Polish Jazz. MISBHV SS19

misbhvFor a moment, let’s switch from resort look-books and New York’s off-the-schedule runways to Warsaw’s socrealist icon – Palace of Culture. Few days ago, Natalia Maczek and Tomek Wirski did their spring-summer 2019 runway show for the first time in Warsaw. MISBHV stands for so many things: to some, it’s a go-to streetwear label favoured by the big names (Kylie and all). For others, it’s an internationally recognized label that sells in stores among Vetements and Raf Simons. And the other others (like my friends, for instance) know it for great hoodies with intriguing prints.

This season, however, Maczek and Wirski wanted to explore new fields and do something different than usual. Having deep interests in the Polish 50s and 60s, the designers immersed themselves in a theme that doesn’t come up to you instantly when thinking of the brand. Jazz, or rather “Polish Jazz” (as the collection’s name suggests), became the season’s key-point. Moreover, MISBHV invited Rosław Szaybo, the legendary Polish graphic designer (who did album covers for Miles Davis, Janis Joplin and, of course, the cult “Polish Jazz” series) to collaborate on the prints. Blurring the lines between womenswear and menswear, the label’s latest offering includes flowing dresses, over-sized blazers, bike shorts, PVC coats and headscarves (a beautiful nod to Slavic culture!). But there are MISBHV classics as well, like the WARSZAWA print or friendly-to-the-public t-shirts. Polish fashion keeps on evolving, slowly, but it does. And seeing brands like MISBHV having such progress, and executing their visions so well, makes me really proud.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki featuring Wojciech Plewiński’s photograph of Warsaw; Rosław Szaybo’s album covers.

SSENSE

Manic Soul Machine. Marine Serre AW18

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Even though Marine Serre is relatively fresh on the fashion scene, it seems she’s been her for ever. Manic Soul Machine is how the designer intriguingly titled her first runway collection – and noting the cross-cultural, cross-everything approach we’ve learned from her spring-summer 2018 presentation – it was certain Marine wouldn’t disappoint. While demanding fashion seems to be a deficit today, Serre wants you to reflect on everything, from politics and spirituality to sex and society. Her already-signature crescent moon print appeared on nearly everything (athletic bodysuits, shoes, headbands), but the designer’s ‘Futurewear’ as well involves plastic raincoats and motocross jackets. But what really surprises here is the ‘scarf’ theme (see the dresses and skirts) that contrasts with the quite heavy, utilitarian direction of the collection. Still, there are so many other garments to love and appreciate this season. And, the bags, that I firstly thought were lanterns, but then realised were haute gym bags covered in printed fabric.

There’s something elusive about Marine Serre’s fashion – it’s hard to explain in one word. It’s ‘love’, ’emotions’, ‘future’, ‘intelligence’ – words that rarely can be used to describe clothes. However, they fit Marinne’s work perfectly.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Overpowered. Love.

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There are many reasons to adore Róisín Murphy. From her days with Moloko to the Italian-disco inspired EP titled Mi senti, this idiosyncratic Irish singer is a true gem. Even if you’re not a total sucker for her electronic tunes, you’ve got to admit that her style is bomb. While today she rather wears Vetements tea-dresses and garments coming fresh from graduate designers’ studios, back in her Overpowered period Murphy wore the most extravagant garments coming from, for example, Viktor & Rolf (she had a life performance at the brand’s spring-summer 2010 fashion show as well). But also, she had the most memorable Gareth Pugh coat moment in the video-clip of the album’s namesake track. Later, in Let Me Know, Róisín graciously danced and messed around in a cheesy bistro, wearing a Maison Margiela cape and bold fuchsia gloves (that was the moment I fell in love with fashion, really, at age of eight). And today, when I listen to Dear Miami or You Know Me Better, it’s unbelievable that Murphy was more ‘2017’ than any other musician today. Back in 2007!

Amsterdam Scenes

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Although I’ve been to Amsterdam at the beginning of September, I feel the need to post some of the scenes and snaps from this very energetic, always on-the-go city. The Dutch capital is all about tiles, greenery, bikes (of course) and chic dogs with their Céline totes. That time, I also realised that Amsterdam is such a treasure chest of antique books (at one of the well-hidden markets, I bought a vintage Sotheby’s catalogue for just 2,50 euros – quite proud of myself!). Take a look below.

 

Cornerstones. Marine Serre SS18

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There’s magical aura surrounding Marine Serre‘s work. Maybe it’s because of the feeling of prejudice-free love that is translated so well in the Paris-based designer’s fashion? In case you don’t know: Serre was awarded the 2017 LVMH Prize, having only one collection under her belt. ‘Radical Call for Love‘ – her first collection – was a visual comment on “urgency and contemporaneity by the tragic events in Paris and Brussels in 2015 and 2016.” Marine’s message was presented in a metaphorical way: Islamic symbols were transformed into logo-like branding and faux-Nike headbands (“it’s political and it’s not political. It’s much more than a crescent moon; it also represents how we all felt”), while carpet-like prints clashed with Byzantine florals. ‘Cornerstones’ is the continuation of the first season, and the 25-year-old designer looks forward to a more practical, not basic, offering. “What’s important for me is to be able to connect to contemporary daily life,” says Serre, “that you need to drive, to run.” That’s why, other than athletic stretch bodies in moon motif, there are denim jackets and go-to leggings. The gowns, that can hardly be classified as dusty ‘cocktail’, looked easy  thanks to innovative, pouf-y effect construction. It’s rare to see clothes that really do aim to be ready-to-wear, and simultaneously stand for something.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.