On The Sunny Side. Ganni SS18

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Copenhagen Fashion Week is the best indicator of what’s really hot, whether we’re speaking of Balenciaga’s or Céline’s cross-national influence. I always feel like the local designers make the best edit of current fashion tendencies with their very own, Scandinavian sharpness. Ganni, a Copenhagen girl’s favourite go-to label with over 20 stores across the Scandi-countries, is a great example of that ‘curation’. Ditte Reffstrup, brand’s creative director, sent down a sunny line-up of models (spot Dilone, Frederikke Sofie and Lera Abova) wearing joyous tea-dresses, beach-ready bras and striped knits for breezy spring evenings by the shore. The styling – as always on point – had some striking highlights, like wearing a V-neck mini-dress with extremely big flares underneath or layering a masculine blazer over a midi-skirt AND over matching pants. The show venue, designed in collaboration with the New York-based artist Ana Kras, was another feature that makes Ganni’s spring-summer 2018 collection worth taking a look at.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Witchy. Rodarte SS18

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Americans in Paris – I love seeing them here. Proenza Schouler‘s spring-summer 2018 was already a very good sign. The same day, Mulleavy sistersRodarte line-up was a feast for the eye in pure form. The show was staged in a Parisian cloister with a garden patio, where the models strolled around in witchy dresses and badass leather gears. All those ethereal and rebellious elements of a Rodarte woman symbolised Kate and Laura’s romantic sensibility with a sophisticated vision of femininity.

Throughout the seasons in New York, Rodarte reflected on womanhood in various ways, from skate girls to punk princesses. Spring-summer 2018 was “the most Rodarte collection” the sisters created, where they mixed all of their magical ingredients into one delightful potion. Like fairies, the models had baby’s-breath tiaras on their heads or carried huge bird of paradise bouquets. Some wore scarlet red gowns, some pastel pink ball-dresses, but all oozed with a carefree, A Midsummer Night’s Dream sweetness. There were the leather pieces, too, which are Rodarte’s signatures – this season ornamented with metallic bows. I guess the Mulleavy girls deserve a loud ‘bienvenue’, just like the Proenza Schouler boys do.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki (backdrop: stills and elements from ‘The Love Witch’ film from 2016).

Boys in Paris. Proenza Schouler SS18

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Lazaro Hernandez and Jack McCollough are the boys, who for years defined the contemporary chic of New York’s fashion scene. Hearing about their unexpected departure to Paris last season was quite a surprise. Everybody asked: what will New York fashion week be like without Proenza Schouler? Well, one thing’s sure – the Big Apple undoubtedly sobs that it didn’t witness one of the couples’ strongest and most beautiful collections.

But why Paris? And why so early for spring-summer 2018, while it will be presented by other labels in September? First, the brand decided to expand its recognition internationally, as Paris, not New York, is the place where all eyes look at. Second, the designers decided to dissolve the pre- and main-collection into one, consistent line-up, leaving more space (and time) for their intimate, creative process. Vetements done it, with success; Burberry has a similar business model; Rodarte, which presented its collection the same day in the French capital, takes the same risk this season.

But lets talk about the clothes, which in the end are the most important. As I’ve mentioned earlier, that was a truly impressive collection. Form low skirts and ready-for-everything blazers to statuesque ruffled dresses and stark red florals, Lazaro and Jack searched for a balance between arty edginess and comfortable elegance. Wait, we’re in Paris, just on time for haute couture shows – this explains the last looks, pimped up by the local petites mains. Looking like moving fluffy clouds from a distance, those were intricately inserted feathers on Sasha Pivovarova’s art gallery owner jacket or Mariacarla Boscono’s show-stopping evening dress à la Black Swan. Actually, each look is worth a paragraph. Also, please take a look at the low-heeled shoes with pointy-toes, kept in simple black or embellished with colourful beads. An instant need.

I think that a warm ‘bienvenue’ is the right term to greet Proenza Schouler at their new, European home!

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki (backdrop: combination of different installations and artworks by Kate MccGwire).

When in Zürich. Vetements SS18

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Vetements‘ no-show spring-summer 2018 collection was a sensation in its own nature. Instead of a regular fashion show with models (wait – Vetements has never done a ‘regular’ fashion show, if you take a moment to look back at their shocking venue choices…), the designer collective lead by Demna Gvasalia exhibited over 50, real-size photographs in a Parisian warehouse. Photographed and styled surprisingly by Demna himself (no Pierre Ange Carlotti and Lotta Volkova this season…), these were the images of real real people in Zürich. The Swiss capital is the new location of Vetements’ headquarters, so deciding to keep it ‘local’ makes sense. The look-book presents everyone, from elderly women and families to bankers and goth teenagers, striking poses in new-season Vetements.

But is the new-season Vetements really new? If you’ve noticed looks that seem to be a déjà vu from the brand’s previous seasons – like over-sized checked shirts, deconstructed fur coats or a voluminous trench coat – then don’t be surprised. For this season, Gvasalia preferred to contemplate and reconsider, rather than create something absolutely fresh. Some of the pieces were recut and improved from the technical side, while others, like the Vetements signature tea-dress or cult Reebok trainers, went through small alternations (emoji prints, polka dots, surely to become next season’s hits).  From one side, this concept is might be disturbing. Will Vetements stop developing creatively? Well, I doubt it. From the other side, that’s quite relaxing, as the brand suggests buyers and other labels, that its a non-sense to produce two (or more) totally different collections a year. Cherish the classics! Don’t rush for the new pair of shoes, if last year’s platform boots or cigarette-lighter heels will stay in the shops for good. Slowing the pace is right, from time-to-time.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.