Razor Sharp. Peter Do SS20

Peter Do SS20 collage

Peter Do‘s name-sake label has been making waves since its very start (which was less than two years ago). The New York-based designer doesn’t do fashion shows and presents his collections off-schedule – those are two factors that could easily make him and his brand an off-the-radar outsider But Peter Do has a consistence in his work that many, much more established brands can envy: very clear, clean and minimal aesthetic that’s as precise as a razor. Do, along with Bottega Veneta’s Daniel Lee and Rokh’s Rok Hwang, shares a very specific alma mater that additionally attracts clients: Phoebe Philo’s Céline. But Philophiles won’t find Céline-like pieces at Peter Do, that’s not the point. Spring-summer 2020’s hero piece is an adjustable jacket that separates into a bolero and a backless waistcoat. Another highlight is the single-button jacket that fastens high and off-center on the torso, producing a nipped-in silhouette. The colour palette, mostly black and white, is beautifully contrasted with shades of ochre and rust. What else is sure about Do? Tailoring is key for the brand. And it definitely stole women’s hearts, if Net-A-Porter is restocking the current collection, and such important retail players as Dover Street Market and Bergdorf Goodman already have the Peter Do classics on their racks.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Stable and Slouchy. Lemaire SS20

At Lemaire, references and messages are absent, or very subtle, and comparing to most other labels, here the clothes do the talking. Christophe Lemaire and Sarah Linh Tran‘s woman doesn’t change from season to season – her style is consistent, just as the label’s style. For spring-summer 2020, the designers used a colour palette full of timeless neutrals, which perfectly fits their new bodysuits, pleated stone-colored chinos with a rib-grazing wrapped waistband or over-sized waxed-cotton coats. The brand showed a handful of belted styles, all of them easy enough to be tossed over a handbag strap when it gets warmer. In the designers’ words, the collection is about “stable, but slouchy” shapes. Its impossible not to be convinced by Lemaire’s comfortable elegance this season.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Expensive Simplicity. The Row SS20

There’s no need in explaining why The Row is one of New York’s most luxurious brands – existing and thriving. And also, once seeing a The Row shirt in rwal life, you immediately understand its cosmic price. It’s crisp, but not stiff, it’s over-sized, but not slouchy. Even it’s white colour isn’t just white. It’s the shade of white that will match everything. Knowing that, you can forgive Ashley and Mary Kate-Olsen‘s lack of Instagrammable entertainment during their spring-summer 2020 fashion show. A minimal space, and the clothes as the main heros. The look feauturing a lilac shirt and beige pants caused more discussions than the most intricately embroidered dress or the most controversial fashion statement from any other brand we’ve seen this season. While some might say this collection felt distant and lacked spirit, I think its minimalism was finally soft – something I kind of missed from the Olsens in their last collections. This is the collection Carolyn Bessette Kennedy would wear forever. It’s a wardrobe of investment pieces – which, to a great extent is sustainable fashion without being mad about. Whether speaking of the ecru dress made out of cloudy, silk patches, or the ankle-lenght black coat that has the perfectly chic shoulders volume, The Row nails expensive simplicity like no other.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Getting Better and Better. Bottega Veneta Resort 2020

It’s been 11 months since Daniel Lee‘s arrival to Bottega Veneta, and it seems he’s there for, like, forever. Throughout this short time, the brand received big love from clients, who never bought at Bottega before. And it seems that the success isn’t solely rooted on the absence of Phobe Philo. Lee and his team prove this in the resort 2020 collection, which is sublime in every aspect, from bags to clothes. Leather accessories, whether in the brand’s signature intrecciato weave or not, are so good. Just look at the wrist-slung, tightly knotted bag in blue or orange strips of soft matte leather, or the sandals in fake snake, which featured three and a half encirclements of leather strip that ran upwards (these worked to cinch Lee’s expertly cut wide-leg pants and were complemented by similarly functioning bracelets). Clothes are a delight, as well. Whether we’re speaking of the draped leather dress in orange worn by Maria Carla Boscono or all the trench coats that appeared in the look-book, it’s a dream wardrobe. Minimalism and top knotch craftsmanship aren’t a novelty, but Bottega Veneta and Salvatore Ferragamo get that balance especially well in Italy today. Better start saving…

All collages by Edward Kanarecki.

