It’s a Ball. Richard Quinn AW19

Since the Queen herself took a seat front row at Richard Quinn’s show exactly a year ago, the designer’s show is a must-see show in London, that’s for sure. While the majority of the looks were all about Quinn’s signature, bold floral prints, the first looks were coats in tartan plaid and houndstooth – nothing more British than that. But then, when you go through the next looks, you might realise they don’t differ strongly from this what we’ve seen in the last seasons from Richard. What seemed to be a novelty was black latex, used for long gloves and tights that peaked from underneath the over-sized ball dresses and equally voluminous lady-like coats. I thought it looked restricting and uncomfortable on the models, through. Couture touches are Quinn’s specialty: black tulle went with gorgeously embroidered dresses and the feathered ‘hoods’ that closed the show were the ultimate highlights. Still, hope to see the designer slightly change his repertoire next season, as he gets repetitive.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Time for Fantasy. JW Anderson AW19

Jonathan Anderson’s autumn-winter 2019 collection was a play with construction. From the architectural grey coats and statuesque shoulder pads to fluid-like drapes and airy, over-sized frocks, this was a JW Anderson line-up, where you can actually turn to a number of completely different things. Also, as it turned out, Anderson wanted to go ‘fashion’ this season, in this today rare, uplifting, statement-making manner. “The idea of a woman walking on clouds – this idea of fantasy and imagination in fashion,” he backstage. “I mean, that’s why we do it.” While the last few shows he presented for women at his namesake brand felt overly sophisticated, this one was a like a much-needed, carefree moment. Not ridiculous or pretentious, but joyous and with a bit of distance.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Kinky Things. Christopher Kane AW19

Christopher Kane loves the topic of sex in fashion. If you think of some of his previous seasons’ sex-related hits – like the lace, C-string details or the illustrations from ‘Joy of Sex’ book placed all over the dresses – it’s clear that Kane understands sexuality quite differently than majority of other designers. It’s nothing shallow or obvious, that’s for sure. The autumn-winter 2019 collection was about kinky fetishes, of all sorts. Latex, chainmail elements, leather, lace, even fantasies on food and balloons (conveyed in cheeky prints), were intriguingly incorporated into brilliant garments, like a lady-like coat or an evening gown. The fluid-filled plastic details, that appeared on Kane’s runway a couple of years ago, had something slinky about them, but they were far from tacky. However, if you’re not crazy for kink, feel free to pull the theme apart, and here we are with a collection filled with gorgeous daywear (see the cardigans, knee-length skirts and shirting) and equally good eveningwear. But then… why not go a bit down the risky path?

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Too Much Content. Burberry AW19

Riccardo Tisci’s second collection for Burberry left me with the same impression I had after his debut. Too much of content. Again, we’ve got an exhausting line-up of more than 100 looks and some sort of separated themes that relate to British culture. Guests sat in two spaces: one very formal with a 90s rave soundtrack, the other an urban jungle set to the sounds of classical piano. The collection was a matching game of contrasts between street and elegance. While Tisci wants to get as democratic and inclusive with his fashion as possible, it seems like the huge scope of Britishness is just too much for one collection. The second part of the collection, the formal one, was the strongest: we’ve had sharp tailoring, gorgeous, distinctly Burberry trench coats, refined eveningwear. The oyster print was properly posh, while the colour palette – Burb beige and pistachio – looked insanely good. Stella Tennant in a camel total look and a matching beanie was just it. The first part of the collection, the one that’s targeted for younger audience, was like a deja vu from Riccardo’s later Givenchy years, when he went full throttle with printed T-shirts and sweatshirts. Yes, those were bestsellers, but… we’re in 2019. That mould of tartan plaid, Burberry checks, puffers and logos wasn’t neither clubbing fashion, punk or anything close to that. Rather, millennials-minded mumble jumble of references.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.