Elongated and Lean. Jil Sander Resort 2020

What Lucie and Luke Meier do at Jil Sander is so, so beautifully balanced and considered. Their resort 2020 look-book is one of their best collections to date, and they prove their comprehension of the brand’s heritage in every aspect, from impeccable tailioring to feminimine-slash-minimalist day-wear. “The silhouette is very elongated, very lean,” one of the designers mentioned to the press. “It follows the body line, but then it breaks with a playful gesture, like tying something around the waist, be it a belt, a sweater, or a leather waist bag. Trying to convey a sense of lightness and movement.” Also, I really love the element of nature that reappears in Meier’s collection season-to-season. Raffia-crocheted skirt and straw basket bags are one way to approach plastic-free, eco-friendly fashion. Tie-dye Shibori techniques, used as decorative elements on over-sized cotton shirtdresses, blouses and skirst, are artisan handworks that need no chemicals in production. Big yes to everything this collection delivers.

Collages by Edward Kanarecki.

Positive. Marni Pre-Fall 2019

There’s always something very joyous and positive about Francesco Risso‘s approach to designing collections for Marni. For pre-fall 2019, which starts to hit the stores, he crashed prints and textures without much caution, creating a beautifully chaotic wardrobe for an equally unique personality. The utilitarian elegance of uniforms was translated into elongated dusters, sleek car coats and double-breasted peacoats in thick fabrics like felted and pressed bouclé, padded satin, polished leather, shearlings and ponyskins. Psychedelic brocades and Lurex jacquards were used in one blouse, while Inuit-inspired prints were mixed together in opera coats and skirts with half-plissé side panels. The recurring use of natural materials is a nod to the no-waste, responsible approach the designer emphasizes. I think Marni, with Risso’s folksy aesthic, can take a step forward and start making its collections from upcycled materials, too. And incorporate traditional artisans’ work into each collection. This would be a brilliant example for other Italian brands to follow.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Time Travel. Louis Vuitton Resort 2020

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Nicolas Ghesqière seems to be not over his love for the past decades. Louis Vuitton‘s resort 2020, which was presented at the historic TWA Flight Center in New York (the fantastic space, renovated for years and soon to be open as a hotel, was designed by Eero Saarinenback  in 1962), was all about the past: 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s, combined with Elizabethan NYC’s art deco heritage. Which again reminds us that fashion, unfortunately, has problems with finding inspiration anywhere else. But back to the collection. Stewardess dresses and Chrysler-Building-inspired bags; 1980’s big sleeves and combat boots of the 1990s; Catwoman skullcaps and pantsuits of Wall Street. Highlight? Marte Mei van Haaster’s strass-lined caped crop-top. But in general, not a fan of this collection.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.