Trouville’s Addresses

Wherever you go in Trouville-Sur-Mer, there’s a view on the ocean (or you at least feel this fresh, iodine-filled breeze). So no there’s no wonder that the locals are truly connected to their surroundings. That’s reflected in the town’s boutiques, which mix this kind of surfer girl allure with the eternally timeless, quintessentially French style (when you come to Normandy, you will discover that in fact, all that Frenchness in fashion isn’t entirely a cliché – those women are born with this gorgeous style). Here are my favourite addresses in Trouville:

 

When you enter Chez Stef, you feel like in a wardrobe of a very chic party-goer, who lives near the beach. Stef, the owner of the boutique, sells well-curated, beautiful, artinasal goods from Ibiza (think Loewe x Paula’s Ibiza style), as well as her owns designs. I witnessed how Trouville women adore her kaftans and parachute dresses: they all got sold out within an hour. When in town, you’ve got to visit Stef!

11 rue de Paris 35

Boheme is where you get the French classics, which seem to be fantastically sun-drenched already there, in-store (loved all the mustard and rust colour palette). The store sells small,affordable Made-in-France-tag labels, as well as blankets, pillow, cotton bags and artisanal baskets. Love.

93 rue des Bains

La Quincaillerie d’Albertine feels like a cabinet des curiosités, where you can buy everything you see. From hand-made stationery (notebooks, postcards) to socks (got a crab-printed pair by Royalties), you won’t leave this place with empty hands.

78 rue des Bains

If you’re a fan of vintage, you can’t miss Violette Vintage. While vintage luxury fashion tends to get overpriced, here you will be surprised to find Louis Vuitton kints, Hermès silks and Yves Saint Laurent coats in very appealing prices. The store’s funky (yes, I used this word!) interior takes you to another decade.

12 rue Victor-Hugo

(Mum and Stef from Chez Stef)

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Trouville-Sur-Mer

Easter in Normandy couldn’t be a better idea! We stayed in Trouville-Sur-Mer, a charming town that used to be a fishing village in the past. Chocolate eclairs and baguettes for breakfast, oysters, St. Jacques clams and sea urchins straight from the port market for lunch, literally red sunsets after dinner… all that accompanied by a refreshing ocean breeze, car trips to nearby locations (posts coming up soon) and this truly effortless, care-free French style that radiates from the locals. Would love to stay here forever. Will post my favourite addresses in Trouville tomorrow!

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s – Country. Jacquemus AW19

Simon Porte Jacquemus‘ autumn-winter 2019 collection for men signalled his (temporary) departure from the always sunny, always beach-y wonderland that got him slightly trapped for the last few seasons. But, it’s Jacquemus – France will forever be his endless inspiration. This time, he went to the French countryside, and came back to Paris with a warm, ready-to-get-dirty offering. The designer presented his collection around a table full of cheese, grapes and bread, and posted a look-book photographed far, far from the big city – the hills of Montpellier. The collection’s leading inspiration? “Traditional French workwear,” he said, “bakery guys, farm workers. They are real, real clothes, cotton, wool.” We’ve got thick, durable collared outerwear and matching pants in brown; printed shirts that seemed to be inspired with Cezanne’s rural still-lives; leather pants that were a fashion version of an apron you wear to a barn; heavy trekking boots. But there was also the softer part of the collection, focusing on slightly over-sized fitted suits – something quite new to Jacquemus’ young menswear line. The designer’s love letter to the beautiful, French farm life could not miss foulards, tied loosely around the models’ necks. Now, anyone planning a detoxifying, rural escape anytime soon?

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Men’s / Le Gadjo. Jacquemus SS19

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Couldn’t ask for a better ‘summer fashion’ moment. For his highly anticipated menswear debut, Simon Porte Jacquemus took us to one of his most beloved places, Marseille (specifically Calanque de Sormiou, a spectacular beach which is a stone throw from the  French city). The runway was staged on the beach, with blankets and real-life holiday-goers as a backdrop. Jacquemus called the collection Gadjo, which is a Gypsy expression meaning ‘a man that belongs to no community’. But also, it’s a way to say ‘boy’ in the South of France. Shortly, it’s a word that Jacquemus feels connected to strongly, noting his origins and the care-free attitude to life.

So, what’s a Jacquemus man like? Like Simon himself. Just take a look at his Instagram, and you will quickly capture his sense of style: bold cotton shirts (worn with, or without, a slightly cartoonish tie), khaki bermudas, loosely fit blazers, bucket hats. And, if the weather is fine, great love for showing off his hairy torso. The clothes models wore (all street-casted, as far as I know) were exactly what Jacquemus loves wearing on the regular basis. I think I love it too – just look at all the energetic colours, patchworked knits and… hot denim! Jacquemus’ menswear isn’t complicated, but is well suited for daily life (in summer, specifically). Noting that Simon’s women’s line is relatively affordable, I think that my next season shopping cart is about to burst at the seams with all these goodies.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

