Summer Escape. Salvatore Ferragamo SS20

Presented in the beautiful grounds of Rotonda della Besana in Milan, Paul Andrew‘s spring-summer 2020 collection for Salvatore Ferragamo saw timelessly wearable pieces in tonal colour-block pastels, forest greens, piercing blues and burnt oranges. It was Andrew’s vision of a summer escape wardrobe, especially perfect for Italy. The best takeaways from the collection? Kirsten Owen wearing a hooded kaftan and Małgosia Bela appearing twice, in two different over-sized, masculine blazers. How to style them? Well, say bye to biking shorts (hated you anyway) and say hello to over-sized, belted pantalons.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Sustainability At Its Best. Marni SS20

While one would think that the entire fashion industry wouldn’t really acknowledge the climate strike that happened across the world yesterday, it’s a relief to know there’s one designer who really cares. It’s Marni‘s Francesco Risso. Not only was the show’s setting considered in a sustainable way – guests sat on recompressed-cardboard benches under a recycled plastic jungle (made of reclaimed waste) – but also the new season clothes had a lot to do with this important topic. In his collection, Risso used upcycled textiles, organic cottons, and “recuperated” leathers in the most impressive ways. Balloon-smock tops paired with flared skirts, naive prints hand-painted by Francesco’s team, 1950s couture-inspired silhouettes that delivered a touch of eccentric elegance, chunky knits which hung asymmetrically. I also loved the fact that many of the pieces were aprons (that created an illusion of dresses) and were paired with full skirts. A novelty to try out next summer. All this was kept in a bold colour palette of orange, magenta and green, and was topped by Julien d’Ys’ incredible hair-styles that used dried flowers. Risso wanted to create a “joyous protestan homage to nature and our sense of humanity”, and he succeeded. It’s truly reassuring to see a major Italian brand putting sustainability as its priority. And makes it look so good!

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Camp Picasso. Moschino SS20

I still can’t believe that I’m writing about Jeremy Scott‘s Moschino. But his camp-y, silly, fun spring-summer 2020 collection just can’t be ignored. It was just as good as Franco Moscino’s Moschino. In a spectacle of art in motion, Scott’s line-up saw Pablo Picasso’s paintings reimagined as structured cocktail dresses. The designer drew on the iconography of the artist, transforming his best known motifs into theatrical, exaggerated garments – a dress adorned with a Cubist guitar, blouses with big shoulders that were flattened into two dimensions – that really, really amaze. Models emerged through a carved gilt frame, and even wore a wide, boxy dress version, its edges embroidered to three dimensions with gold thread and filled with a canvas of a Cubist nude that covered the model’s body. “Artists inspire the world” – this was Jeremy’s thought behind the collection. They really do.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Odd Sensuality. Bottega Veneta SS20

Daniel Lee‘s second collection at Bottega Veneta was the most anticipated moment of Milan fashion week. In fact, it’s the second collection that is the hardest: how to keep all the attention you had at the very beginning, excite everyone, and simultaneously be consistent? After his extremely promising debut and the global craze caused by the label’s pouches (they are a constant sold-outer on nearly each site) and so-fugly-it’s-good footwear, Daniel’s spring-summer 2020 was unexpectedly laid-back. Since all the Philophiles have turned into New Bottega fans, and they seem super assertive and passionate about it, it’s life-threatening to even say that I’m not really a fan of this collection. My first thought was that it’s the lazier version of autumn-winter 2019 line-up: same beaded dresses but in new colours, super over-sized coats, knitted dresses with sharp, at a first glance odd in positioning skin-baring details (as in case of men’s sweaters), leather bermuda shorts. The newest addition – the monkey printed silks – felt completely random. I might even say that I liked menswear more than womenswear: those blazers are to die for, not speaking of the black trench coat on James Turtlington (yes, this Turtlington). Bottega Veneta’s accessories thrive in being hot. Exaggerated weavings on the sandals are new take on the house’s intreciatto; the pouch clutch came in leather crotchet; the shoulder bags are bigger than ever. Still, the ready-to-wear missed the mark for me, as for the first impression. Maybe I’m saying that right now and I will change my mind when I see the clothes in stores.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.