The 2010s / Simone Rocha AW19

Believe it or not – I can’t! – but we’re heading towards a new millenium. So, how do you choose the most important collections, designers and labels of the decade? The ones that made an actual impact in the 2010s? Well, it’s not an easy task. It all began in September 2009 with New York’s spring-summer 2010 shows and ended when the autumn-winter 2019 haute couture shows wrapped in Paris. Few thousands of shows, by the way. There will be 19 posts (that’s really the only possible minimum!) reminding about the best – and if not the best, then strongly influencing – moments in fashion.

Simone Rocha‘s woman-for-women AW19 collection.

Talented women with their distinct style rule in London. There’s Molly Goddard, Victoria Beckham, Mary Katrantzou, Roksanda Ilincic, Surpiya Lele. And there’s Simone Rocha, whose autumn-winter 2019 was one of the very best collections I’ve seen that season. Rocha designs for women – and women love her. Seeing her runway graced by women of different ages, colour and body types was a female power moment, yes, but also an ode to the brand’s clients who trust Simone every season. Chloë Sevigny, Tess McMillan, Kristen Owen, Lily Cole, Sara Grace Wallerstedt, Ugbad Abdi… whether models or not, runway veterans or bold newcomers, all those faces are amazing individuals and characters. And, also, it’s an ultimate proof that full-skirted dresses and coats aren’t only meant for 20-somethings, just like organza see-throughs, bras worn over trench coats and opulent headbands. The collection was a study of female eroticism, a debate between being the object of desire and owning it. As the designer put it in her own words, “it was a about intimacy and privacy, security and insecurity”. Rocha looked at Michael Powell’s disturbing films (like ‘Peeping Tom’, the voyeuristic horror), but also returned to her long-time inspiration – Louise Bourgeois. The artist investigates the subject of sex and tenderness in her works, which as well often takes a darker turn. “I found her series of weavings which she’d made with fabric from her own clothes particularly beautiful,” Simone said. The spiderweb embroideries and prints Rocha used for puffball coats and dresses were made in collaboration with the Louise Bourgeois Foundation – could you wish for a more heartwarming artist appreciation moment? Still, while the themes behind the collection might be not exactly joyous and lightweight, the models – we see you, Chloë – were all smiley and visibly proud to be walking that outstanding show. This line-up could not end up in my 2010s favourites!

Collage by Edward Kanarecki. Chloë Sevigny wearing Simone Rocha AW19, photographed by Harley Weir and styled by Robbie Spencer for Dazed & Confused.

Chloë Sevigny x Régime des Fleurs

100 ml of pure heaven. I’m talking about Little Flower, the perfume made in collaboration between Régime des Fleurs, the fragrance label founded in Los Angeles by Alia Raza and Ezra Woods, and Chloë Sevigny, the film and fashion icon. Little Flower is Régime des Fleurs’ provocative take on Sevigny’s favorite bloom – the rose. Dewy, romantic and fleshy, with a woody musk finish. With black tea, bleeding heart (it’s actually a flower name, but then… who knows?), blackcurrant bud, peony, palo santo incense, pomelo, honeysuckle and a precious Ottoman rose absolute. I love Chloë Sevigny, I love Régime des Fleurs, I love roses – so I’m dying to try this perfume out.

Chloë Sevigny photographed by Inez & Vinoodh and styled by Haley Wollens.

Woman for Women. Simone Rocha AW19

Talented women with their distinct style rule in London. There’s Marta Jakubowski and Molly Goddard. There’s Victoria Beckham and Mary Katrantzou. And there’s Simone Rocha, whose autumn-winter 2019 was one of the very best collections I’ve seen this season. Rocha designs for women – and women love her. Seeing her runway graced by women of different ages, colour and body types was a female power moment, yes, but also an ode to the brand’s clients who trust Simone every season. Chloë Sevigny, Tess McMillan, Kristen Owen, Lily Cole, Sara Grace Wallerstedt, Ugbad Abdi… whether models or not, runway veterans or bold newcomers, all those faces are amazing individuals and characters. And, also, it’s an ultimate proof that full-skirted dresses and coats aren’t only meant for 20-somethings, just like organza see-throughs, bras worn over trench coats and opulent headbands. The collection was a study of female eroticism, a debate between being the object of desire and owning it. As the designer put it in her own words, “it was a about intimacy and privacy, security and insecurity”. Rocha looked at Michael Powell’s disturbing films (like ‘Peeping Tom’, the voyeuristic horror), but also returned to her long-time inspiration – Louise Bourgeois. The artist investigates the subject of sex and tenderness in her works, which as well often takes a darker turn. “I found her series of weavings which she’d made with fabric from her own clothes particularly beautiful,” Simone said. The spiderweb embroideries and prints Rocha used for puffball coats and dresses were made in collaboration with the Louise Bourgeois Foundation – could you wish for a more heartwarming artist appreciation moment? Still, while the themes behind the collection might be not exactly joyous and lightweight, the models – we see you, Chloë – were all smiley and visibly proud to be walking that outstanding show.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki, feauturing a painting by Genieve Figgis. 

