and that was certainly true. Backless jumpsuits, shoulder pads in denim, killer puchsia and lots of bling-bling were present, giving New York fashion week a glamorous kick-off. Don’t think it was nostalgic, as nostalgia in fashion often ends looking dusty and pretentious. That was a sleek line-up of ultra-glossy and great-body-demanding clothes, with no deeper meanings. That’s a collection that you look at with a relaxed, optimist eye at the beginning of the fashion month triathlon. Surely not like at a show of the last few days that you would confuse with Balmain and rather skip. But still, Ford is in a very, very good form, and what’s more, on his own terms.

Slide1-kopia 2Slide6Slide5Slide4Slide3Slide2Slide7

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Roitfeld’s Place

zdjęcie 1Christian Restoin knew that he and his wife, Carine, would buy their apartment even before they saw it. “When I spotted the building, I felt it was for us” he recalls. “The localisation and the view are just perfect.” Carine Roitfeld is the ex editor-in-chief of Vogue Paris and the owner of CR Fashion Book while Restoin is the former owner of Equipment. As for the flat, it hadn’t been touched since the 60’s. To get into the shape, they called up the English architect David Chipperfield. The idea was to create something pure, without touching the historical features which give the flat its spirit. The fireplaces and mouldings remained firmly in place and hand-picked selection of design classics (like Mies Van Der Rohe metal cable chairs) installed. The apartment seems to be simple, but a lot of heart was taken into it… in other words, it’s purely parisienne, and possibly that was the main aim.

zdjęcie 2

zdjęcie 3

zdjęcie 4

zdjęcie 5zdjęcie-kopia