Lemaire in Paris

Ok, why Lemaire doesn’t offer any accomodation services (same question to Dries Van Noten…)? The brand’s flagship store in Le Marais district is too good to be true. Just like the clothes, which are poetry of cut and fit. And I think I fell in complete love with their new classic Croissant bag.

28 Rue de Poitou / Paris 

Photos by Edward Kanarecki.

Elongated and Lean. Jil Sander Resort 2020

What Lucie and Luke Meier do at Jil Sander is so, so beautifully balanced and considered. Their resort 2020 look-book is one of their best collections to date, and they prove their comprehension of the brand’s heritage in every aspect, from impeccable tailioring to feminimine-slash-minimalist day-wear. “The silhouette is very elongated, very lean,” one of the designers mentioned to the press. “It follows the body line, but then it breaks with a playful gesture, like tying something around the waist, be it a belt, a sweater, or a leather waist bag. Trying to convey a sense of lightness and movement.” Also, I really love the element of nature that reappears in Meier’s collection season-to-season. Raffia-crocheted skirt and straw basket bags are one way to approach plastic-free, eco-friendly fashion. Tie-dye Shibori techniques, used as decorative elements on over-sized cotton shirtdresses, blouses and skirst, are artisan handworks that need no chemicals in production. Big yes to everything this collection delivers.

Collages by Edward Kanarecki.

Stable. Jil Sander AW19

The pursuit after ‘new Céline’ is getting intense, and people say Jil Sander might be the right candidate to fill the gap. But the brand’s designers – Lucie and Luke Meier – aren’t copying Phoebe Philo, and have no intentions to. They do their thing, with Jil Sander’s soft minimalist spirit in mind. The Meiers’ vision of the brand is consistent since their debut few seasons ago. Tailoring with relaxed fit, comfortable, big bags, earthy colour palette with eventual splashes of pastel. This season, the couple nailed the topic of dresses. Whether we’re speaking of a loosely fitted chemise or an ankle-length black gown, it’s the sensual v-neck cut that feels refreshing about them. Jil Sander’s fashion was minimal, true, but simultaneously feminine – that’s a statement the Meiers highlight every season to end the stereotype of cold, stern image the brand got drowned in. Still, a scarf would be more than welcome for all those revealing cuts, since it’s an autumn-winter collection. Wait, we’ve got a duvet jacket – every brand has one this season – that will keep you warm. Jil Sander is stable – it doesn’t ‘wow’ you, true, but the collections please with their well-balanced content. I think it’s in good hands. 

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Ultimate Minimalists. The Row AW19

It seems to me that Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen are the ultimate owners of minimalism in New York. With their sensivity for top knotch quality and craftsmanship, it’s no surprise that The Row is globally renowned among the richiest women who, rather than drown in Gucci, have similar preference for clean lines, soft cashmere comfort and especially, well, have nowhere else to go since Phoebe Philo left Celine (ok, there’s Lemaire, Jil Sander and Peter Do, and soon Bottega Veneta, but… still, they buy The Row). For autumn-winter 2019, Olsens delivered a collection that didn’t surprise, but as well didn’t dissapoint. Fur, beige coats? Checked. An over-sized ecru turtleneck-dress? Checked. Masculine tailoring? Checked – it got a bit more sculpted at the waist, which is a plus. You don’t really expect newness with The Row, except for some unexpected lining detail or an antique embellishment on a bag – basically details you will notice only when the clothes arrive on the rack.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Refined Serenity. The Row AW18

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Who would have ever, ever thought that Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen will come so far to become the Jil Sander, Helmut Lang and Margiela-at-Hermes of today? Since Phoebe Philo is no longer at Céline, it can be safely said that The Row automatically becomes the official successor label for minimalism (and pure luxury) lovers. I’m writing that ecstatically: the autumn-winter 2018 is undoubtedly the best collection the twins have delivered up to date. Just look at the refined outerwear and khaki raincoats; the delightful, ecru gown with a highlighted waist; masculine blazers – actually, to die for – and knits made of the best possible cashmere (to be worn over and over for ages). Oh, and I nearly forgot to mention, that a selection of rare Isamu Noguchi sculptures were there during the runway show, standing and observing the serene walk of such women as Karen Elson, Ajak Deng or Yasmin Warsame. Although New York fashion week is still on, I think the Olsen’s have. Ultimately. Won. My. Heart.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.