Meeting Stefano Pilati

Berlin is so, so good. You meet Stefano Pilati on the street. The most stylish man ever. From the refined and sublimely elegant creative direction at (Yves) Saint Laurent to his gender-blurring Random Identities brand, I’ve been following Pilati and his sense of aesthetic for years. Meeting him was a dream – and dreams come true!

When in Zürich. Vetements SS18

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Vetements‘ no-show spring-summer 2018 collection was a sensation in its own nature. Instead of a regular fashion show with models (wait – Vetements has never done a ‘regular’ fashion show, if you take a moment to look back at their shocking venue choices…), the designer collective lead by Demna Gvasalia exhibited over 50, real-size photographs in a Parisian warehouse. Photographed and styled surprisingly by Demna himself (no Pierre Ange Carlotti and Lotta Volkova this season…), these were the images of real real people in Zürich. The Swiss capital is the new location of Vetements’ headquarters, so deciding to keep it ‘local’ makes sense. The look-book presents everyone, from elderly women and families to bankers and goth teenagers, striking poses in new-season Vetements.

But is the new-season Vetements really new? If you’ve noticed looks that seem to be a déjà vu from the brand’s previous seasons – like over-sized checked shirts, deconstructed fur coats or a voluminous trench coat – then don’t be surprised. For this season, Gvasalia preferred to contemplate and reconsider, rather than create something absolutely fresh. Some of the pieces were recut and improved from the technical side, while others, like the Vetements signature tea-dress or cult Reebok trainers, went through small alternations (emoji prints, polka dots, surely to become next season’s hits).  From one side, this concept is might be disturbing. Will Vetements stop developing creatively? Well, I doubt it. From the other side, that’s quite relaxing, as the brand suggests buyers and other labels, that its a non-sense to produce two (or more) totally different collections a year. Cherish the classics! Don’t rush for the new pair of shoes, if last year’s platform boots or cigarette-lighter heels will stay in the shops for good. Slowing the pace is right, from time-to-time.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki.

Evolving. Koché Resort 2018

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Although emerging designers prefer to stay away from pre-collections, Kristelle Kocher took the ambitious path. Ladies and Gentlemen, here’s the first ever resort collection coming from the Paris-based Koché. We’ve all got used to the label’s remote show venues (like vast public spaces of the French capital or Folies Bergères) that helped Kristelle build and envision her label’s street identity. Kocher’s pre-collection proves that Koché has its design codes that continue to evolve. The idea of streetwear with haute human touch is here for good. But it’s not about your average hoodies, oh no. Expect intricately embellished, yet loose (track)suits; fleecy sweaters made of different gauge yarns; feminine feather inserts and boas clashed with athletic jackets. The look-book is filled with white, black and electric shades of blue and coral red – you can choose toned or daring, according to your mood.

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Collage by Edward Kanarecki (backdrop: ‘Raindrops’ installation by Urs Fischer).

Parisian Journal

 

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Le Café des Antiquaires is the perfect spot to sit and sip Noisette in between the shows.

Paris. It’s a cliché to say that Paris is the ‘city of love’. But that’s true in some way, as it’s simply impossible not to fall in love with Paris. If Paris was a person, it would be an extremely multi-faceted, slightly arrogant, but elusive character. Not a friend – rather a great lover. I’ve visited Paris many, many times, but those few days I’ve spent during the last fashion week will stay in my mind for long. Spring is the moment, when Paris blooms. People on the streets are so beautiful. Coffee tastes better, while art exhibitions open on every corner. J’adore.

Click the images below to read the captions.

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This woman – ultimately Parisian.
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Cherry-blossom tree near Le Bon Marche.
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My mum.

All photos by Edward Kanarecki.

#2016 – Christelle Kocher

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Seeing Lindsey Wixson walk down the crowdy alley in Parisian La Canopée isn’t a usual, everyday sight. And it’s even stranger, when you wonder whether it’s really her, or an interestingly dressed passer-by. Christelle Kocher, the designer behind Koché, is obsessed with elevating street wear, and she’s the only designer who literally takes her clothes to the streets. For autumn-winter 2016, she invited the fashion crowd to Passage du Prado, a home of cheap phone stores and cheesy hair-dressers; her spring-summer 2017 was seen by anyone who was running their errands in this gigantic, commercial spot.

Kocher’s latest outing was filled with her quite well recognisable signatures. She works at Maison Lemarié, a couture atelier specialising in feathers, so that’s why her off-the-street (or not) parkas and sweatshirts were all about excessive layers of ostrich plume. Velour sweatpants with a multi-coloured, zipped track jackets (my middle-school P.E. memories go posh) – a thing for dressing in anti-fashion way is intense here, too. Adwoa Aboah sported a not-your-average-cross-fit bra-top, while meticulously embroidered slip-dresses never looked so… effortless. I know this sounds cliché, but admit – Koché is a brand, which fuses the idea of “on-the-go” with minute attention to detail, close to haute couture level. The styling of the show felt absolutely spontaneous, and both the street-cast, and professional agency models seemed to enjoy the nature of this show.