#InstaLOVE – November 2017

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@haleywollens

I am an Instagram maniac and I openly confess that I spend too much time on filtering my feed. But it’s irresistible, when you have so many great accounts to follow! If you’re ready for a dose of beautifully curated walls, inspiring photos and delightful shots – see my November recommendations!

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@hobomag / This very ‘normal’ photo of Tilda Swinton, taken by Juergen Teller, is the most striking thing I’ve seen for months on Instagram. No explanations needed!

@marrakech_brooklyn / Who doesn’t love an eternally chic mood-feed? The one curated by Paul Rowland is my latest favourite, with some great Debbie Harry S&M / Lauren Hutton in mud moments.

@robbiespencer / Robbie Spencer is Dazed & Confused Magazine’s creative director. His Instagram feed is solely dedicated to his work. He posts rarely, but when he does, you just want to ‘bookmark’ each post. Whether it’s Lily McMenamy in a Balenciaga couture gown and Robert Quinn’s houndstooth body or Junya Watanabe neo-punks, Spencer is one of the brightest minds behind London’s fashion scene.

@haleywollens / Haley Wollens is a stylist, who doesn’t necessarily want to style the editorials in the most ‘safe’ way – the looks rather disturb, than please the advertisers. Also, she works with Chloë Sevigny, dressing her in Saint Laurent and Y / Project. That’s quite a match!

AND, if you want to follow one more account on Instagram… why don’t you follow, ta-da, @designandculturebyed?

 

Café Henrie

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This place used to be a garage owned by a hot-dog booth. Now it is the most fashionable address in the Lower East Side. Café Henrie in the newest initiative of André Saraiva, a famous graffiti artist, who for many years has been a soul of Parisian parties and fashion events. His projects include the design of seductive Hotel Amour and chic Castel Paris. And then… he found out he needed a place in New York, where he could drink a delicious cup of coffee. Just a few steps away from his studio.

The interior reflects André’s eclectic aesthetics. There are the timeless benches of Jean Prouvé which for years have been collected at the Parisian flea markets. Pink neons designed by Petra Collins hang in the toilets. Colourful, ceramic vessels designed by  Peter Shire (one of members of the Memphis Group) are a good reason to take an Instagram-perfect picture. Café Henrie is constantly changing and the owner regularly invites his favourite artists to co-create this unique place.

And yet, Café Henrie is not only about its interior. It’s the food, and the signature menu of Camille Becerra that stands behind the restaurant’s success. Favourite dish of  New Yorkers?  „Dragon Bowl“, a bowl filled to the rim with avocado, herbs, pickled veggies and garden salad. Vegan nachos served with mysteriously called sauces (such as Beet Tahini or Gentlemen’s Relish), „Persian” meatballs or tea-and-ginger chicken are only some of the menu’s delicacies that attract everyone at Henrie.

Thanks to Chloë Sevigny herself, who is a frequent guest and a friend with André, Café Henrie is a cult spot. But at the same time, this place seems to be one of the most laid-back in the city, far from the turmoil of fashionable districts.

116 Forsyth Street / New York

Initially posted by me here.

Warm / Mood

Cy Twombly home in Rome

Cy Twombly’s house in Rome

Christophe Lemaire Fall 2010 HC

Ajak Deng at Christophe Lemaire Haute Couture AW10

Chloe Sevigny HART+ LESHKINA for Commons & Sense Magazine

Chloe Sevigny by HART+LËSHKINA for Commons & Sense Magazine

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

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Jamilla Hoogenboom by Benjamin Vnuk for Crash