One Universe. Lemaire SS19

For Christophe Lemaire and Sarah Linh Tran, women’s and men’s wardrobe is one universe. That’s why they presented both on one runway this season. In terms of clothes, this was a classic Lemaire collection, without much risks. Shirt dress in cotton ventile, double breasted jacket, baggy skirt in pigment dye poplin, oversized, knotted trench coat (as seen on Tasha Tilberg), linen sailor pants, large bum bags in nappa leather… clothes that are in constant demand. Majority of the looks is genderless (for example the coats, that are cut in the same way for both women and men). I adore Lemaire, but I wish the designers tried new territories next time – this collection looks very much like their last few seasons, just kept in different colour palette. If not for the live music and the models’ eventual dancing, that would be a rather stiff presentation, gone completely unnoticed in the Paris fashion week crowd.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Connected. Jil Sander SS19

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It’s the third season at Jil Sander for Lucie and Luke Meier. And actually, it’s the first time when I’m convinced that they’re the right fit for this brand. This designer duo always highlight that Jil Sander isn’t what many people have in mind – an image of stern, cold minimalism. Sander’s work was minimal, true, but it rather turned towards tactility, comfort and a certain connection between the garment and the body. All that was beautifully presented in Meiers’ spring-summer 2019 collection in Milan. There were those boxier, slouchier pieces (like the pistachio shirt with exaggerated cuffs) and more feminine pieces (take the flowing, knitted dresses or the black, ankle-length skirt with hand-sculpted frills). The accessories game was exceptionally good this season as well. XXL bags (held upside down); platform sandals; jewellery that looked like wearable sculptures. It’s worth visiting the nearest Jil Sander boutique this season.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

A Decade. Victoria Beckham SS19

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Here we’ve got the other anniversary collection from London. Unlike Mary Katrantzou, Victoria Beckham didn’t revisit her archives literally for the collection that celebrates her 10 years in fashion. And, other than the appearance on the London fashion week schedule, major media fuss and the appearance of model greats on the runway (like Stella Tennant, who opened the show, Małgosia Bela, Grace Bol, Tasha Tilberg and Liya Kebede), that was a very regular, Victoria Beckham collection. Chic, slouchy tailoring, super-slim crepe trousers that are here to be worn underneath every second dress you’ve got, satin tank-tops with lace inserts, minimal eveningwear, over-sized shirts. Wardrobe essentials, elevated with a refreshing colour palette and minimal-feminine sensitivity. Soul II Soul’s Back To Life played in the background, reminding the soundtrack from Phoebe Philo’s remarkable spring-summer 2014 collection. This triggered the inner finding of parallels between Philo’s work, and Beckham’s brand codes the designer repeats and refines every season. But then, I can somehow forgive Victoria for doing that. Look at her now, 10 years later. That body-con dress and killer stilettos are buried deep, deep in the fashion history. Let’s see what the next decade brings for this iconic, ever-changing woman.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki, featuring Euan Uglow’s painting.

Heavenly. The Row SS19

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No fashion show this time, but a peaceful, tranquil showroom presentation accompanied with a look-book starring Saskia De Brauw. That’s how Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen reply to New York’s fashion week fuss. Oh, the clothes. The Row is heavenly. Majestic. Angelic. But don’t think of any opulent embroideries or ornamental details, no. Rather, a voluminous dove-gray silk dress. Tweedy coat with the frayed edges. Robe-like gowns with regally upturned collars. All hand-made, kept in the highest possible quality of craftsmanship. Those garments don’t look still and statuesque, but flowing. I’m absolutely in love with this one look where a huge bag works as layer of clothing worn over a minimal, sleeveless dress. Editors tend to say that clients who adored Phoebe Philo’s Céline should go to The Row. Well, I wouldn’t go that path of logic. The Olsen twins gradually create their own vocabulary, that is less and less Philo-esque. They finally create distinct clothing that speaks for itself; it says ‘The Row’, not ‘Philo appreciation sample’. Also, a big shoutout to The Row’s new menswear line that launches in October. Mostly with a Made in Japan tag, the men’s garments (just a few preview images were released) will be as exquisite as the women’s. The price range, that starts from $4,000, speaks for itself as well.

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Collages by Edward Kanarecki.