It’s A Smash. Lacoste AW19

Lacoste is a tricky brand. Its roots are in tennis, while the green crocodile logo is often perceived as dismissingly as Tommy Hilfiger’s or Calvin Klein’s. But Louise Trotter (former designer at Joseph) made me fall in love with her vision of the brand, completely. Her debut was a smash, so a winner strike according to tennis jargon. Her love for minimalist, clean lines and athleisure are true to her style, so it wasn’t a surprise her aesthetic goes so well with Lacoste’s context. The autumn-winter 2019 show was all about tennis clothes, but transformed into desirable, high fashion. Polo necks in ribbed knit; chunky vests were worn over maxi-lenght, breezy dresses covered with the crocodile print; trackpants came in over-sized, slouchy jersey; zipped sweatshirts were kept in bold colours. The opening looks, featuring the chicest shade of beige, informed Trotter’s stance on her Lacoste: expect elevated daywear with a sporty spin. Big love.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Not Demanding. Miu Miu AW19

Miuccia Prada‘s latest Miu Miu collection didn’t really touch my heart this season. It maybe had to reflect today’s youth, ready to face the world, but to me it felt like a show done ‘last minute’ (I know it wasn’t, though). Bit of camo print there, florals here. Baby doll dresses and trekking boots aren’t a surprise anymore. The long cape-coats? Didn’t buy them, either. The collection had to feel spontaneous in a way, maybe grunge-y even, but there’s a difference between ‘cool eclecticism’ and ‘messy’. But if you put the clothes out of the show’s styling, you can see few great pieces. We’re all exhausted sometimes, and Miuccia definitely felt like it’s good moment for a non-demanding, commercial collection. That was Miu Miu’s primal idea, after all.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Farewell, Karl. Chanel AW19

Chalet Camelia. Winter wonderland. Houndstooth coats and tweed hats. Luxe knits and eternal CC logo. Snowball skirts and Choupette fluffiness. Penelope Cruz, Cara Delevigne, Adesuwa, Maria Carla Boscono, Mica Arganaraz, Kaia Gerber, Anna Ewers, Adut Akech and the Chanel girls. Thousand of tears dropped, from Michel Gaubert’s minute of silence to the model’s finale walk (some couldn’t hold the tears). But you surely know all this.

I doubt Karl Lagerfeld would want his last show to be a fussy, overemotional event. His last show was exactly how he planned it to be: as if it was his next collection for Chanel, another fantasy. “Oh! It’s like walking in a painting!” Farewell to the visionnaire, the most prolific, joyous, assertive and energetic designer the world has known, whether you agree with this or not. But those are facts. What will next seasons look and feel like without him? I’ve got no idea. It seemed like he was always there. On the show’s invitation there was Lagerfeld’s last illustration, captioned: “the beat goes on!“. He wanted it to go on, so let’s all look forward to Virgine Viard’s future for Chanel.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Suspiria. Undercover AW19

When I saw Undercover‘s autumn-winter 2019 collection, I was literally like: “OMG. It’s an ode to Suspiria. OMG!”. Yes. Jun Takahashi really did a collection that’s in majority all about Luca Guadagnino’s remake of Dario Argento’s cult horror, Suspiria. First, you’ve got to know I’m a mega-fan of Luca and all his films. But his Suspiria transported me to a completely different world. So I was really impressed that somebody in fashion finally went crazy for this film and did a proper collection based on it. The mood of 1970’s, Cold War-era Berlin and a world-renowned dance company controlled by powerful, elusive, sadomasochistic witches… it’s such a good source of inspiration. Not only the collection’s colour palette was completely inspired with the film. Takahashi wanted to use the film stills for prints (Guadagnino gave his permission for this – he’s a film director with an incredible sensibility for fashion) and here we are with a line-up of bomber jackets, hoodies, dresses and skirts that picture some of the most standout moments from the remake. Tilda Swinton – who played three roles in the film – and her character of Madame Blanc in a floor-sweeping, red dress appeared in two ways: as a literal print, and as skirt-pant hybrid in the same colour. I think no other designer can make a collection look so good, using just one reference and focusing so much on it. The theme doesn’t feel tired or invasive. It’s for fans, but not only – I bet any Undercover client will rush for the collection’s garments, without even watching Suspiria. You haven’t? Please do!

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.