La Bombe. Jacquemus SS18

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‘La bombe’ is the way Simon Porte Jacquemus thinks of his late mother, Valérie, who is the designer’s lifetime inspiration and muse. It’s  a popular saying for beautiful, confident women in the Soe uth of France – the region, where the designer was born and which he continues to celebrate in his collections. The spring-summer 2018 show was like a sun-drenched fashion poetry, that took place in an extraordinary location – at Musee Picasso in Paris (no other fashion show took place here before). A special place requires special clothes, and Jacquemus’ pieces will be exactly what you’re going to demand when the summer comes – mini-dresses kept in sultry lengths, curved straw hats (slightly different from the ones from the memorable spring-summer 2017 La Santons de Provence collection), polka dots and lots of eclectic, Lacroix-like jewellery, but kept in a more minimal, sweet-candy style. This season, the textures feel softer than usual at Jacquemus. The young designer is keen on experimenting and he felt like draping and shaping the silhouette with the textiles, rather than keeping it stiff and statuesque. Simon had also been thinking about “French Island girls—they could be in Corsica, or Martinique in the Caribbean, too.” Henri Matisse’s paintings appear in my mind right away…

The overall effect? Blushing girls with their unfinished make-ups, in care-free dresses that they really ENJOY wearing – that’s the most frivolous and heart-warming start of Paris fashion week you could imagine. The Jacquemus femme is a bomb in every meaning of this word this (and every) season, that’s for sure.

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All collages by Edward Kanarecki.

Parisian Journal

 

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Le Café des Antiquaires is the perfect spot to sit and sip Noisette in between the shows.

Paris. It’s a cliché to say that Paris is the ‘city of love’. But that’s true in some way, as it’s simply impossible not to fall in love with Paris. If Paris was a person, it would be an extremely multi-faceted, slightly arrogant, but elusive character. Not a friend – rather a great lover. I’ve visited Paris many, many times, but those few days I’ve spent during the last fashion week will stay in my mind for long. Spring is the moment, when Paris blooms. People on the streets are so beautiful. Coffee tastes better, while art exhibitions open on every corner. J’adore.

Click the images below to read the captions.

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This woman – ultimately Parisian.
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Cherry-blossom tree near Le Bon Marche.
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My mum.

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

#2016 – Jacquemus

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It’s Paris, and it feels like a breath of fresh air coming along Jacquemus‘ autumn-winter 2016. The city of French fashion is undergoing a wave of youthful talent – and Simon Porte Jacquemus represents that perfectly with his extraordinary, yet wearable garments. “I would like there to be less industry and more poetry” is what he declared backstage, minutes before the show. It was all about a surrealist illusion this season – the dresses floated in the air and spaghetti straps were magically elevated above the shoulders. The exaggerated shoulders, although distinctly reminded the old, good Martin Margiela, introduced us to other arty shapes and geometric cuts – sometimes, they looked even too grotesque, as in case of the “mini-skirt” worn with a pastel-blue turtleneck. But what was the most genuine from the entire collection was the expanded accessory line – block-heeled “rond carré” shoes, asymmetrical gloves in tangerine orange and cute, kidney-shaped bags are the highlights.

Jacquemus frequently mentions his typically French child-hood as a continous inspiration for his collections and spring-summer 2017 is not an exception. But his newest “story”, as he tends to call it, is much more refined. The designer searched deep in Provençal folk culture, and he conveyed the mood of a sun-drenched, care-free French village girl in a brilliant way.

Jacquemus loves the term ‘naive’. There’s always something childish about his collections – for SS17, it’s definitely the setting of his venue: a fake, orange sun glowed at the end of the runway, radiating with summer nostalgia. First element of the show that caught my eye was a range of lovely, straw hats, or chapeau de paille if you prefer French. The dresses with voluminous sleeves and over-sized pinstripe suits are on everybody’s lips for spring, but Simon managed to make them look eternally chic. In fact, the collection isn’t about a new idea or silhouette. Borrowed-from-a-guy shirt, block-heeled shoes, geometrical culottes and sexy cuts are very Jacquemus. I guess that’s the appeal of this collection: it’s focused on weekend-perfect ready-to-wear with an arty twist.

Simon is the designer, who brings joy to the fashion industry – looking at his collections, you can forget about the world for at least a second.

Jacquemus SS17 Campaign

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The collection is about those figurines and the traditions of the south of France,Simon Porte Jacquemus explained, while describing his spring-summer 2017 campaign. “So it was very logical to shoot them this way, like figurines. I wanted to speak about those traditional santons de provence in a poetic and modern way.” Always in love affair with the place of origin, Jacquemus never quits to reintepret the South of France’ traditional heritage in his poetic collections.

Photograph: David Luraschi Model: Rose Van Bosstraeten

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La Santons de Provence. Jacquemus SS17

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Simon Porte Jacquemus, like Christelle Kocher or Glenn Martens, is a represantative of Paris’ new generation of most daring and exciting fashion designers. Jacquemus frequently mentions his typically French child-hood as a continous inspiration for his collections, and spring-summer 2017 is not an exception. But his newest “story”,  as he tends to call it, is much more refined. The designer searched deep in Provençal folk culture, and he conveyed the mood of a sun-drenched, care-free French village girl in a brilliant way.

Jacquemus loves the term naive. There’s always something childish about his collections, and this season it’s definitely the setting of his venue: a fake, orange sun glowed at the end of the runway, radiating with summer nostalgia. First element of the show that caught my eye was a range of lovely, straw hats, or chapeau de paille if you prefer French. The dresses with voluminous sleeves and over-sized pinstripe suits are on everybody’s lips for spring, but Simon managed to make them look eternally chic. In fact, the collection isn’t about a new idea or silhouette. Borrowed-from-a-guy shirt, block-heeled shoes, geometrical culottes and sexy cuts are very Jacquemus. I guess that’s the appeal of this collection: it’s focused on weekend-perfect ready-to-wear with an arty twist. And it’s quite easy to wear, if you take it off the runway!

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