Dressed for The Storm. Molly Goddard AW19

You might know Molly Goddard for her voluminous tulle dresses, but it would be a mistake to say that her brand is nothing more than that. Goddard’s autumn-winter 2019 was one of her best, as it didn’t only demonstrate how she can expand her style, but also, it showed her signature in a new context. “Dressed for the storm” is how the designer describe the look of the season. If knitted balaclavas, utilitarian accessories and weatherproof knee-high boots didn’t exactly ring a bell, then the wind machines installed on the runway were a quite straightforward metaphor. The way Molly’s XXL tulles in green and pink drifted in the abrupt air was so, so beautiful, simply speaking. Rhombus patterned knits, easy-looking frocks and laid-back tailoring were as well something new, a nod to the English countryside style (I’m thinking of Stella Tennant and Isabella Cowdor’s style seen in their Holland & Holland reinvention). Goddard’s shows are always a delight, whether it’s a kitchen after-party, Mediterranean market or an imaginary storm.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki feauturing a painting by Genieve Figgis. 

Molly Goddard & Her Charm

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It’s impossible not to fall in love with Molly Goddard‘s charming, carefree and one-of-a-kind designs. During the last London Fashion Week, I had an impression that it was Molly’s show that really stood out the most. I wrote about the slight Lady Bird feeling I had throughout the autumn-winter 2018 outing. And now, when I’m looking back at this tulle-loving and gingham-patterned collection, so much optimism comes up to my mind. It’s like Kylie Minogue’s ecstatic Impossible Princess album from 1997 – loud, powerful, happy. Also, everyone should admit that Goddard’s impact across the industry (and other designers’ moodboards…) is very, very noticeable. Just look at Off-White and Stella McCartney this season – I see you, copycats. I doubt they would cherish tulle that much if Molly didn’t make it a statement again.

If you’re about to invest in a piece to love this spring, see the grey Robyn dressruched sleeve sheer top in pink and the delightful August skirt.

 

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Lady Bird. Molly Goddard AW18

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While looking at Molly Goddard’s autumn-winter 2018 collection, I was just impressed with the way this young designer does everything so effortlessly, with so much joy. And, simultaneously, with success. Although Goddard usually goes for party-themed venues, this season the set was an industrial kitchen, probably inspired with those in hotels. Models stopped for a bottle of wine, casually, or a chat. Was it an unofficial after-party scene we all witness from time to time? “It’s where I always end up at a party,” the designer said. “Usually that’s the best part of the night.” Few seasons ago, Molly stormed the London fashion week with her signature, over-sized tulle dresses and a cool, ‘what a girl likes’ mood. Right now, the designer moves towards new territories of 90s crop-tops and gingham, so that she doesn’t feel trapped in a garment she is known for making so well in her studio. “It gets very boring to be confined to the pretty bracket,” she said. “Being girlie is fine, but I think that girlie is often misinterpreted as wishy-washy or prim. I’m the opposite of prim.

Still, it was the ‘dress’ part of the show that really got everyone talking. The last looks, kept in happy shades of pink and orange, somehow reminded me of Christina from Lady Bird – the main character in Greta Gerwig’s debutant film, starring the phenomenal Saoirse Ronan. Just like Lady Bird, the Molly Goddard girl is a beautiful soul in the middle of a difficult world. Still, she’s got balls to go against the flow. Was that an unintentional tribute to all the Lady Birds out there?

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Danish Girl. Cecilie Bahnsen AW18

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LVMH Prize finalist Cecilie Bahnsen draws on the minimalist aesthetic of her Danish heritage for her eponymous, Copenhagen-based label. The Royal College of Art graduate’s selection of ethereal gowns, elegant dresses and sophisticated separates are a showcase of girlie silhouettes with a sculptural edge. Each piece is handmade with phenomenally soft, fluffy fabrics and finished with couture-like details. For autumn-winter 2018, especially look out for tulle dresses in pastel pink and those cute, quilted skirts. Copenhagen fashion week is a great source of fresh designers with Scandinavian sensibility, and this time around, it’s Cecilie that caught everyone’s eye. Also, feel free to fall in love with this velvet goodie and one of these collars coming from Bahnsen.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.