It seems that Koché appeared on the industry’s mind just this year – so be sure to have this brand on your radar in 2017.

Chinatown Mules. Y/Project SS17

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Amid the new league of young, fashion talents based in Paris, there’s Jacquemus, Koché, Courrèges boys, and of course Vetements collective. Another one in the hood is Glenn Martens, who is the designer behind Y/Project. While other re-invent heritage, French brands or mess around with underground rave culture, Glenn is somewhere in between reviving Marie Antoinette dresses and developing a 21st century gear for cool women (and men). For spring/summer 2017, the designer nails denim pants, which are very much into elongated silhouettes. Velvet body-con piece or a pony-hair top subvert the term “elegance”, just like unconventional evening wear which focuses on exaggerated, sleeveless parachute dresses. The models wore layers of pearl necklaces, ironically contrasting with the so-in-demand street-wise hoodies. Following the anti-fashion maxim, the uglier the better, Glenn sent out a line of the most trashy mules and stilettos you have ever seen. “They’re from Chinatown,” he said backstage, without an attempt to conceal this fact. I doubt a modern-day princess would immerse herself in those cumbersome clothes – but a Parisian skate-girl, for sure.

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La Canopée. Koché SS17

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Seeing Lindsey Wixson walk down the crowdy alley in Parisian La Canopée isn’t a usual, everyday sight. And it’s even stranger, when you wonder whether it’s really her, or an interestingly dressed passer-by. Christelle Kocher, the designer behind Koché, is obsessed with elevating street wear, and she’s the only designer who literally takes her clothes to the streets. Last season, she invited the fashion crowd to Passage du Prado, a home of cheap phone stores and cheesy hair-dressers; yesterday, her spring-summer 2017 was seen by the anyone who was running their errands in this gigantic, commercial passage.

Kocher’s latest outing was filled with her quite well recognisable signatures. She works at Maison Lemarié, a couture atelier specialising in feathers, so that’s why her off-the-street (or not) parkas and sweatshirts were all about excessive layers of ostrich plume. Velour sweatpants with a multi-coloured, zipped track jackets (my middle-school P.E. memories go posh) – a thing for dressing in anti-fashion way is intense here, too. Adwoa Aboah sported a not-your-average-cross-fit bra-top, while meticulously embroidered slip-dresses never looked so… effortless. I know this sounds cliché, but admit – Koché is a brand, which fuses the idea of “on-the-go” with minute attention to detail, close to haute couture level. The styling of the show felt absolutely spontaneous, and both the street-cast, and professional agency models seemed to enjoy the nature of this show. First days of Paris Fashion Week are always my favourite – it’s the moment, when niche, French designers present their intriguing, not-business-wise attitude to style.

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Female Nomad. No21 SS17

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Alessandro Dell’AcQua isn’t resigning from his signature touches this season, like the ethernally chic macramé lace skirts or feather-trimmed tops. Simultaneously, he’s ready for introducing new attitude to his label: No21 has never been so athleisure-wise as it’s now for spring-summer 2017. Breaking down the first looks, it’s easy to spot the designer’s obsession with modernistic mesh, as it appeared everywhere, from the hems on loose dresses to sporty t-shirts. Hoodies are wherever you turn this season, but Dell’AcQua didn’t feel discouraged with that fact. His version,  in lace and with a pastel-green zip, is über-cool. But it’s not only about the current street-wise mood at No21. Multi-printed, patchwork skirts and dresses suggested the look of a modern-day nomad who’s prepared for every day’s adventures. Care-free and optimistic, she wears her awakening tassels, opulent embellishments and gypsy-esque florals with grace. Also, I loved the way how Alessandro played with footwear: his kitten-heels were taped with fluorescent bows and, as usual in case of Dell’AcQua, were styled with beige socks. Pastel-pink loving No21 girl for spring dramatically differs from the sharp, grunge roxette we’ve seen for autumn. Oh, and the sunglasses line was a pretty new addition, too! Made in collaboration with the one and only, Linda Farrow.

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After Party. Alexander Wang SS17

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Get over it – Alexander Wang isn’t a guy who does serious fashion. I completely understood that last season, when he sent a line of weed-printed dresses and “Strict” logo beanies. Don’t fight it. Wang’s newest collection is youth, and one thing is sure: the future success of spring-summer 2017 is based on the young customers.

Basically, it’s all about sportswear and streetwear (as usual), and that’s highlighted by the fact the event launched a collaboration with Adidas (this had to happen). The main line was a ‘remix’ of the designer’s previous collections – buckled sandals from SS16, pyjama shirts à la SS14 – and it mainly focused on unlikely, messy pairings. A fur bath-robe, neon-purple bra and board shorts. ‘Groundbreaking’. Of course, there was a wide range of lux hoodies, a bunch of sultry, Cali dresses and lots of neon-and-lace combos. The last is a rip off Christopher Kane’s cult SS11, by the way. Concluding – you can be a slave to Alexander’s “fashion”, or not join the club.  But then, you won’t be invited to the after show party…

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