Hot & Short. Tom Ford AW21

Tom Ford keeps it hot and mostly short. “The slight deconstruction of luxurious pieces is something that I feel will be a legacy of the pandemic for a few seasons to come,” he wrote in the press notes. Meaning, Zoom-perfect tops in lace and net were paired with bleached jeans, and dresses took their cues either from stretchy activewear or lingerie. Ford’s new hot pants, worn with turtleneck sweaters and puffer or aviator jackets bring that kind of sultry secutiveness he delivered in his Gucci days. Ford said the oversized jackets and underwear combos sprung from a lingerie ad he remembers from his youth. “It was also a very Edie Sedgwick thing to do,” he added. Another legacy of the pandemic he foresees will be the return of sexy. Meanwhile, the autumn-winter 2021 men’s look book includes three loungewear outfits that combine softly structured robes, button-front shirts, and elastic-waistband pants stitched with Ford’s logo (one thing I wish wasn’t there…). This is a distinctly Tom Ford collection – you want to be that girl or guy.

“Live” collage by Edward Kanarecki.

The Ultimate Show. Tom Ford SS11

I’m currently reading André Leon Talley’s phenomenal “The Chiffon Trenches: A Memoir“, and I came across his account of Tom Ford‘s first runway collection coming from his own, name-sake label. The author recalled the event in the most ethereal way. And as it happened about ten years ago (and this is the reason why it’s the first proper post of 2021!), I was surprised I didn’t really have any image in my mind from that spectacular line-up, until Talley noted the whole event was kept mostly in a secret, and the only photographer allowed was Terry Richardson. Thankfully, some photos and this delightful video coverage are present on the web. So, spring-summer 2011 was Ford’s first big come-back to runway after his days at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent. At the beginning of September, 2010, under the cloak of secrecy, he hosted an intimate cocktail party-slah-fashion-show at his menswear store on Madison Avenue. Luminary friends such as Julianne Moore, Lisa Eisner, Rita Wilson, Marisa Berenson, Daphne Guinness and Lou Doillon all sashayed down the runway, as did Ford model favorites Daria Werbowy, Liya Kebede (who Ford made a supermodel), Amber Valletta and the late Stella Tennant. Somehow, he even got Beyoncé to shimmy down the runway in a body-clinging, sparkle-laden gown. “Beyoncé in real life is actually quite quiet and very sweet,” Ford told Harper’s Bazaar back in the day. “But she can really turn it on.” Ford controlled the entire presentation, as in the days of intimate salon presentations, right down to the music volume, introducing every girl by name and describing her outfit in detail. For added amusement, he catcalled a few of them, teased Eisner for walking too quickly, told model Joan Smalls she might have turned him straight, and then told Beyoncé she definitely did. While many thought the show was a flashback to Parisian couture shows, Ford said the impetus for the show’s format was much more curious and much more camp. “I was on the train from London to Paris, and all of a sudden it just popped into my head: I’m going to do the Don Loper fashion show from ‘I Love Lucy’,” Ford explained. That particular episode, shot in Los Angeles with real Hollywood wives (Dean Martin’s and William Holden’s among them), is a classic: Lucy wants a covetable Don Loper dress she can’t afford. But lo and behold, Loper is doing a fashion show (which he narrates himself) and asks Lucy to model. She sits by the pool too long in hopes of achieving a perfect California bronze but ends up badly sunburned, “and she gets a tweed outfit and she can barely walk. It’s all very cute and everyone claps,” explains Ford. Of course, his 2010 version was more sexy than cute, and instead of claps he got a standing ovation. The casting was intentional. “I chose these models because I knew them. I designed these things thinking of them,” he explains. Following the Oscars, he thrust himself into designing the collection, using a mental list of about 30 women he would love to dress: “women I find inspirational and who are archetypes,” Ford says. “My collection each season should have something that a woman in her 60s, who is still stylish and lived through the Charlie era, could wear, so Lauren Hutton gets that look. There’s something someone of Rachel Feinstein’s size should wear and something for someone who is extravagant and shops at a bunch of vintage stores, like Lisa Eisner, should wear.” The incredible, magnetic Tom Ford.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

The Gift Guide For Her – Cozy & Chic

This year, I’ve decided to create dream gift guides that might make it easier for you to go (and filter) through the festive season. Get ready for a selection of beautiful items that will spark joy and last for years. The ones that will certainly please one’s senses and deliver heavenly feelings. Treat your loved ones and yourself! Here’s the curated edit of the most covetable delights, which are both cozy and chic!

