Positive. Marni Pre-Fall 2019

There’s always something very joyous and positive about Francesco Risso‘s approach to designing collections for Marni. For pre-fall 2019, which starts to hit the stores, he crashed prints and textures without much caution, creating a beautifully chaotic wardrobe for an equally unique personality. The utilitarian elegance of uniforms was translated into elongated dusters, sleek car coats and double-breasted peacoats in thick fabrics like felted and pressed bouclé, padded satin, polished leather, shearlings and ponyskins. Psychedelic brocades and Lurex jacquards were used in one blouse, while Inuit-inspired prints were mixed together in opera coats and skirts with half-plissé side panels. The recurring use of natural materials is a nod to the no-waste, responsible approach the designer emphasizes. I think Marni, with Risso’s folksy aesthic, can take a step forward and start making its collections from upcycled materials, too. And incorporate traditional artisans’ work into each collection. This would be a brilliant example for other Italian brands to follow.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Time Travel. Louis Vuitton Resort 2020

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Nicolas Ghesqière seems to be not over his love for the past decades. Louis Vuitton‘s resort 2020, which was presented at the historic TWA Flight Center in New York (the fantastic space, renovated for years and soon to be open as a hotel, was designed by Eero Saarinenback  in 1962), was all about the past: 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s, combined with Elizabethan NYC’s art deco heritage. Which again reminds us that fashion, unfortunately, has problems with finding inspiration anywhere else. But back to the collection. Stewardess dresses and Chrysler-Building-inspired bags; 1980’s big sleeves and combat boots of the 1990s; Catwoman skullcaps and pantsuits of Wall Street. Highlight? Marte Mei van Haaster’s strass-lined caped crop-top. But in general, not a fan of this collection.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Virginie Viard. Chanel Resort 2020

While the MET Gala stole the spotlight from the last few days, it would be great pity to forget about Chanel‘s resort 2020 collection, the first solely designed under Virginie Viard‘s direction. As Karl Lagerfeld would say, the beat goes on, and the brand is moving on after the death of its visionary designer. But I think it’s in good hands – Viard was the closest person to Karl, and understands the brand like no one else. Changes from the Lagerfeld repertoire were subtle, but meaningful. First, the venue. Travel was very much on Virginie’s mind, so Grand Palais was temporarily changed into an elegant train station, with a Belle Epoque café, potted palms and so on. Still, the setting wasn’t as show-stopping as the ones Karl did – which suggests that Viard wants to bring the focus on the clothes. Second, the clothes. They felt… real. A trench coat. Easy-in-approach cardigans with Chanel chains and voluminous pants Coco Chanel would love to wear herself. Jackie-Kennedy-inspired vacation looks. Even the eveningwear seemed to be more approachable. This was a 24/7 wardrobe fit not for a risk-taker, but a self-aware woman with big money in her wallet. Well, that’s Chanel. And Viard delivered this. Let’s see what she bring to the table in in near future.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.