Vibrant. Erdem Resort 2020

Erdem’s resort 2020 lookbook was a collaboration with Ibrahim Kamara, a London-based stylist, who’s best pals with Madonna. They worked together with the photographer Sam Rock to create the sense of vibrance, energy and motion in the poses of the girls as they work their typically Erdem floral prints, billowy sleeve and headwraps. There’s more: over-sized bows, printed tights to match dresses, and polka dots (lately favoured by previosly mentioned Madonna, who wears the ones from Erdem while promoting Madame X). What stands out most? The ethereal, yellow gown, all embellished with floral motifs. Just beautiful.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Grown Up Glam Rock. Hillier Bartley AW19

What can you expect from Hillier Bartley for autumn-winter 2019? Stunning tailoring that’s Savile Row quality, but with a twist (think double-breasted houndstooth suit punked up with a zipper across the waist and matching pants in origami pleat). A smart clash of fashion references, from Kansai Yamamoto (look at the prints inspired with his work) to the bold New Romantics’ movement from 70s London. And brilliant eveningwear that spans from a gorgeous line-up of tailoring to a V-neck maxi-lenght gown in red (worn over a purple turtleneck – love this colour palette). Luella Bartley and Katie Hillier keep the vision of their brand consistent, yet at the same exciting. While Luella works closely with the clothes, Katie does the accessories. Look at the trapeze-shaped “cassette” bags – they look elegant, but sharp, grown-up, but glam. Just like the collection itself.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

It’s a Ball. Richard Quinn AW19

Since the Queen herself took a seat front row at Richard Quinn’s show exactly a year ago, the designer’s show is a must-see show in London, that’s for sure. While the majority of the looks were all about Quinn’s signature, bold floral prints, the first looks were coats in tartan plaid and houndstooth – nothing more British than that. But then, when you go through the next looks, you might realise they don’t differ strongly from this what we’ve seen in the last seasons from Richard. What seemed to be a novelty was black latex, used for long gloves and tights that peaked from underneath the over-sized ball dresses and equally voluminous lady-like coats. I thought it looked restricting and uncomfortable on the models, through. Couture touches are Quinn’s specialty: black tulle went with gorgeously embroidered dresses and the feathered ‘hoods’ that closed the show were the ultimate highlights. Still, hope to see the designer slightly change his repertoire next season, as he gets repetitive.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Time for Fantasy. JW Anderson AW19

Jonathan Anderson’s autumn-winter 2019 collection was a play with construction. From the architectural grey coats and statuesque shoulder pads to fluid-like drapes and airy, over-sized frocks, this was a JW Anderson line-up, where you can actually turn to a number of completely different things. Also, as it turned out, Anderson wanted to go ‘fashion’ this season, in this today rare, uplifting, statement-making manner. “The idea of a woman walking on clouds – this idea of fantasy and imagination in fashion,” he backstage. “I mean, that’s why we do it.” While the last few shows he presented for women at his namesake brand felt overly sophisticated, this one was a like a much-needed, carefree moment. Not ridiculous or pretentious, but joyous and with a bit of distance.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.