Too Much Content. Burberry AW19

Riccardo Tisci’s second collection for Burberry left me with the same impression I had after his debut. Too much of content. Again, we’ve got an exhausting line-up of more than 100 looks and some sort of separated themes that relate to British culture. Guests sat in two spaces: one very formal with a 90s rave soundtrack, the other an urban jungle set to the sounds of classical piano. The collection was a matching game of contrasts between street and elegance. While Tisci wants to get as democratic and inclusive with his fashion as possible, it seems like the huge scope of Britishness is just too much for one collection. The second part of the collection, the formal one, was the strongest: we’ve had sharp tailoring, gorgeous, distinctly Burberry trench coats, refined eveningwear. The oyster print was properly posh, while the colour palette – Burb beige and pistachio – looked insanely good. Stella Tennant in a camel total look and a matching beanie was just it. The first part of the collection, the one that’s targeted for younger audience, was like a deja vu from Riccardo’s later Givenchy years, when he went full throttle with printed T-shirts and sweatshirts. Yes, those were bestsellers, but… we’re in 2019. That mould of tartan plaid, Burberry checks, puffers and logos wasn’t neither clubbing fashion, punk or anything close to that. Rather, millennials-minded mumble jumble of references.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Woman for Women. Simone Rocha AW19

Talented women with their distinct style rule in London. There’s Marta Jakubowski and Molly Goddard. There’s Victoria Beckham and Mary Katrantzou. And there’s Simone Rocha, whose autumn-winter 2019 was one of the very best collections I’ve seen this season. Rocha designs for women – and women love her. Seeing her runway graced by women of different ages, colour and body types was a female power moment, yes, but also an ode to the brand’s clients who trust Simone every season. Chloë Sevigny, Tess McMillan, Kristen Owen, Lily Cole, Sara Grace Wallerstedt, Ugbad Abdi… whether models or not, runway veterans or bold newcomers, all those faces are amazing individuals and characters. And, also, it’s an ultimate proof that full-skirted dresses and coats aren’t only meant for 20-somethings, just like organza see-throughs, bras worn over trench coats and opulent headbands. The collection was a study of female eroticism, a debate between being the object of desire and owning it. As the designer put it in her own words, “it was a about intimacy and privacy, security and insecurity”. Rocha looked at Michael Powell’s disturbing films (like ‘Peeping Tom’, the voyeuristic horror), but also returned to her long-time inspiration – Louise Bourgeois. The artist investigates the subject of sex and tenderness in her works, which as well often takes a darker turn. “I found her series of weavings which she’d made with fabric from her own clothes particularly beautiful,” Simone said. The spiderweb embroideries and prints Rocha used for puffball coats and dresses were made in collaboration with the Louise Bourgeois Foundation – could you wish for a more heartwarming artist appreciation moment? Still, while the themes behind the collection might be not exactly joyous and lightweight, the models – we see you, Chloë – were all smiley and visibly proud to be walking that outstanding show.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki, feauturing a painting by Genieve Figgis. 

Dressed for The Storm. Molly Goddard AW19

You might know Molly Goddard for her voluminous tulle dresses, but it would be a mistake to say that her brand is nothing more than that. Goddard’s autumn-winter 2019 was one of her best, as it didn’t only demonstrate how she can expand her style, but also, it showed her signature in a new context. “Dressed for the storm” is how the designer describe the look of the season. If knitted balaclavas, utilitarian accessories and weatherproof knee-high boots didn’t exactly ring a bell, then the wind machines installed on the runway were a quite straightforward metaphor. The way Molly’s XXL tulles in green and pink drifted in the abrupt air was so, so beautiful, simply speaking. Rhombus patterned knits, easy-looking frocks and laid-back tailoring were as well something new, a nod to the English countryside style (I’m thinking of Stella Tennant and Isabella Cowdor’s style seen in their Holland & Holland reinvention). Goddard’s shows are always a delight, whether it’s a kitchen after-party, Mediterranean market or an imaginary storm.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki feauturing a painting by Genieve Figgis. 

It’s Fashion. Matty Bovan AW19

London fashion week has fashion, written with a capital letter. Basically it’s something New York fashion week rarely has anything to do with (even though this season wasn’t that bad, as we had bold Tomo Koizumi and Area). But back to London. Matty Bovan is the person who seems to be out of the serious, commercial fashion cycle. That’s why everybody loves him, from Love Magazine’s Katie Grand to Coach’s Stuart Vevers, who collaborates with Bovan on accessories. Matty’s autumn-winter 2019 collection was a fabulous madhouse. The garments felt like three-dimensional collages, even like assamblage art. The colourful knits were beautifully destructed, while the closing gowns were layered and layered with patches, tassels, leftover fabrics and who knows what else. It’s fun, bad in a good away, a middle finger to the established system of what a ready-to-wear collection should look (and be) like. It’s good to know somebody does it. It’s a very rare thing nowadays – sadly.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.