A Gift. Tomo Koizumi SS20

New York fashion week is in full swing. Tomo Koizumi, Marc Jacobs and Katie Grand’s protégé, had Ariel Nicholson do a theatrical performance in his new season ruffled Japanese polyester organza creations at Marc’s Madison Avenue flagship. The Japanese designer, who already amazed everyone with his work last season, explained his spring-summer 2020 process as the following: “I tried to make more 3D patterns with ruffles – it’s kind of like a boxy shape, because I wanted to make something like a gift box.” When he was sketching the designs for the garments, the designer drew inspiration from his own culture – using Lolita fashion as a primary reference, he also crafted the shapes of the dresses based on Japanese robotic cartoons, which he grew up watching. The looks – if you can even call them like this – really had something of gift wrapping, bold and knowing no borders of ‘too excessive’. Tomo doesn’t want to be commercial, and his costumes are for the most daring ones. You can hate it or love it, but this sort or joyous non-chalance is not only growingly rare in New York, but across all the fashion capitals.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Organza Fantasy. Tomo Koizumi AW19

When you become a Marc Jacobs protegé, are allowed to present your collection in his Madison Avenue store, get Katie Grand as a stylist, Pat McGrath for the make-up, and Gwendoline Christie, Karen Elson, Rowan Blanchard and Bella Hadid walk your debut show, be sure you will be on everybody’s lips for the rest of New York fashion week. But, all this very helpful support is just the cherry on the cake, because Tomo Koizumi‘s fashion is a star in itself. Although I would be cautious with calling Koizumi’s autumn-winter 2019 a fantasy of Pierpaolo Piccioli’s Valentino heights, this outing really was a fantasy that is just what New York needs. In the crowd of post-Philo aesthetic and too-edgy styling, Tomo’s polyester organza pieces, kept in all the shades of rainbow, are a true fairy-tale. Capes, ball-skirts, gowns of different lengths – all looking like a candy-sweet armour. Where will this major debut take Koizumi and his distinct style? Time will show. But it’s worth mentioning that Jacobs should be praised for helping out a new talent with his great platform. Hope to see more of initiatives like this in the upcoming seasons.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.