Elongated and Lean. Jil Sander Resort 2020

What Lucie and Luke Meier do at Jil Sander is so, so beautifully balanced and considered. Their resort 2020 look-book is one of their best collections to date, and they prove their comprehension of the brand’s heritage in every aspect, from impeccable tailioring to feminimine-slash-minimalist day-wear. “The silhouette is very elongated, very lean,” one of the designers mentioned to the press. “It follows the body line, but then it breaks with a playful gesture, like tying something around the waist, be it a belt, a sweater, or a leather waist bag. Trying to convey a sense of lightness and movement.” Also, I really love the element of nature that reappears in Meier’s collection season-to-season. Raffia-crocheted skirt and straw basket bags are one way to approach plastic-free, eco-friendly fashion. Tie-dye Shibori techniques, used as decorative elements on over-sized cotton shirtdresses, blouses and skirst, are artisan handworks that need no chemicals in production. Big yes to everything this collection delivers.

Collages by Edward Kanarecki.

Positive. Marni Pre-Fall 2019

There’s always something very joyous and positive about Francesco Risso‘s approach to designing collections for Marni. For pre-fall 2019, which starts to hit the stores, he crashed prints and textures without much caution, creating a beautifully chaotic wardrobe for an equally unique personality. The utilitarian elegance of uniforms was translated into elongated dusters, sleek car coats and double-breasted peacoats in thick fabrics like felted and pressed bouclé, padded satin, polished leather, shearlings and ponyskins. Psychedelic brocades and Lurex jacquards were used in one blouse, while Inuit-inspired prints were mixed together in opera coats and skirts with half-plissé side panels. The recurring use of natural materials is a nod to the no-waste, responsible approach the designer emphasizes. I think Marni, with Risso’s folksy aesthic, can take a step forward and start making its collections from upcycled materials, too. And incorporate traditional artisans’ work into each collection. This would be a brilliant example for other Italian brands to follow.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Virginie Viard. Chanel Resort 2020

While the MET Gala stole the spotlight from the last few days, it would be great pity to forget about Chanel‘s resort 2020 collection, the first solely designed under Virginie Viard‘s direction. As Karl Lagerfeld would say, the beat goes on, and the brand is moving on after the death of its visionary designer. But I think it’s in good hands – Viard was the closest person to Karl, and understands the brand like no one else. Changes from the Lagerfeld repertoire were subtle, but meaningful. First, the venue. Travel was very much on Virginie’s mind, so Grand Palais was temporarily changed into an elegant train station, with a Belle Epoque café, potted palms and so on. Still, the setting wasn’t as show-stopping as the ones Karl did – which suggests that Viard wants to bring the focus on the clothes. Second, the clothes. They felt… real. A trench coat. Easy-in-approach cardigans with Chanel chains and voluminous pants Coco Chanel would love to wear herself. Jackie-Kennedy-inspired vacation looks. Even the eveningwear seemed to be more approachable. This was a 24/7 wardrobe fit not for a risk-taker, but a self-aware woman with big money in her wallet. Well, that’s Chanel. And Viard delivered this. Let’s see what she bring to the table in in near future.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Choices. Prada Resort 2020

Retro florals, smart layering, scarves bejewelled with XXL sequins, baroque pearl earrings, chunky hand-knit tennis vests, clashed prints. Carefree eclecticism that isn’t overly extravagant, but daringly fantastic for everyday. It seemed that Miuccia Prada resorted to simpler, easier codes of fashion, leaving the darkness of last season behind. But in a way, this was Prada’s defiance in the time of difficulties. The collection, staged in New York (just like last year), was pure joy, whether we’re speaking of a blue peasant shirt-dress with naive flower embroideries worn by Freja Beha or adorable, knitted striped beanies and socks in bold colours, paired with the most ‘unmatching’ looks. There were also looks that will comfort the safer Prada customers, like light, loosely tailored blazers and classic coats. For me, what stood out in this collection, was the number of possibilities, suited for many different personalities. While the last few collections from Prada had those two or three key looks that ruled the runway, and had a tendency to be polarised between super feminine and super dark, here the designer really emphasised that sort of off-the-fashion-show reality. Take what you love, mix it the way you feel like.

Collage by Edward Kanarecki.