Covered Up. What’s better than cashmere? To be honest… nothing compares. Cashmere In Love‘s balaclavas are crafted from a super soft glitter infused Mongolian wool cashmere blend, and combine elegance and retro spirit – with a hint of rebellion. Fold it into a beanie or pull it back to use as a neck warmer.

“Megeve” balaclava by Cashmere In Love

Precious & Timeless. Combine durable utility with ravishing exquisiteness.

Marine Serre chain-bag water bottle, Chloé “Franne” ribbed wool and leather boots, Simone Rocha flower drop crystal earrings & Miu Miu pink wool cardigan

Elevate Your Space! A perfect gift for a person that loves to update their surroundings. Or just give this present to your lounge-y living-room.

The Elder Statesman cashmere cushion

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NET-A-PORTER Limited

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Glamorous Lounge-Wear. Especially, if its scented with pêche de vigne combined with Sicilian blood orange, davana oil with infused rum and cognac, Indonesian patchouli, sandalwood, labdanum and vanilla. Or simply: Tom Ford‘s magnificent Bitter Peach.

Tom Ford “Bitter Peach” fragrance, Victor Glemaud purple and red knitted tank top, Saint Laurent round earrings & Cashmere in Love knitted cashmere pants

Soft Minimalism. If you’re in search for a timeless, elegant gift, look no further – Lemaire is the perfect label. I mean, those boots! They are b-e-a-u-t-i-f-u-l!

Lemaire printed boots made in collaboration with Martin Ramirez & Lemaire silver long drop earrings

Comfort Zone. 2020 wasn’t easy, we all know that. Take some time for a rest. Comfort for your skin, for your feet, for your senses…

Lauren Manoogian hand-knit scarf, Louise Madzia “Body” plant pot, Chloé chain necklace, Augustinus Bader “The Face Oil” & Bottega Veneta quilted sneakers

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NET-A-PORTER Limited

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Helmut Newton is always a good idea.

Helmut Newton “SUMO” 20th Anniversary Edition Book by Taschen & Wolford x Helmut Newton Edition t-shirt

Tactile Statement Pieces. Pick from Julia Heuer‘s fantastic pleats or Lauren Manoogian‘s fleecy alpaca slippers, and you’ve got the gift that keeps on giving each season, at any occasion.

Julia Heuer Multicolor cardigan, Julia Heuer trousersLauren Manoogian alpaca slippers & Bottega Veneta sculptural clutch bag

Knitwear. The softest and fleeciest of them all? A great knit is an unforgettable present, which will serve for years and years and years to come.

Brunello Cucinelli abstract knitted jumper, Lauren Manoogian beige cardiganLauren Manoogian alpaca dress & The Elder Statesman tie-dyed cashmere hoodie

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TASCHEN

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Winter Classics.

Chloé argyle wool and cashmere-blend knit, Louise Madzia ceramic plate, Diptyque “Tubereuse” candle& Cashmere in Love hoodie

Nocturnal Chic. Eveningwear that will easily jump to bold, everyday wardrobe? Dries Van Noten never dissapoints, and his gorgeous autumn-winter 2020 is the definition of the word ‘festive’.

Dries Van Noten sequined chiffon shirt, Dries Van Noten feather trimmed sequin chiffon skirt & Dries Van Noten quilted velvet skirt

More festive gift guides are coming soon!

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NET-A-PORTER Limited

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All collages by Edward Kanarecki.