Prague’s Addresses II

In addition to my Prague addresses I discovered back in autumn (read about them here), here are three more places I found worth visiting in the Czech capital.

What makes Prague locals and well-informed tourists go to the rather sleepy Karlin district? One word: Eska. It’s a restaurant with a bakery which brings together the traditional and the modern – on the plate, and in its arty/industrial interior spread across two floors. It’s a spot from Ambiente (Prague’s leading culinary collective) that brings you food made of Czech ingredients with the daring touch of the head chef Martin Štangl. Here, you will enjoy breakfast, a lunch or an intimate evening meal made of several courses. When you leave, don’t miss the fire-baked bread, organic dairy, selected meats from Naše Maso and a take-away coffee at the Eska store.

Pernerova 49

Your culture time should be spent at the Veletržní Palác. At the time of its construction (completed in 1928), this was the largest building of its kind in the world and the first ‘Functionalist’ building in Prague. Today it serves the needs of the National Gallery. A unique collection of Czech and international contemporary art, it includes some well-known examples of French and European art, including major works by such names as Picasso, Toyen, Renoir, van Gogh, Klimt, Gauguin, Cezanne, Rodin and many more. Take your time to see all the four floors and the temporary exhibitions.

Kantýna is another address coming from under Ambiente’s wing. The concept is quite surprising – it’s a literal canteen, but aesthetically pleasing. With a butcher store in the front and a restaurant space in the back, this place is for true meat lovers (or even, maniacs). I wasn’t really impressed with the sausage I ordered, and I’m not a beer-loving type of person, but I guess there are people who enjoy this sort of culinary ‘adventure’. I came here for the interior!

Photographs by Edward Kanarecki.

Christmas in Prague

This Christmas, I went to Prague with my family, and it couldn’t be lovelier. Of course, there was some stress regarding the typical ‘Christmas conventions’ of staying at home and all… but then, Prague feels so, so at home. Those cobblestone streets, all the truly festive decorations, the panoramic views at the river (always filled with swans, whatever season it is!). And, to my own surprise, so many places are open throughout the holidays. New addresses, that will well add up to the spots I’ve written about back in October, are about to be posted here, hopefully before the New Year. For now, here are some moments from those few days.

Prague’s monumental, spikey architecture, some new season Prada at the Parizska street, and the delightful Christmas tree adorning the main square.

‘Grace: The Thirty Years of Fashion at Vogue’, signed by the one-and-only Grace Coddington, is what I got from Santa. I guess I was good this year… 

The iconic Czech Krtek, re-imagined in every possible way; the tram near Prague’s National Theatre; Art Deco-ish reliefs and ornaments near Jozefovo district; the crazy, colourful Czech glassware.

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Karlovy Vary

Karlovy Vary (or Carlsbad) is a charming town situated in western Bohemia, Czech Republic. It is named after Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Bohemia, who founded the city back in 1370. It;s historically famous for its hot springs (13 main springs, about 300 smaller springs, and the warm-water Teplá River) that are located both in the city, and on its green outskirts. No wonder why it’s the most visited spa town in Czech Republic – the treatments the city offers, based on the local waters, are here to relax and revitalise your body and soul. If you’re planning to visit Karlovy Vary in autumn, put fine dining and shopping aside – walk, walk and again walk in the surrounding forests! And see the local Orthodox church that’s located in the hilly neighborhood of huge, opulent villas. Needed a weekend escape? Here you go.

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Prague’s Addresses

Other than monastery libraries, synagogues and castles, Prague has some very exciting spots to eat and shop at. See my five favourite addresses from the Czech Republic’s capital city!

Make sure to book your table at Sansho – it’s ex-Nobu London chef Paul Day’s place. Locals will tell you Day cooks some of the best Asian cuisine in town, with dishes that take you to the taste heaven, from salmon sashimi and soft shell crap slider (Sansho’s cult signature) to ocra tofu sambal and a not-so-average curry offering. The minimal, cozy interior is a leap away from Prague’s widespread ‘over-the-top’ style of gourmet restaurants. A must, must visist!

Petrská 1170/25

Space has an eclectic selection of international brands, from Dries Van Noten to Golden Goose Deluxe Brand. I really loved the way the clothes hang on the racks – already styled and layered up.

Vězeňská 6

You just can’t go by Metamorphosis and not stop for a flower bouquet (consisting of my favourite dahlias or hydrangeas). Might be the best flower shop in the entire city.

Haštalská 796/3

Antik Cafe Dlouhý Příběh is a multi-purpose spot. At the entrance you can buy some home-made jams and cured meat. In the eating space, try out the typically Czech cuisine. The interior is purely vintage, as every furniture is hand-picked from a flea market. Oh, and you can buy the lamp you fancy – from the most kitsch to the most Communist-like.

Dlouhá 37

Ok, that’s something you can expect from me, wherever I am. Céline, still with the accent. Last Phoebe Philo pieces are still here (but few sizes left), just as the pre-Hedi autumn-winter 2018 collection. Loved the concrete staircase. Run for that silk, over-sized shirt with fruit print!

Pařížská 97/15

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.